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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON-POST 





Paris, Monday, January 31, 1994 


No. 34,499 


That 


.. ;V/ ...-. . ... 

May Threaten Party 


By PatrickE*Ty ler 

New. Yerit Tima Service' '.. 

BEUING —Under enormous pressure from 
ibe Clinton administration, Qttoa f aces a series " 
of decisions that could result ingrcaler freedom 
of expression and. guarantees of basic human 
lights that leaders - baye k«g consid- 

ered a potential threat to ihiesumral tf Com-' 

munist Party role. . "■■■' . 

Already, there seems to/be a new surgp at 
democratic activity. . : ■ . ; - 

Late Wednesday, 11 d&adeats 


uaie weanesaay, 1 1 mssuuais asnnm 
signed a two-page-statement .calling for tee. 
release of QinYongmiix, a yramgpampMeteer 


MEWS ANALYSIS 


*>.- '■ -c . 


di spatched by it«; PnbBc/Seamiy Bureau last 
month for. two-years-of hard labor- His crime 
was urging nonviolent political ch a n ge in a., 
^pwira* charter’ 1 written in November. 

He joins Thousarafc.of others .stiO iuipris npcd 
in fhhia tor thcntavioileat expresaqn of tear 
political and religious beliefs. In his absence, 
-his doP eagnialBft tVriwed to conlume speaking 

mil : _ 

Wd Jingsheng, China’s most famous democ- 
racy campaigner, whoesnergedhist fall fromJ4 
years in prison, earned ea t one-man fiee- 

-T.- ■■■■ — - — - Alt f wpt Tru crivins inter- 



* \myi 
-irSM : 


pofice 

muzzle hrm. .. . 

These stirrings are eapected to grow. 

The pressure to open Ac swto&tm still 
further nas come from. Preadent Bpl Cuntpo s 
threat to caned China's low-tariff access to the 
■ OS. market unless Beijing makes “owwdl^r. 
mhcant progress” in human ri^ts, mdodmjL 
freedom for ofenificMit numbers of po btea t 
prisoners and Rj^ C^ accessTOWjor oMa^ 
and detention centers. .. . 

The admmistration also wanfeUHn ftWioofr- 

en its emigration restrictions; stop- jammu® 


foreign newsf . broadcasts and come to . tons 

with Ac Iorig-arimiering independence jdow- 

. meatittXbet. . . . . . _ . . _ .. 

Tnp officials, mdndmg President Jiang Z c- 
. min, We said o»‘™ is '“going to make an 
. dris year, to respond to Mr. Clinton’s 
1 requirements. 

r'lTcanied through, these decisions wflldis- 
. prove the oonvenuonal wisdom that China’s 
leaders are paralyzed with mdedsioa as they 
' await the death of the senior' leader^ Deng 

-Xiaoping. • - 

ft Vtbo eariy to say wbdh» China wiD ■= 
eaqand on the initial stepsithas taken or 
- promised in recent meetings with Secretary of 
Slate Wanen M.' Christopher arid other Aism- 
cdi c£5dalsC r 

But if i OriML - commies with the U.S. de- 
marids, Ae rdaxation of freedoms could well 
Tcmvigwate the deanoexa^mweme ntum t has 
been doanani in China since il' last erupted m 
the spring of 1989, only to be crashed in Tian- ■ 
amnen Square. ' /.." j. 

intw vigws with Cbioaschdars. Western dip- 
l/wnats and economists suggest that the next 
few months arc critical to dete rm in ing the fu- 
ture course of politics. ■. . ... . 

By thtitin tarring to force open China's dosed 
and intolerant political system, Mr. Qintonhas 

boi^tomedti»coimtiysleaderewitha<Hleinr 

. ma. 

CariceBaticm of Qrina's favorable trade star 
tns could result m a painful setbadc tor its 
T ^m»»jfahl«» wvinoniicexpaiiaon.altiiough such 
a move would also hurt U^- businesses that 
bare been eager to invest in Qmm. 

. . Bot jECMBa«eeM>ts the.buroan-rights chair 
hage, its Canmsmrot leaders nay set them- 



ScoBt3JING,Page4 


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Ar^«t md^monPeres appoRcfamg flie podram at the Worid Economic Fonim on SnmlBy to annomce a° aa»wl <>£&■ 


flie ^ and downs of tour foreign 
V terfBg hrinogiatriCMaa. Page 7. 


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. ...... 

. REUING — Qrina banned oonstrartKm , 

prmects for ayear as part its escalating war 

ot iriflanoit^tfaoi^ »smd kwooldatow 

transpertatwn ad wfceonmiunKMS pip- 

Otina’s cabinet, 1 ^so preared a hxeze on 
loens'io nonstate pnjeets,-tiie csoaue-^t 
urdects without approwd sourceam funds 
and heavier gmdance f or foire^n mvestore. 
People’s Oafly, the pam -aewqiaper^ and. 

Tn (Kder to prevent tatte* emaastooef 
Canstriictum scale, in principle Acre mate 
no new construction pieces approved thus 
year,” .the statement sauL 
Analysis said that would not stop wfldmg 
of raflwavs, power stations and raw maxenus 
Plants atoady appiowdm.tbestateitiaitftil 

§wv sav it could stem thtbuihSng of do* 
' b^ics plants, hotefe and tetaB oompfcres, 

Bosnia Enclave 

<0 ' ■ 


■ 11 IeU-W W* 

2d Crael Winter 


Hosokawa Victory: Still Long Way to Go 

... .. nn«mmr to major shifts in pob’ey long SOI 


By Paul Blustem 

Washwpon Pmt Service 

TOKYO — Now that Japan has made its 
prJitirfli system more democratic and less 

prone to comiption, it stands a better ch3nce of 

malting its economic Systran more opoL, con- 
sumer-driven and import-friendly, analysts say- 


States and some of Japan's other trading part- 
ners have been hoping for. 

But Ae mill ennium is still a long way oil. 
Fundamental change in Japan's economy 
wiD take many years, if it ever come s at alL In 

NEWS ANALYSIS ~~ 


sotered up iwmrt' and pt^ed 
-ifeSsicfedltties id'tiic lHfflts. Tlwse projects, 
'however, usually- ofirar better returns on ciqn- 

taL .r . • ‘ - • • . . . 

Late Sonday, in a report momtored m 
Hone Kcmg^^JaeofScial Xnbuapress agency 
s^dXima would **oontmoe to niject a l^e 
!: amount of toady in key tnmsport and wto 

ctHnmumcations construcOon projects. 

' Fiores just tiade public by the Stiite Star 

ristical Bureau show the budding boom coo- 
•• tinned taubaled- last year despite repeated 

- aaempte by Be8»8 to l 30 ^ **■ . . • 

■ investment in fixed assets last year totaled 
$136 bBSon, an astomteng. 
crease over 1992. with uses in the provinces 
rf Zheuang, Fiijian, Gnangdong, Guangn 
and Hainan — all on the south and east 
coasts — double or aeariy doiMe tire previ- 

7 SeeBLULDING, Page 4 


nner -driven and import-* n eaalj . analysts say- _ . , 


corruption and Sectoral reform measures, 
many analysts say, could mark an important 
step toward achieving the sorts of changes tn 
Japanese economic policy that the United 


source of greater frustration man ever for ine 
Clinton administration. 

In the longer run, however, the political re- 
forms are a helpful and probably necessaiy 



U.S. Will Admit Head of SinnFein 

, , i i*i,4 i/wn Hp. will be allow! 


WASHINGTON (Reuters) — The Unit- 
ed States has granted Gray Adams, bead of 
Sinn Fein, the political wing of the Irish 
Republican Army, permission to attend a 
New York conference this week on North- 
era Ireland, a Clinton administration offi- 
cial said Sunday. 

The official said strict ground rules have 


been laid down. He wBl be allowed to s 
only 48 hours, may not travel more than 
miles (40 kilometers) from New York City, 
and cannot engage in “direct or indirect 
fund-raising," toe official said. 


precursor to major shifts in policy long sought 
bv Washington in its efforts to increase Japa- 
nese imports of goods and services from 

al TTuse shifts in policy include putting a higher 
priority on the interests of consumers, reducing 
bureaucratic interference and control, and low- 
erir^j barriers and regulations that protect pow- 
erful industries and interests. 

James Fallows, author or a recentlv pub- 
lished book on Japan, who has voiced deep 
skepticism in the past about the nation s capac- 
ity to transform itself, said enactment ol the 
political reforms “can be regarded as a step 
forward for the U.S. both in its Jeffersonian 
mode of wanting to promote democracy world- 
wide, and its Mickey Kantor mode. Mr. Khu- 
tor is the U.S. Special Trade Representative. 

What Mr. Fallows and others find most 

See JAPAN, Page 4 


Arafat Sees 
Israel-PLO 
Blueprint 
'Very Soon’ 

Both Sides Are Upbeat 
After Talks in Davos on 
Carrying OutPeace Plan 

By William Drozdiak 

’ Washington Post Service 
DAVOS, Switzerland — Yasser Arafat, the 
PLO chairman, said Sunday after marathon 
talks with Foreign Minister Shimon Peres of 
Israel that the two sides expected to achieve a 
detailed blueprint “very, very scon" on how to 
carry out their historic peace plan. 

Following eight hours of tortuous negotia- 
tions at this Alpine ski resort, Mr. Peres ana 
Mr. Arafat told a gathering of world business 
and political leaders that the negotiators hoped 
to reach a final accord soon. Thai agreement 
would dear the way for Israeli military with- 
drawal and putting into effect Palestinian sell- 
rule in the Gaza Strip and in the West Bank 
town of Jericho. . 

As if to underscore the serious nature o. inor 
intentions, they quickly returned to their hotel 
with their delegations Sunday night in an effort 
to surmount the last obstades. Participants said 
they were eager to wrap up the deal before Mr. 
Peris leaves Monday on a scheduled weeklong 
trip to the United Stales. 

In their joint appearance at the World Eco- 
nomic Forum, the two men displayed a warmth 
and understanding that Israeli and Palestinian 
officials said had blossomed remarkably during 
their encounters last week in Oslo and now in 

Davos. _ ... „i 

Here in the setting of Thomas Mann s novel, 
Mr Peres said, “We both look out in the mom- 
ma on the Magic Mountain, knowing we most 
alro negotiate its slippery heights” represented 
by the “worries, suspicions, hatreds and blood 

of victims." . , , . 

Mr Peres praised Mr. Arafat for making a 
supreme effort to bring our two peoples togeth- 
er in the domain of peace and hope. He said 
after decades of enmity, Israel was now deter- 
mined to make the Palestinian story one of 
“aood neighborhood, peace and hope for toe 
coming generations." 


>ramg ecHcmuiTiis. , , 

Mr. Arafat surprised observers when he ap- 
plauded as the UJ5. undersecretary of state for 
economic affairs and agriculture. Joan Spero, 
called for Arab states to abandon their boycott 
of suppliers to Israel. She called the »woua 
remnant of the past." It was believed to be Mr. 
Arafat’s first public gesture of support to re- 

SC The l pal^huS, leader said he felt touched by 
what he perceived as a sincere desire by Mr. 
Peres to achieve “a lasting peace for the sake ol 
our children and that of future generauons. 
He expressed confidence that "we can over- 
jump all the gaps" so that a final agreement 
could be signed in Cairo soon. 

In the wake of a breakthrough pact on mutu- 
al recognition that was conceived during 
See ACCORD, Page 4 


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Bntj^CiMfliT sJgnrfedtas 

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Organized Crime Clutches 
New Russia by the Throat 


By Celestine Bohlen 

New York Times Service 

MOSCOW — While most Russians are not 
surprised to hear that criminal gangs seem to be 
taking over the country, a top-level government 
report has laid out their reach in stark terms. 
Organized crime has Russia by the throat, 
squeezing the Ufe out of the fledgling private 
sector and holding the government itself bos- 

^^he report, prepared for President Boris N. 
Yeltsin, says 70 to 80 percent of private enter- 
prises and commercial banks in major cities are 
Forced to pay a tribute of 10 to 20 percent ot 
their turnover to organized crime. 

The report estimated that such crime — 
through payoffs, Itickbacks. debt collection, 
money laundering or monopoly pricing ac- 
counts for about a quarter of the inflation rate, 

which last year averaged 20 
In a five-page summary, published last wees 
in the newspaper Izvestia, the report p ve a 
glimpse rf the collusion between criminal gangs 
and local law enforcement- 
In Tver, north of Moscow, the report raid, 

entrepreneurs have to get the gangs permission 
10 open a store or a restaurant. 

Snride Kazan, racketeers luw i begun !o 
extort payoffs from farmers. In St. 
the report estimated, there is an army of 10,000 


full-time hoodlums, of which 500 are consid- 
ered hardened criminals. .. . 

“There is no doubt that the heads of Russian 
organized crime are gathering detailed darners 
OH aD tap-level officials and politicians, said 
the reooru which was prepared by tee .Analyti- 
cal Center for Social and Economic Pohoes^ 
Describing tee pervasiveness ot teeproblem. 
the report continued: "The situation i in our 
country differs from tee situation in Western 
Europe and tee United States. There, orguu^d 
crime controls only ‘criminal activities hie 
prostitution, drugs and gmnolmg. In our c«.un 
try, ii controls all types of activity. 

'This conclusion echoes other reports by Rus- 
sian officials about tee spreading tentacles of 
free-wheeling criminal organizations, roroe ot 
which are said to have links with theW«t. 

Alexander Gurov, who heads a research and 
development institute at tee batenor Muus“£ 
recently said at a business conference teatorga- 
SSd crime has infiltrated Russ?®" banks 
blackmailing, threatening and, in at Ka« * 
dozen cases, killing bankers 10 gain access to 

^LoSvWdated banks have been used to 
launder and embezzle money from siaie and 
commercial accounts, with losses ronmng^ 
hundreds of millions of dollars, tee Interior 

business executives say racketeers get 
Sec RUSSIA, Page 4 



. : Cu^bOirSlpfffimDi90t*B 

. G ARMISCH-PARTENKIRCHEN , Ger- 
many — IHrike MaierVfiante strongly cnti- 
cizedski rffirial&Stmday for what he saw, were 
huaggaeol safety meaaues, and mdicaieathat 
flic fatally planned: to we fa damages. 

Wtirid Cup orgamzas, who defmded their 
safety measures, said the aoddent that killed 

. y . - I-: - iji »tu 


.^^DoumhiU Death, Fiance Faults ^icuUs^lmy'^y^y 

radtbi family lawyer. Sdiwdghofer and UUId "******-■*-*—* 

^TSS«iliM3ame. , death. anv downhill in tee world, said Huben Ostier. 

« - “They only talk about, improving safety but . Theliming device, which registerKl the inter- head of the organizing commutes _ _ 

ts do anythmg,‘ , be said. I cannw- mediale ^ 0 f the racers as they hurtled He ^ ^ the inquiry, by tee Muw^ _s ““ 

that the timine post was padded only .t. nm _ was nadded with straw-filled 1WfKf -«tftr. was routine in fatal accidents and 


60 spots on 


“We were pl annin g to get married in Scptem- 
ber,” Schweif^iofe said, “and now I have to 

carry he* to her grave." 

“It won’t bring UHi back but I intend to fight 
FIS,” he added, referring to the governing m- 


“They 

they never ao anyimng, -- - -r-, -. 
derstand that the timing post was padded only 

Local organizers said tee usual safety mea 


mediate uud vi — — j - .. , 

down tee run. was padded with straw-filled 
sacks, about 50 centimeters thick, according to 




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UH; AUSuUll sun wuw ‘ 

downhifl cause iuthe worid. 

jvfaicr. 26, the two-time vromm's sop er-gma 
slakmi .cham^fflj swerved, 
dammed 4nto a toning donee and hroke her 
Sdudng iLWoddfito downhffl race Snv- 
: dML ^nwd m * rioriby bMpttsl two and a 
.haffhoursiator^v 

J ." The iaateproteeutor opened aninvesnranra 
Ste^ -aito l&iePs death and examined tee 
scene rf tee crash. • 

.. - Hehnut Sdraa^tofer. a policeman who had 
been Ma tea toogrtene hoyfrienf 
tr»rfx yteea he^Stod the sp** with his falher 


V;-' 


9 Killed, 1 Missing in French Alpine Avalanches 

. ^«^nuntrv trek. Also killed in separate avalandus^were a 


Xeum 

GRENOBLE, France — Nine {^pic,Sve 
of teem British doctors, on vacation, 

killed over Uto weekend mawdan^ m ^ 

French Alps, officials said Sunday. 

The Britons were in a group 
' induding a French dri mstnictrf-Etodj ) '^o 

.siia^srisOT 


> 


acne for a daylong cross-country trek. 
Briton, who managed to dig bl ®^L?“ l lhe 

tbe snow and was rescued after spoiding tee 

night in tee open, tee police said. 

to a separate accident, one man uraskfll 
and another was missing after theu. 5 ^ 
maintenance vehicles were swept into Lake 
Mom Cenis before dawn on Sunday. 


Also killed in separate avalanches were a 
French ski instructor, near Courchevd, and a 
German slder, who teed in a Chambery hos- 
pital 

Mountain rescue authorities warned skiers 
to avoid high-altitude cross-country skiing, 
saying recent snow was too loose and further 
avalanches were possible. 


He saia tuai u» uih«“ j. — - - . v . 

prosecutor, was rouune in fatal accidents and 
thatbe emected tee family to sue. But we 
assume we cannot be held responsible for any- 
thing,” he said. 

Maier, a 10-year veteran of the World Cup 
circuit, was racing down tee 2,865-meter Kan- 
dahar course at about 100 kph (60 mph) whra 
she hit a patch rf soft snow about two-thirds « 
the way Sown. Sic lost control of her right ski, 
hit tee timing post with the back of her head, 
which knocked off her helmet, and tumbled 
uncontrollably down the hill appearing to be 
hit by one of her skis that had snapped free. 

Race emergency workers were quickly at her 
They administered mouth-to-mouth restUr 

See SKI, Page 19 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 1994 


Q (L4: ^4 Banker’s Prescription for Europe and Japan 


Thomas <7. Labrecque ; the chair- 
man of Chase Manhattan Corpora- 
tion, has been the driving force behind 
the restructuring of the bank, and an 
advocate of dramatic change by com- 
panies in Europe and Japan. He spoke 
with Alan Friedman of the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune at the World 
Economic Forum in Davos, Skitter- 
land 

Q. The U.S. economy ended 1993 with 
a strong 5.9 percent growth rate in the 
fourth quarter, but continental Europe 
and Japan remain mired in recession. 
What are the essential steps needed to get 
the European and Japanese economies 
moving again? 

A. Too many people in the developed 
world are looking at this recession as a 
normal economic cycle. It is not a normal 
cvcle. It's a secular change. In the United 
States we achieved recovery over the last 
three years without any Fiscal pump- 
priming, but with a gradual relaxation of 
monetary policy that was not inflation- 
ary. At the same time American compa- 
nies engaged in dramatic restructuring to 


become competitive again. I think Eu- 
rope and Japan ore facing the same chal- 
lenges we did and will have to take simi- 
lar steps. 

Q. Here at the Davos conference we 
have heard different views about the need 
for Europe to ait Interest rates faster. 
Hans Tietmeyer. the Bundesbank presi- 
dent, rejected the idea of any rapid easing 
of monetary policy. What is your view? 

A. My sense is that Alan Greenspan 
and the Federal Reserve did a good job of 
lowering rates. I would be more inclined 
to let European interest rates come down 
further, with a downward glide path for 
short-term rates. There appears to be 
room for another hundred basis points of 
reductions, and it is important to keep 
moving. 

• 

Q. The Bundesbank in particular is 
worried about rekindling inflation by 
cutting rates too quickly. Is that a valid 
concern? 

A. 1 am not concerned about the infla- 
tion problem. But 1 would point out that 
reducing interest rates is no good without 
contemporaneous corporate restructur- 


Q. How far ahead of Europe and Ja- 
pan is the U.S. economic cycle? 

A. 1 would say at least two years. In 
1990 and 1991 every U-S. economic pro- 
jection was that we were just about to 
come out of recession and move into 
recovery within two or three quarters. 
But it took two and a half years. 

Q. What then are the lessons Europe 
can learn from the American experience? 

A. Since the middle of 1990 we at 
Chase have reduced our work fence by 25 
percent and boosted revenues by 35 per- 
cent. Big American industrial companies 
have been cutting their staff numbers, 
too. We are talking about dramatic 
change here, about the need for less peo- 
ple at all levels, including middle and 
upper manag ement. There is no way for 
Europe and Japan to avoid streamlining 
and dramatic corporate restructuring. 

Q. Yet many in Europe contend there 
are more structural problems, and more 
social resistance to massive job cuts. How 
do you respond to this? 

A. There certainly are differences in 
terms of the safety net and the historical 
structure in Europe. But the rest of the 


world won’t wait, and restructuring can t 
be done half way. The Europeans can be 
as innovative as anybody if they under- 
stand the need. 

Q. Has that level of understanding 
bem reached in Europe? 

A. On balance I don't think the con- 
sensus has been reached. I still see people 
trying to find short-term solutions. There 
are still too many people who think they 
don’t have to change. The comment that 
Europe has more structural problems 
may be true, but that doesn't change the 
reality. And the Europeans and Japanese 
don’t always want to hear it. It’s a diffi- 
cult message. 

• 

Q. Oo Friday, BankAmerica Corpora- 
tion agreed to buy Continental Bank of 
Chicago for S1.9 bflKon. What is the 
significance of the deal? 

A. What is going on is that the Ameri- 
can financial services industry is continu- 
ing to evolve, io take out excess capacity. 
You’re going to see more mergers, more 
acquisitions and more consolidation. The 
BankAmerica deal is an example of this 
process, although it will be done in three 
different ways. Some deals will result in 


wholesale-oriented banks like J. P. Mor- 
gan, others win lead to national consum- 
er finance companies, and then you wiD 
see the purely regional hanks. The U5. 
banking system is now competing with 
all aspects of financial services. 

Q. Among the major topics of discus- 
sion here at Davos is the parlous state of 
die Russian economy. Citicorp, your 
competitor, recently opened a fid) branch 
operation in Moscow. What are Chase 
Manhattan's plans? 

A. We have a branch license and we 
will convert our representative office to a 
full branch this spring. But I expect to 
grow slowly is Russia and mainly serve 
oar American customers there, along 
with some project finance. 

Q. Have political developments in 
Russia and the apparent setback in re- 
form efforts given you reason for con- 
cern? 

A. Anything that sets back movement 
toward a market economy and the drive 
to reduce Russian inflation hurts. We are 
trying very hard to convince the Russians 
to move faster toward a market economy, 
and f think we might get there. 


U.S. Expedition in Somalia: The Making of a Disaster 


By Rick Atkinson 

Washington Past Service 

MOGADISHU, Somalia — The beating blades 
swept in from the north, churning great dust clouds 
that soon obscured the whitewashed gleam of the 
Olympic Hotel, 50 yards down Hhvadag Street from 
the target building.' American soldiers leaped to the 
ground and ran toward the side gate of the compound. 

Ahmed Warsame had just Finished his afternoon 
prayers when he heard the helicopters. The 44-year- 
old. Italian -educated economist scrambled to his feet 
and peered out the second-story window. The other 
Somalis in the room, all loyal followers of the fugitive 
Somali militia leader Mohammed Farrah Aidid, dart- 
ed in panic toward the window and then down the 

First of two articles. 

stairs before being driven back by the approaching 
soldiers. It was 3:40 PM. on Oct 3. 

Within 15 minutes, the assault was Finished. A total 
of 20 Delta Force commandos in black body armor 
swept through the rooms, bellowing orders and shov- 
ing the Somalis together with their rifle butts. A 
soldier forced Mr. Warsame face-down onto (he green 
tile floor and lashed his hands behind his back with 
plastic cuffs. Prodded down the stairs, he was herded 
with 23 other captives into a courtyard. 

A Della soldier spoke the word “Laurie" into his 
radio, giving the code that indicated ail prisoners were 
secured. The Americans were ready to leave. 

Yet, as the world soon learned, it was far from over. 
An additional 1 5 hours would elapse before the Amer- 
icans would reach safety. By that time. 18 American 
soldiers would be dead and more than SO wounded in 
a ferocious Firelight with General Aidid’s forces. So- 
mali casualties would exceed 1.000. The American 
public, hardly aware the country was at war. clamored 
for an explanation. President Bill Clinton soon aban- 
doned the manhunt for General Aidid and announced 
the withdrawal of all U.S. forces by the end of March. 

This two-part series tries to answer many of the 
lingering questions surrounding the flawed American 
expedition in Somalia, including the role of Delta 
Force, the successes and failures of U.S. intelligence in 
Mogadishu, and the fateful decisions on which so 
many lives hinged. 

The articles also detail the Somali perspective: the 
strategic preparations by General Aidid’s militia lead- 
ers and countermoves to U.S. military tactics. 

Close examination of the mission suggests that 
virtually all American commanders underestimated 
General Aidid's firepower. 

The battle of Oct 3 and 4 is a tale of miscalculation, 
bad luck and extraordinary personal valor by those in 
the fight Those 15 hours contained the most intense 
combat by U.S. infantrymen since Vietnam, with 
consequences that immediately altered U.S. policy 
toward Somalia and are likely to shape American 
involvement in future foreign entanglements, either 
under a UN banner or otherwise. 

Delta Force was alerted to begin preparations for a 


Somalia mission shortly after an ambush on June 5 
that left 24 Pakistani soldiers dead in Mogadishu, 
followed the next day by a UN Security Council 
resolution to apprehend “those responsible." On June 
17, the UN operation in Somalia issued an arrest order 
for the chief suspect. General Aidid, who went into 
hiding. 

The warning order to Delta Force, according to 
army sources, was routed to Major General William F. 
Garrison, commander of the Joint Special Operations 
Command at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, after con- 
sultations between General Wayne A. Downing, over- 
all commander of U.S. special operations, and Gener- 
al Joseph P. Hoar, whose Central Command had 
responsibility for U.S. forces in Somalia. 

Delta’s initial plan, code-named “Caustic Brim- 
stone," called Tor a relatively small force of 50 com- 
mandos to be deployed to Mogadishu on a single C- 
141 transport plane. 

By August in a plan code-named "Gothic Serpent" 
the proposed force included about 130 commandos 
from Delia's C Squadron, a Ranger company and 16 
helicopters from Task Force 160, the 3110 /$ special 
operations aviation unit. After four American soldiers 
were killed in Mogadishu by a command-detonated 
mine on Aug. 8, these 400 troops, collectively dubbed 
Task Force Ranger, were ordered 10 Somalia by Mr. 
Clinton. Delia's participation remained classified. 

To track General Aidid, the Central Intelligence 
Agency had about 20 principal Somali agents operat- 
ing in tbe city, along with a wide network of lesser 
informants, according to military sources. 

Most of these agents seemed to work only during 
the day. however. Apparently afraid to venture into 
Mogadishu’s dangerous streets after sunset, they rare- 
ly provided “actionable intelligence" at night, when 
Delta preferred to operate. 

On Sept 7. frustrated by the paucity of useful 
intelligence. General Garrison authorized Phase 
Three, broadening the hunt to include “ Tier One 
targets," as General Aidid’s six lieutenants were 
known. 

Each mission was built around a basic “template": 
Delta commandos would storm the target building; 
Rangers would ring the target for security, and heli- 
copters would loiter overhead to control crowds and 
provide fire as needed. Variations were adapted in an 
attempt to keep General Aidid's militia off-balance, 
such as launching some missions at night while others 
went in daylight. Task Force Ranger frequently sent 
bogus “signature flights" from the airfield to mislead 
spies. 

Sucb efforts tried to compensate for tbe loss of 
strategic surprise, usually Delta’s most vital asset. 
Despite attempts to vary the missions, a pattern had 
been established before Oct 3 

General Aidid's Somali National Alliance militia 
bad been developing a template of its own. 

South Mogadishu had been carved into 18 military 
sectors, each with a duty officer on alert at all times. A 
crude radio network tied than together. Although UN 
intelligence estimated that General Aidid had approx- 





Grj MatwkVTbc Aoodaud Prat 

A U.S. Anny soldier saluting a colonel while leaving the country from tbe Mogadishu port on Sunday. 


mutely 1,000 militia “regulars,” Aidid officials put the 
number at closer to 12.000. Hundreds of rocket-pro- 
pelled grenades bad been stockpiled. 

The tactical commander who would oversee tbe 
Oct 3 battle was a tall, mustachioed 45-year-old 
artillery officer who bad commanded a brigade in tbe 
Somali army before throwing in his lot with General 
Aidid in 1991. 

Colonel Sharif Hassan Giumale had finished high 
school in Mogadishu in 1969, attended a Soviet mili- 
tary academy in Odessa for three years and received 
further training in Italy in 1989. 

His concept was simple: Task Force Ranger 
stressed speed, so the militia had to react more quick- 
ly. The Americans' greatest technological advantage 
— helicopters — had to be neutralized with barrage 
fire using rocket-propelled grenades. The attacking 
force must be surrounded and its superior firepower 
offset by sheer numbers and swarming persistence. 
Ambushes and barricades would try to impede Ameri- 
can reinforcements. 

At 1 P.M. on Oct 3, a Somali agent reported that 
General Aidid's lieutenants would meet near the 
Olympic Hotel. The gathering would include two Tier 
One targets: Omar Salad El mi and Mohamed Hassan 
A wale. Ranger planners began plotting the mission. A 


Hughes 530 reconnaissance helicopter crew watched 
with a telescopic lens as the agent indicated the target 
building with a prearranged signal: He stopped bis 
car, left Ihe door open, raised the hood, lowered the 
hood, then drove on. 

Shortly before 3 P.M., Major General Thomas M. 
Montgomery, commander of U.S. forces in Mogadi- 
shu returned from a visit to western Somalia to find a 


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Los Angles Cfi WW9 J 


Armenia Blast Wonods 2 

The Associated Press 

YEREVAN. Armenia — At least 
two people were wounded Satur- 
day when a bomb exploded under a 
passenger train from Georgia — 
the second rail blast in a week in an 
area populated mainly by ethnic 
Azerbaijanis. Armenia and Azer- 
baijan have been at war for six 
years over Nagorno-Karabakh. 


William Levitt Dies, Mass Home Builder 


3icralb3»ibunc 

ri*M<ATb v,m 

LIVING IN THE U.S.? 

NOW PRINTED DV 

New vork 
For Same day 

DELIVERY IN KEY CITIES 

TO SUBSCRIBE, CALL 

1 - 800-882 2884 

(IN NEW YORK, CALL 212-752-3890) 


.Vrw York Tima Service 

NEW YORK —William Levitt. 
86, the New York developer who 
built the prototype for the suburbs 
that would lure middle-dass Amer- 
icans out of cities by the millions 
after World War IL died of a pro- 

E ive kidney disease Friday 
1 asset. New York. 

In 1947, he created Levittown. 
New York, where in the next four 
years, his firm, Levitt & Sons, built 
more than 17.000 cheap, nearly 
identical 800-square-foot bouses, 
which sold for as little as 57.990. 

The community’s houses were 
built much like cars on an assembly 
line. They were viewed by many as 
a modern marvel, a deliverance for 
GIs returning from war and other 
young adults who normally could 
not have afforded suburban homes. 

To others, it was the insidious 
archetype of a dehumanizing world 
of uniformity. In Levittown's early 
years, some of its residents repaint- 
ed their bouses in odd color combi- 
nations to distinguish them from 
others in the neighborhood. 

Still, Mr. Levitt was proud of his 
innovations, which allowed his 


workmen to build as many as 36 
houses a day on the design created 
by his brother, Alfred. 

“What it amounted to was a re- 
versal of tbe Detroit assembly 
line,” he said in a 1989 interview. 
“There, the car moved while the 
workers stayed at their stations. In 
tbe case of our houses, it was the 
workers who moved, doing the 
same jobs at different locations. To 
the best of my knowledge, no one 
had ever done that before." 

Mr. Levitt went on to other pro- 
jects and to fabulous wealth. In 
1968. he sold Levitt & Sons to in- 
ternational Telephone and Tele- 
graph for S92 million. He lost much 
of his wealth in the 1970s and 1980s 
in buaness deals gone sour. 

Nonetheless, in 1985 Mr. Levitt 
and his father and brother, who 
were associated with him for much 
of his career, were called by a noted 
urban historian, Kenneth Jackson, 
tbe family that had the greatest 
impact on postwar bousing in the 
United States. 

Tbe company was an innovator 
in the design and construction of 
relatively inexpensive single-family 


houses. It made a mark in the lay- 
out of suburban communities, cre- 
ating immense — and, some critics 
said, monotonous — patterns of 
houses. It developed quids and 
cost-efficient house-construction 
techniques, making much use of 
prefabricated components. And its 
building helped shape ways of liv- 
ing in the suburbs. 

Reuben Mattus, 81, Creator 
Of Hiagen-Dazs Ice Cream 

DEERFIELD BEACH, Florida 
(AFP) — Reuben Maitus, 81, who 
sold icecream from a horse-drawn 
wagon before creating the Hflagen- 
Dazs name that became an interna- 
tional success, died of a heart 81 - 
tack Thursday while vacationing 
here. 

Mr. Maitus sold homemade ice 
cream to small shops in the Bronx 
for 30 years before dreaming up the 
name H£agen-Dazs. He figured 
New Yorkers would buy ice cream 
with an odd-sounding name. Tbe 
name, which meant nothing in any 
language, grew into a national pre- 
mium brand before Mr. Mattus 
sold it to PiUsbury in 1983. 

“When I came but with H5ageu- 


Dazs, the quality of ice cream had 
deteriorated to the point where h 
was just sweet and cold," he said 
recently. “Ice cream had became 
cheaper and cheaper, so I just went 
the other way." 

Bahfat TaJhouni of Jordan, 
82, 8- Time Prime Minister 

AMMAN, Jordan (AP) — Bab- 
jat Talhouni, 82, who served as 
prime minisier eight times between 
1958 and 1970 ami was considered 
a founder of modem Jordan, died 
Sunday, tbe government said. 

Prime Minister Abdnl SaZam 
MajaH paid tribute to Mr. Tal- 
houni, who also served as chief of 
the royal court. At the time of his 
death be was a member of die up- 

byKing HusK^ a,n<?nt ^P 0 * 11 

Zaireans Flee Troops 

Reuters 

NAIROBI — More than 800 
Zaireans have fled into western 
Uganda to escape attacks by ram- 
paging government troops, Ugan- 
dan oflfidals said Sunday. 


WORLD BR1EF S__ 

Atmosphere Tense in Crimea 

SIMFEROPOL, Ukraine (AP) - 

presidential elections amid womes that a victory by a pro-w**® 
candidate could threaten who & bv political 

The runoff ejection pits Yun * framer Cbmmuaist. 

movements favoring unity with *Ss«^SOTlatoremain pan of 

sSSSSeS&KS 

SHESBMiiHHSSS 

ssasss ss^kksskss: 

17J percent Neither received the 50 percent needed for victory. 

Berlin Protesters Stone Policemen 

BONN (Reuters) — Left-wing protests 
policemen in Bonn banned a far-nghi rally called to mark thebist 
anniversary of Hitler’s rise to powerTthc German P®®***^^ 
^Snonstratora took to the streets of BerfiH over the weekend, dewing 
stones at policemen and smearing buildings with paint a protest 
against Gennany’s resurgent far-right groups 

Sowing radicals. A Berlin police spokesman said two police officers 
were hurt and four militant Wrists were arreted on Sati™jy- 
On Sunday, about 1,000 people answered a cafl 
Communist PDS party, successor to East Germany’s hard-jmeCOTiroo- 
nists, to protest against murder threats from neo-Nazi, radicals against 
viators to a reform office in a Berlin suburb. 

Mandela (Mis for Peaceful Campaign 

RUSTENBURG, Sooth Africa (Reutere)^^Manddaui^dfcs 

African National Congress followers on Sunday to anew Presideni 
Fredsrik W. de Klerk and bis National Party to campaign freely in war* 

townships for the April elections. . , . _ .. 

“1 appeal to vou not to harass him or members of bis organization u 
they warn to have meetings in our townships." he said. “I donY want that 
party, when they lose the election, to say they wot unaWe to pm then 
view to the public because of the activities of the AN C. Heim speaking 
to about 6,000 people at a campaign rally in Rustenburg, m the western 

TransvaaL • • , , 

Several attempts by the National Party and the predominantly wtoe 
liberal Democratic Party to hold township election meetings have been 
disrupted by angry youths. The hostilities prevented Mr. de Klerk riom 
touring two Mack townships in the western Transvaal and western Cape 0 


Task Force Ranger officer wailing at the UN com- 
pound with a book of aerial photographs and a de- 
scription of the mission. “Bill," General Montgomery 
tola General Garrison in a quick phone call to tbe 
airfield, “that’s really Indian country. That's a bad 
place.” 

General Garrison knew that. For the first time, he 
had ordered his AH-6 Little Bird attack helicopters to 
carry rockets as well as machine-gun ammunition and 
to shoot threatening Somali gunmen rather than give 
them a chance to surrender. 

At 3:40 P.M., four MH-6 Little Birds swooped into 
the streets around the building. As Delta troops 
rushed into the budding. Ranges fast-roped from 
their UH-6G Black Hawks and established blocking 
positions around the compound’s four corners. 

Delta troops marshaled tbe Somali prisoners — 
including Mr. A wale, Mr. Salad Bmi and the terrified 
Ahmed Warsame — in the courtyard. Because the 
streets were too narrow to land the larger Black 
Hawks, the Americans and their captives, known 
collectively as “PC,” for “precious cargo," would be 
extracted by a 12-vehicle convoy. 

A Delta officer radioed the C Squadron command- 
er, a lientenani coloneL who was watching from a 
command-and-conlrol helicopter overhead. “Hey. 
boss, 1 think we’ve got tbe guys you sent us in for." . 

But almost immediately another radio call sent a 
chill through those listening. From the cockpit of tbe 
Black Hawk designated Super 6-1 came a distress call 
from the pilot: “Sx-One’s gong down! Six-Oik’s 
going down!" 

NEXT: The 15-hour battle 


Cambodians Hit Khmer Rouge Base 

PHNOM PENH (Reuters) —Tbe Cambodian Anny has started a 

campaign to capture a key Khmer Rouge base at northern AnloogVcng, 

but so far fighting is on a small scale. Defense Minister General Tea Banh 
said Sunday. 

*TTns is not a big nriUtaiy operation — us just troop movement to 
reoonnoiter the geography," General Tea Banh said. He said government 
military activity around Antin g Veug had increased since the middle of 
January, but declined to say how dose government soldiers had ap- 
proached to Anlong Veng. _ „ , 

Anlong Veng lies 3 10 kflometerc (220 miles) northwest of Phnom Penh, 
and has served as tire Khmer Rouge’s key northern headquarters. 

Japan Reported Near Nudear Status 

LONDON (AP) — Japan has acquired all the pacts needed to ' make a 
mid ear weapon and may have bufll a bomb that requires only plutonium 
to be completed. The Sunday Trines repotted. The Ministry of Defense 
has warned Prime Minuter John Major that North Korea’s nuclear 
program may force Japan to abandon its nommdear stance, the newspa- 
per said. 

The risks were detailed in a paper to the Joint InteGigeoce Committee, 
the government’s nwfai security adviser to tbe cabinet. The Sunday Times 
said. Neither the Japanese nor tire British government had any comment 
on the report. It says that Japan has bomb^naking components i ndoding 
- phttnrrinm and electronic triggers “and has tbe expertise to go nu de ar 
very quickly." 

IJ.S. Troops Stir Anger in Colombia 

BOGOTA (Reuters) — Americans bvba in Colombia fear that they 
could become targets for reprisal attacks byMantist guerrillas lashing out 
against the presence of 150 ILS.' troops in the country's southwest. 
Western diplomats say. \ , 

“Americans are very worried about the possibility of guerrilla attacks 
on UJS. targets over the troops issue," a diplomat said. The State 
Department wamed Ameocans this week against traveling to Colombia. 
“ReoeQt attacks have been targeted agaiim American citizens and Ameri- 
can institutions," it said. 

The American soldiers arrived in Colombia in December on a training 
assignment to build a school, health dime and road in the poor Pacific 
coast town of Juanchaco. Bui their arrival raised nationalist protest 
Leftist politicians, onion leaders and some newspapcryhsve accused the 
Americans of planning covert actions against drug traffickers m Call 

For the Record 

Peter Leko of Hungary, M, became tbe youngest chess grandmaster in 
history Sunday, finishing thud in the elite Wgk aan- Zee grandmasters 
tournament (Reuters) 


third in the elite Wijk aan- Zee grandmasters 

(Reuters) 


TRAVEL UPDATE 

Snow Socks Greek Towns, Port Shut 

ATHENS (AP) — - Gale-force winds whipped through the Aegean Sea 
keeping ships in port on Sunday and -snowstorms trapped scores of 
vjJlages in northern Greece. ..... . 

Winds reaching gale-force velocity in the Aegean forced ships to 
remain m port, leaving passengers cm islands stranded. The cold weather 
caught many Greeks by surprise and sharply contrasted with the mfld 
temperatures that Greece has been experiencing since November. 

The snowstorms in the north left roads blocked to scores of villages. 
Extra sikw removal equipment was sent to the areas. Many of Athens's 
northern suburbs were also blanketed with snow, making driving hazard- 
ous. 

Paris’s Georges Pompidou Center is in serious need of repairs, accord- 
ing to its director; Dominique Akhiy.She said that after 17 years and teas 
of thousands of visiftss, it needs about $68 nuQkm in repairs. (AP) 


unHuiwo urn UIC JMHiyaui IWU1U WIT [UH OOBU5, newspapers 

reported Sunday in Adams. The death toll rose to 2,002 deaths last year, 
up from 1,760 deaths in 1992. In around 70 percent of accident^ 
motorists had broken the law, according to apoEoesurveyof the Athens 

«S«®- . ' ...I ..... . .. (AFP) 

Brand’s state-owned Royal Board Airimes has boqgfeft twoFokker-50 
regional projects from the manufacturer to fly be t w ee n - Brunei and 
Maiayaan and Phihppmeatics. (Reuters) 

This Week’s Holidays 

, Basking and government offices wffl be dosed « services curtailed in 
the following countries and their dependencies tins week of 

national and religious holidays: 

WED NESDAY: Ucd me a s tcm- 

THURSDAY: Mozambique.. - .. 

FRIDAY: Angola, Sri 

SATURDAY: Burundi, Mexico, Tanzania. 

Sources: JJ*. Morgan, Reuters. 



With MC! CALL USA and MCI WORLD REACH services, 
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For heaven's sake, Grace, I know it's easy. 
But ya gotta stop talking up a storm. 


. - 

’Cu’jr.tr. .KKonrur. canng rrvj, nor te aw*uor co & tiro all MO CALL USA Kxatiorc Own resncuora -War tor seam oat iok itan m' .n h. , 

W-en «i 5 oe G*o. aw W hr* nvn-.-n .imw* mw» 0* L«na. ire win a **) ■ loiwu adtabley "Corea cans m US mV ™ ES 
In sy*? wwrin xiBbc pnonn o?C 05 't of cun <f pr*jne can* for der raw ^Senate Worn pubic letetmor&noy ^ 

Rate ‘lecend^ on caH Oiigin « r-lewo nsw^esailatue on a unnedtuasm eastern OermanyCi MO mrenunanai,i« 1995 
Mp- ^ «*•*• f-tfi pnu-K.s and WWW ffentwo nwpn. av prop scary marks of MQ Commwcauore Qyporanm . - 



’Si. 

1 'It. 



Imprimc per Offpruu. 73 rue de I’Evangile. 750 tH Paris. 





• 




mr.BfclJ? -nUBUWE, MONDAY, JAMJABY 31, 1994 

<sn w. v-r-tfL 







S.P^,S! 

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* POLITICAL MITES* 


White 



disaster requires urgpm r r~^ [ ^ d ; 

■3fr3£E2sgs aSsysSSSsF 

-sgaffgstsr^— — 

„rjv under 13 S. command. .w. operation, the less hkdy that U-p-, ”P? involvement in them. 

^Tbcnew Emdefinea. aproduct of along review, are a UN command, an official said. . _ -» — J — '«'» " f «“* 

sharp derrarture from the early days of TT» main prmaples of ih« 

arimmistratkm. _ _'• - . _ L __, Presidential D <^ot Direct 


WASHINGTON —ThcnatiMi’aieayrcare 
wobfems*. that, need reform, bat they dp 
according to the Senate Republican kato; Bob Wed RjSfSr » 
tTIS we're making too much ovct ; whether this ia- a oias or a 
add. dotf twant tog* mto a fight 

over whether there is ajsobkm or a crisis. ^ 

system is in. crisis and needs riiajor change. ; -v;^- -.1 ' • 

TBnHir'aD interview with Kansas radio 


has “serious 
"’"as' a crias," 


lines, a product oi ajou* ,s ojaced under u n coajuam*. ~‘rr , _ j-f , • yhc command ana control oi wm «. 

re from the early days of the ^nain pgges in • Tte roles of regional oranBauaB. 

m mi auaw* nminn had called for the Presidential Bm biidi-levd approval was • Steps to improve 

fefon: Dep^t ofS- peecekeepms- 


tlvemeni in mem. 

The command and control of such operauoos. 

•w i ,r «nnnil nreanizauons. 

management of 


The United Stales would have to oe 

have to have broad support in Congress- 
Washington would also require that estimates^ for 

:£i££!S§=£e 

SSSide^but Wellington would never surrender 
its ultimate authority. 


creation of a small r - 
force" for UN missioos. 


des, 

unless uongrcs* nppiu»«» j^rr 1 

and Transportation 

as Um 0§§? of Perscmnd 

Sycfis, the officials said, pmnanly because of npt.mff; ““ 
fiscal year 1995, wfaiA li.dne pot Jglfc^Si TBti nher Edley. 

f ^SSk'Sm^ 

Hetttd it wold be. b7m3^. 

histone lows, feaiMcf ialoffl their chances m 

■ “%fSSS:5«“S 


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jCdtvnvv^ uifr 

Baio in the Mirror. Departure 
- ty Reflects u '" 


\ 


7% i, , 3 - . 

MM 

nil . 


i m$M 



By Datdd Johnston. 

Yew York Tims Service 

WASHINGTON — Attorney 
General Janet Reno’s decision w 
jettison her deputy seemed to be at 
least partly an attempt to answer 
rising criticism of her own pcn°^‘ 
nance by dismissing a high-rank- 
ing subordinate. , 

But whether the rep acemml of 
Philip Heymann, the No. 2 official 
at the Justice Department, wul 

JE^ANAWSIS 

sively through the first year erf the 
rim inn adminis tration is uncer- 

ta Ms. Reno’s aides said she had 
lost patience with Mr. Heymann s 
approach and was concentrating 
on finding a decisive, seasoned pro- 
fessional to succeed him. 

But other officials at the JustK* 


dais say Ms. Reno works hard, but 

Sfnoi'yet mastered themi^on 

from Dade County prosecutor to 

“SSCSc— 

vides them insufficient guidance 

253SSftS«»S 

S^«shSi«mi«ion,y e ll 0 « 

of Ms. R=nosaysfe 

has faced a daunting array of issues 


»,^G£. V I -.-Iwsjfc ^ .gj 


W^t : 





i„, . Utfomkh/TTlt Aiwcaxsl Pf°P 

, „ a atrial m tato* At left fe Ws ttoraey, MictadBurt. 


hyte iwaiww — “ — o — 

Retrial Is Vowed in Parents’ Murder 

” J -f-—.ft«-vaars of sexual and emotional abuse 


nut uuici — . 

Department, who spoke on condi- 
tion of anonymity, said some of the 
managerial problems at the depart- 
ment were not entirdv the fault of 
Mr. Heymann, who left Thursday. 

These officials say Ms. Rrao has 
seemed indecisive, losing f°cuj^ 
taking on too many uoje^h^- 

?asss»5 

SihasTS^f Of 90.S) peop^ 

W Srlnals. indiums »roe 


By SethMydans 

: r. ; ' . . . ' '• Hew York Times Serriee _ 

■ 5£iS23fSF8 

SHgi&JRWSR* 

murder case, : Mr- Wfra ^ ^ mfliion. We 

iswbat we aregoinjto 
^ S^tedamnS with how much money itis going 

1 °. coslM «Ll Mb -ides said the balance could tip 

WeSBrjarasas 


,o»W the 

«^s“saa-«--> 

Lyle and Erik Menendez 

£ P^i°.“v thE case of the older brother, Lyle, 26, 

. • ^“ JW7 

deadlocked m the ion i rfEjt23. ^ ^ 

■Jswg^SStassa 

mew Aug. 20. 

divided over Whether 
that crime constituted ®^der. de - 

ASSSfett 


SSSrSSS 

SssaiSEgSf 

ia^ss 

J^aessssss 


whcTsay they hope she succeeds, 
insist that the public 


insist mat m*= puuuw impresaion of 
Ms. Reno as the gutsy 

prosecutor who 

for the tear gas assault in Waco, 
Texas, last April is at odds with the 
attorney general they see on day- 

to-day basis. 

Current and former career offi- 


' Erik’s case, lawyws wy ~~~ 

a5!S3Ms«s! 

fdt he was.” 


Must U.S . 
Offer Jobs to 

2.3 Million? 

By Jason DeParle 

^ yoHc TT-ths Srwwr 

WASHINGTON - Pre»dtt 
Bill Clinton's pledge to make wel- 
fare recipients work could 
much larger pubbe jobs program 
than prewously acknowledged, ac- 
cording to a confidential paper that 
is tbesubject of sharp dispute in- 1 
side the administration. 


that went unsolved under 12 years 
of Republican control at the Justice 

D ^S 1 Sfirials say her inapaj- 
ence in federal issues and to late 
start as President Bill Clinton s 
third choice for the job meant 
faced a bigger job than most cabi- 
net members. 

Carl Stem, a spokesman for the 
department, said Ms. Waer . nMtfea 
stronR manager as her deputy oe- 

SS?£r3ta id® od ■ 

pursuing a course that has made 
die agency busier than at any tunc 
since Timmy Carter's presidency. 

“This is a very active place, he 
arid -Tteo 

going on since Gnffin Beu, mx. 
Carter’s attorney genwaL 
Ms. Reno has also been ^““t" 
ed by the tmMHxmsummg effort to 
assemble her team. V^afoAy n 
crucial areas like the civil nghtsmd 
environment divisions, where 
Democrats had hoped dwChn^J 
administration would make quick 
and solid advances. 

At times, what Ms. Reno’s aides 
interpreted as an rffoit to respond 
to public concern has been viewed 
by lawyers at the department as 
caving in to political pressure. 

In one instance, Ms. Reno and 
her civti rights aides spent months 
reviewing whether to pursue a fed- 
. , invActieation m the 


oi loon p.ui>vw,itors and politi- 
I leaders from New York. 

Earlier this week, she announced 
that she was reversing her poshon 
again, and would convene a federal 
Sand jury in the case. Her aaucs in 
^department said her twists.and 

turn/made her appearmdeoave. 

Ms. Reno's aides said her deci- 
sion reflected an auempt to dem- 
onstrate that the government 

would make every, eft 011 w bnng 

wrongdoers to justice. . 

Acc us ations of mdeasrveness 
also trailed her decision to appoint 
an independent prosecutor to in- 
vestigatethe Whitewater rase m- 

volvrng Mr. Clinton s AJanMS 
real eftate dealings- Her danaon 
led to the appointment of Robert 
Rske Jr. a Republican who is a 
former U.S. attorney. 

Her derision foDowed w^s m 
which she dismissed the idea of 
bulging in someone fromouunde 
to take over the Justice Depart- 
man's investigation . 

me she named could be viewed as 

“WSS55* -ss- 

afwr Mr. Clinton made the request. 

At least part of the aura of con- 
fusion stems from 
complaints about Ms. Reno at the 

White House. ... 

Some Clinton aides enuozed to 

Sffiaa: , ?sgs 

Mr. Clinton has tried to strike a 
tougher tone. 



InqnnyinBabyDealiM 

The Associated Pros 

RIO DE JANEIRO — TOrty- 
five newborn babies died during 
tire last two months of infection 
contracted at two hospitals in Sao 
Paulo, a Brazilian newspaper re- 

P< ^mawsm ty wards at the hos- 
pitals were dosed for “W estt f5*‘ 
Sons, the Rio daily O Globo said. 

[ To subscribe In Germany 
1 lust call/ toll fr—v 
013084 85 85 





ssfessssas 

ssty.and a rraatfs ^ y^tore a 
Tbe nms^? Ladies' Inaugural 


a MHer asks Jn** Martin, who writes the 
SLSor leave it to the answering ma- 

— ^Sa&ss* 




Human serviw suggests --^,- 
many as 2J million people could 
abject to the work reqmre-, 
ments when the programispuimm 1 
effect. To put them all to work 
would require three to four times 
the number or jobs the a dmn nsira- 

■IlSSsSSSP^ 

the computer prelection greatly en- 
aggerated the problem. 

One officiaL giving what .he 

sjsaasw jsbss 

^ But otto analysts have called 
the estimate of 2.3 3,111100 ,? 
benchmark that fflustrates the dtffi- 
Sty President Clinton races as he 
su^gles to fulfill a popular cam- 

P iS. P C^^n vowed last wedeto 

send Congress a biB this spring tha 

rnr welfare recroients and reqimc 

those still on ihe rolls alter m> 

vears to join a work program. The 
op^nment would atto 
private jobs or provide cornmumty 
«rvi« positions in the pudu. sec- 
tor Thcjobs would probably pa. 

^Sftunder pressure 
to prffiwi* to welfare pi£ 
„ even though many m the 
Snstration fear that tten^e 
will bring a fractious congressiona. 

and may stall the debate over 

universal health care. , f 

The paper suggesting the need for 
2 J nnEjobs has not arodated 
Songmoaofthe32m^tosrf 

STwriting group dm&d w«h 
drafting the welfare P lan :A^ 

<fisc0SS ed at a deoarmieital 

^Hand dSi^d by anoffioj 

who opposes the weffk proE™®; 
Sg Sit could cost a lot Cf 
money without hriping poor people. 


We fly to 
the Far East 
more often 
than any 
other airline. 



Sinwrc Airline? offers yon 41 fligh- f™« 1J 
European ei.ies .0 Singapore every rveek. All eonnec. >0 
3(10 fliRhrs ro .he Far Easr. Aus.ral.a and Neo- 
Zealand. and of course, all have .nfligh. serviee even 
other airlines talk about. cnfiAPORE AIRUPES, 



/ 




t>* 


Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 31. 1994 


JAPAN: Reform. Is on the Way, but Millennium Is Still a Long Way Off 


promising about the reforms is the increased 
likelihood that a system of two or three.raajor 
parties will emerge, with at least one bidding for 
power by appealing to urban dwellers, consum- 
ers and other groups that feel their living stan- 
dards have been sacrificed during Japan's post- 
war race to industrialize 

Up to last summer, the government had been 
controlled for 38 years by the Liberal Demo- 
cratic Party, with its strong ties to industry, 
fanners, small shopkeepers and other interests. 
The current ruling coalition is a patchwork of 
right smaller parties with widely divergent 
agendas. 

“What wiQ happen in the long run is the 
oration of a major moderate party that repre- 
sents mainstream citizens’ values,” Kuniko In- 
ogachi, a professor at Sophia University, pre- 
dicted. “It will be for the consumer, and for 
deregulation.” 

The reforms help engender such an outcome 
by scrapping the rules under which electoral 
districts would send as many as four or five 
members of parliament to the Diet, or parlia- 
ment. 

Those old Riles were widely criticized as anti- 


democratic because they tended to make ejec- 
tion campaigns devoid of policy debates. The 
incentives favored the practice of “money poli- 
tics," in which several Liberal Democrats 
would compete against each other for Office by 
doling out favors to constituents and contribu- 
tors. 

Under the new rules, several important 
changes will take place. 

Fust, urban areas will get substantially more 
representation than in the past, when rural 
districts have enjoyed a hugely dispropoitional 
number of seats. 

Second, controls on corporate campaign con- 
tributions will be tightened substantially, 
though this provision was watered down in a 
last-minute compromise. 

Third, and perhaps most important, the 
mulriseal districts will be replaced with a sys- 
tem in which 300 Diet seats will be chosen from 
angle-member districts, and the other 200 seats 
divided up according to the number of votes 
each party receives. Political scientists say they 
believe such rules give the existing parties the 
incentive to realign themselves into two or three 
big blocs, each one capable of winning control 
of the government. 


Moreover, the new rules should gradually 
curb the phenomenon of powerful Diet zoku, or 
tribes, which join with bureaucrats to protect 
and influence key industries. 

The resolution of the political reform issue 
also enables Prime Minister Morihiro Ho- 
sokawa to turn his attention to his long-cher- 
ished goal of scrapping regulations and curbing 
the enormous influence of the elite cavil service. 

The prime ministers initial forays against 


with a highly touted advisory panel handing m 
a list of ideas for deregulation that was widely 
criticized as lacking specifics. Many expens 
contend that bureaucracy's clout has actually 
increased under Mr. Hosokawa's regime be- 
cause of (he political fragility and inexperience 
of the coalition. 

Mr. Hosokawa and his allies have made no 
secret of their low esteem for the bureaucracy. 

"The politicians have fought this battle 
among themselves over political reform and 
compromised,” said Jesper Roll, chief econo- 
mist at S.G. Warburg Securities (Japan) Inc. 
and a former aide to a member of parliament. 
“Now the battle really begins — the battle 
between politicians and bureaucrats.” 


Nurmis Urging 
Moderation on 
China Trade Ban 


BEIJING: Decisions Could Lead to Greater Freedoms 


[nlematianai Herald Tribune 


WASHINGTON — Senator 
Sam Nunn, a leading foreign policy 
force in Congress, urged modera- 
tion Sunday in U.S. policy toward 
fTiitm, saying that nation's most- 
favored- nation trading status 
should not be ehmmated across the 
board if Beijing fails to improve 
human rights conditions. 


Coatinmdfnm Page I 

selves on a path to extinction. The collapse of Commu- 
nist rule, many Chinese leaders fear, could ignite 
social chaos, even civil war. 

"The fear of social duos is never Jar below the 
surface in their p lanning and thinking ," said a senior 
Western official who works closely with top leaders 
on economic and development issues. 

Between the extremes, a middle path £ot political 
reform in China seems possible, but it is seldom 
debated, since the Communist Party considers power- 
sharing another form of suicide. 

Many economists say the key to China’s uninter- 


rupted expansion lies in the United States, where 
China sold as much as $40 billion in goods in 1993, a 


Mr. Nunn, a Georgia Democrat 
who is chairman of the Senate 
Armed Services Committee, made 
the comment in a broadcast inter- 
view as he discussed security issues 
arising from North Korea's refusal 
to permit full inspection of its nu- 
clear facilities. 


"We need to keep the pressure 
on human rights,” Mr. Nnnn said, 
“but I think using (he total cutoff 
of MFN is too heavy a weapon, 
particularly when we have the other 
stakes in Northeast Asia, with 
North Korea." 


China sold as much as $40 billion in goods in 1993, a 
phenomenal leap from $2 .5 billion in sales just 10 
years earlier. 

Thus, when the history of China at the end of the 
20th century is written, it will have to be asked 
whether this group of colorless Communist cadres, the 
successors of Mao and Mr. Deng, nurtured or under- 
mined the largest economic expansion in China's 
history. 

To protect this huge export market in America. 
China must change, Mr. Clinton says, and there are 
several basic questions about that change. First among 
them is whether the Chinese leadership can make 
tough decisions, or whether it is too paralyzed by 
factional rivalries as it awaits the death of Mr. Deng, 
who is 89 and in declining health. 


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The conventional wisdom for some time has been 
that China's leaders are seized by an abundance of 
political caution. This analysis bolds that no leader 
wants to appear as having made concessions to ihe 
United States, especially on human rights or democra- 
cy issues, for fear of losing out in any power struggle 
with hard-line factions after Mr. Deng s death. 


Two previous Chinese leaders, Hu Yaobang in 1987 
and Zhao Ziyang in 1989, lost their jobs by showing 
sympathy for democratic reform. 

Butin the last several months, Chinese leaders seem 
to be paving the way for some major new decisions on 
human rights. 

For the first time in 45 years, they have entered 
detailed discussions with the International Committee 
of the Red Cross about opening Chinese prisons. Such 
a decision would allow Red Cross workers to visit any 
political prisoner and determine if he or she was being 
tortured or mistreated. 

In Paris recently. Foreign Munster Qian Qichen 
told Mr. Christopher that China would for tie first 
time give detailed information on the list of 235 
Chinese political prisoners compiled by Washington 
last fall. 

A Hong Kong human rights campaigner, John T. 
Kamm. said that China might have already quietly 
released 30 to 60 political prisoners whose names were 
among the 235. There are also some signs, Mr. Kamm 
says, that China is putting greater numbers of political 
prisoners on “medical parole," 



SIEGE: 

2d Cruel Wittier 


As do Muslims throughout Bos- 
nia, the mostly Muslim population 
here wonders if the town — or toe 
country — has any future at au. In 
a sign of cymdsni and despair, peo- 
ple haw renamed a main road 
Profiteer’s Street, in recogmnoo 
that black marketeers control mom 
of life. Another is called Palestinian 
Way, a reference to what many fear 
is their future: life in a ghetto sur- 


rounded by an occupying army. 
The Canadian troops say they 


CWi RuU/Afltoce Fnucoftrara 

A Mnsfim woman and an armed escort in the Mrafim cemetery in Sarajevo’s OM Towm on Satfay. 


BUILDING: China Bans Construction for a Year 



ENGLISH TEACHERS, bingud. topsrv 
erad. fuMme. Lego? or hnaxjal 
knowtedga preferred. TeL Cybefe 

LEGAL SERVICES 


Continued from Plage 1 
ods year, the bureau said. The big- 
gest construction increases were 
funded with capital raised by the 
builder hims elf or by foreign in- 
vestmenL throwing doubt on 
whether the State Council's order 
wiD actually cool the boom. 

Projects that are bank-financed 
are easier for the government to 
stop through its control of the 
banks, analysts said. Privately 6- 


If this excess rate of credit-easing 
continues, the economy will start 
overheating again, it warned. - 

Other unstable factors were last 
year’s large trade deficit, which is 
potting pressure on China’s bal- 
ance of payments, and the public’s 
fear of inflation, which led to panic 
buying in some places last year, it 
sard. 


□anced projects require only the 
approvals of local officials. 


approvals of local officials. 

The construction boom has out- 
paced increases in the output of 
steel cement and other building 
materials, forming a key element in 
pushing up the rate of inflation. 

Bureau figures show the rate for 
all 1993 at 14 5 percent nationwide 
and 19.6 percent in the major cities, 
where the year-oo-year rate in De- 
cember rose to 23.9 percent 

The construction boom is one of 
several unstable economic factors, 
the China News Service said in a 
somber forecast for the economy in 
1994. 

It said many places were waiting 
for Beijing to give them more au- 
thority in order to start many new 
projects. 

It said the authorities started 
loosening controls on credit in Sep- 
tember, so there was fast growth in 
cash and loans in the fourth quar- 
ter. 


The construction budget for the 
Ministry of Railways will reach 
S4.8 bilfion this year, almost double 
the $2.6 billion last year, (he press 
agency said 

Construction funding for the 
Ministry of Posts and Telecom- 
munications will increase more 
than 25 percent from S4.6 billion 
in 1993 to $62 billion this year. 

The State Council announce- 
ment came after a speech by Zhu 


nor, to “keep a close watch" on 
loans for feed-asset investment to 
insure they were not diverted to 
unauthorized projects. 

China's last boat of high-speed 
growth ended in 1988, when 18 
percent nationwide inflation 
prompted panic buying and batik 
runs. That m turn fanned the Tian- 
anmen Square protest in 1989 call- 
ing for greater democracy. 

"Strict control over the scale of 
fixed asset investment is related to 
whether reforms this year can pro- 
gress smoothly or not and whether 
the economy can continue healthy 
development or not," the oouncau 
said 


Rongji, deputy prune minister in 
chmge of the economy, is winch he 
criticized some of Goals for bong 
orazealous in starting new pro- 
jects. 

Potential risks arising bom for- 
reaching economic reforms being 
introduced this year lie “not in the 
reform itself, but in the overheated 
expansion of capital investment," 
Mr. Zhu told an ideological and 
press work conference last week. 

The State Council circular called 
on the central People’s Bask of 
China, of which Mr. Zhu is gover- 


The notice did not outline Emits 
onJoans to loss-making stamo om- 

credit this year, some^ag^that 
some Western economists recom- 
mend It was also unclear how the 
government in Beijing would en- 
force the notice. • 

In the urban consumer basketin 
December, the highest increases 
were for fresh vegetables, up 4£5 
percent from a year earlier, and for 
grain, up 42.4 percent. 

Worst hit were Haikou, capital 
of Hainan province, with -34 per- 
cent. and Nanchang, capital of 


find their job essentially impossi- 
ble. According to the Seamy 
C flpnril mandate that established 
the safe area, tbey are supposed to 
be protecting against Serbian in- 
cursions and disarming the local 
Muslim mili tia But, as is the other 
four designated safe areas in Bos- 
nia, there are far too few UN 
troops here to perform (hose tasks. 

The recently departed com- 
mander of UN forces in Bosnia. 
Lieutenant General Francis Bri- 
quemont of Belgium, sought at 
least 1,000 troops for Srebrenica, 
but had problems getting anyone at 
all to come. 

Wrangling within the United 
Nations blocked him from assign- 
ing a battalion of Nordic troops. 
When the original Canadian force 
was relieved in November, the re- 
placement company was at least 
100 soldiers smaller than the first 
one, which forced die group to 
dose 5 ctf 13 observation posts 
along the front line. 

“We haw to make do with what 
we have,” said Major Yvan Bou- 
chard, 32,. the Canadian, officer 
who commands the company. "But 
realty, it Isn’t much." 

Talk in Western capitals about 
air strikes to fence the Serbs to let 
the r'flnndians leave dismays the 
UN soldiers hoe because they 
flunk such a maneuver would mean 
death. It worries local leaders, too. 

*Tf they did it, the Serbs would, 
turn-all their guns onto the tity and 
fire," said n Srebrenica veterinari- 
an, Fahindin Sabhovic, who is the 
wartime mayor. 

A UN peacekeeper was more 
terse. “There would be a lot erf dead 
Canadians." be said. “And no one 
would be able to help us." 

The Security Cottabaprodaimed 
Srebrenica a safe area in April after 
a Serbian offensive almost razed 
the town. Serbian forces had al- 
ready devastated two outlying ar- 
eas in a brutal offensive that 
prompted the then-commander of 
UN forces in Bosnia, lieutenant 


Both are in the booming south. 

(AJFP, Bloomberg, Reuters) 


General Philippe Morillou of 
France, to travel haem a dramatic 
gesture to save the local people. 

But in May, when General Mor- 
fllon negotiated the terms of the 
safe area, he neglected to leave the 
town with a water supply. He cut 
its prewar area of 212 square miles 
(548 square kilometers) to 56 
square- miles. Refugees crowded 
into the territory, winch embraced 
the town and about 30 outlying 
settlements. Population swelled 
from about 30,000 to 44,000. 

Srebrenica's plight highlights the 
outride world’s role in the war. 
'General MoiiLlon, the Security 
Council and now the Canadians 
undoubtedly have saved thousands, 
from death or refugee status. But 
they have managed to offer only 
food and cramped shelter. Free- 
dom of travel, which is formally 
guaranteed under the safe-area 
mandate, is only a dream. 

Nor is there workl The five fac- 
tories have been blown to sonthcr- 
eens. Some young, men spend then- 
days feffing trees tram the balding 
tolls that used to surround the city 
m a ring of green. Most others, 
along vnth' women, mid children, 
spend their time playing ont a 
ghostly ritual on the streets. 

They pace — by the thousands . 


S mqor Nor* American rtl arpon. 
FT ftxg Q3-11 0 55 13 13. 

RIGHT PROMOTIONS M BUSINESS 
& fev ctes. T«t 133-11 40 27 86 87 
to OJ-II 40 27 Po 88 I 


RUSSIA: Organized Crime Has Nation by the Throat 


Continaed from Page 1 

information from bank accounts to select which com- 
panies to exploit and how much to demand in payoffs. 

The report to Mr. Yeltsin was based on "dozens, 
even hundreds" of interviews with entrepreneurs in 
major cities, said Pyotr S. Filippov, an economist and 
former parliamentary deputy who heads the Analyti- 
cal Center, which is part of the president's 
a dminis tration. 

“Over the last six months, the situation has become 
much worse because it has met with no resistance," 
said Mr. Filippov. He said Mr. Yeltsin's aides bad not 
responded to the report, which was sent to them on 
Jan. 17. 

In the last two years, the government has made 
several attempts to fight crime and corruption, which 
have contributed greatly to public discontent, Bui 
none have managed to curb the criminality and law- 
lessness that now pervade life and business in Russia. 

Moreover, overtaxation, heavy regulations and hap- 
hazard enforcement have all reinforced the criminal 
atmosphere, the report said. 

In the absence of a functioning court system, and 
confronted with the indifference and even hostility of 
a corrupt police force, even law-abiding entrepreneurs 
I find themselves sucked into the criminal world as they 


look to private security agencies for protection and as 
a means of collecting debts. •..- ••• 

"An entire generation is growing up for whom this 
situation is normal and who in such circumstances wffl 
not turn to official authorities, but to unofficial ones,” 
the report said. 

Mr. Filippov made a series of sweeping proposals, 
including an elite, high-salaried anti-crime unit an- 
swerable only to the president that would be granted 
special police powers. 

His most' emphatic recommendation was that -the 
unit not hire anyone who had worked in either (he old 
Interior Ministry or in the Security Ministry, both of 
which have been rendered ineffective by their complic- 
ity in illegal activities. 

The Interior Ministry says criminal organizations 
committed 355,500 crimes last year, a 27.8 percent rise 
from 1992. But thereportto Mr. Yeltsin uses the term 
“organized crime" loosely, including racketeers, shady 
business executives and comipt bureaucrats. - 

In general, it said, organized crime controls about 
40,000 businesses, 2,000 in the state sector. 


srvelv into new commercial operatkn 
employ their (rid methods of raaceteaii 
and murder to intimidate competitors. 


tions where 


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once payment is made yair aa wtH appear wimm 

48 ACCORD: Arafat Sees a Detailed Plan 'Very Soon ’ 


FRANCE HCfctok 


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MS3DLEEAST 


Contiamed from Page 1 

months of secret diplomacj’, Israel and the Palestine 
Liberation Organization have found their monumen- 
tal leap toward reconciliation has bogged down in a 
legalistic quagmire. 

In a memorable September ceremony at the White 
House, when Mr. Arafat and Prime Munster Yitzhak 
Rabin of Israel ended decades of bitter enmity with a 
handshake, the two sides signed a declaration of 
principles calling for Israeli military withdrawal from 
the autonomy zones and (he transfer of administrative 
control to Palestinian authorities. 

But the timetable slipped when Israel refused to 
start pulling Us military forces out of the occupied 
areas as planned on Dec. 13 because of disagreements 
over the control of border crossings, the territorial 
scope of Palestinian jurisdiction over Jericho and 
security for Israeli settlements. 


Israeli police would have io take place in the presence 
of a Palestinian lawyer. 

Israel has insisted tint the security of its settlements 

in the Gaza Strip and the West Bank must be assnred 
by penniitiag Israeli troops to guard the roads in and 
out of the settler compounds. Whether they would 
share jurisdiction with Palestinian police at sporadic 
checkpoints remains unclear. 

The negotiators have dashed over the size of the 
Jericho district, which Israel had wanted to restrict, to 


Jordan Diplomat 
Slain by Gunman 
In West Beirut 


Washington Patt Service 

AMMAN, Jordan —A Jordani- 
an diploma! was shotand IriBed in 



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TeL-351-I4S7-7293. 
to 351 -I -457-7352. 
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to 3509257. 
svmnsiAictftjfc. 

ML: 10211728 a) 21. 
to 10211 728 30 91. 
UMIB3 IQMGDOM: lerttao, 
ML C71 1 836 4802. 


tfHED ARAB MAPS: Shaioh, 
Tou 06)351 133. ^ 

toM 3748888 
Tcfef684£4 7SMKF. 


Authority over the entry and exit of people into the 
zones has posed the most difficult problem. The Pales- 
tinians insisted they must remain ultimate arbiters 
once sovereignty passed into their hands, but the 
IsraeEs said their responsibility for external security 
demanded a right to forbid the entry of suspected 
terrorists or other undesirables. 

The two sides have explored a range of compro- 
mises, focusing on joint patrols and shared authority 
at the frontiers. One proposal called for use of a one- 
way mirror so that Israeli guards could watch for 
undesirable travelers while allowing Palestinian 
guards to handle oil paperwork. Any interrogation by 


Palestinians demanded 80 square miles. Sources dose 
to the talks say the issue is dose (o-resafarioo.. 

Undo: the Washington agreements, a lull Israeli 
mflitaiy withdrawal is not required-io jbe completed, 
until April 13.-But both sides have become anxious 
about breaking the deadlock because of growing vio- 
lence and disenchantment in both camps.- • 

r-. -- • - - *« _-v •»___»» 


days after Jordan's ki 
renewed commitment 
with Israel. . • 


made a 
r peace 


ASUUPAOK 


HONGKONGe 

TtLBSaraZMlBR 

Tfe_- 01170 IH1HX. 
to IB52] 7222-1190. 

9NGAKME; 

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to (05)224 15 60 l 

■‘"^£§^'02 10. 
tc £0671 he 32 01 0209 


to rebuild ti» i nfrastru ct ur e in Gaza md Jir w-h o have 
been held up by uncertainty ova* the transirion to 
Palestinian sdf-rule. 

Both sides acknowledge they can.. only, convince, 
skeptical Palestinians about the value of the rew r 
plan if they produce tangible i mpro vcmcot m oving 
conditions. 

Mr. Arafat said the PLO develop me niplan calls for 
more than $73 bfifion over the next seven years » 
rehabilitate Bara and Jericho. He another Mar- 
shall Plan will be necessary to uproot the poverty and 
despair feeding “extremist and fanatic groups.” 


• Naeb Umran Maaitah, 42; first 
»3»tary at the embasy and. the 
first diplomat to be. killed in the 
LrfJanese.capxtaT anoe J986, died : 
fiom gunshot wounds m hit liwui 
' and neck afor an umdaie&d as- 
smlant fixed seven bullets . 

the windsfiiftld of his tar in anSt 
log lot Dearths tfiptonjstf s honiei 


Thedioot^ came on the hedi 
of a higfr^rofifcyiritby.KiniHus- 
sein to Washington, dminpr which 
he met senior UA t^dals and 
.American. Jewish hades. It also 
came astebanon sought td demon- 
str^ ftsonontic stably to a yid* 


uuv 

'Fond team. -• 


" , r 


Wasted the town center, wounding 

epidemic of 

but the lack of any real hospiun 
and of medical supptes means 
death cranes easfiy mj tints or 
illnesses that v.-ould be roubnely 
cured elsewhere. There is no starva- 
tion, bur with Serbs alwa« abreio 
choke off the UN convoys .that feal 
this town, the threat of hunger is 
always near. 

- There is almost literally no w»y 
oul A nine-brair hike over fog- 

" -j „ throuzh Serb-held n jfwmiaui s 
tods to another isolated enctave, 
the UN safe area of Zepa- 

People here said some made the 
trek to birv black-market goods 
from the Ukrainian UN soldiers 
there, who are more amenable to 
■rteaic than tbe stricter Canadians. 
Another possibility is a seven-day 
trek noth » Tuzla, the biggest 
MusHm-hdd area in Bosnia. 

But many of those who try the 






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Bosnian Serb Warns on Tuzla 

Aid Planes Worth 'Take Off Agoing Be Says 

Canadian UN troop 


SARAJEVO, Bosma-Herzegovina — A Bosn ian the Mushnu safe area Q0 QWectkm to 

Serbian army commander warned the West on Sunday Bosnian Serbs said that 

noitouseforoetot^theMns&n-OOTir^ Dutch utaps? replay 

At Tu2la, sayifig any plane that landed would “never 1 was anoth^nMrfto r -r:~ " 


Botros Butros GfaaB , 
to his special repre- 

• ’■J* ...VI AlraiWI 


not to ase fo«* ttqpen tlreMnsfim^^ airport Diitditrbcp^Tepiw^ 

nf T irglu-; gnyrrt g any plane that landed wcrnld “never ' was anOthfiTIMltor^r'' 

hfikr vaaovi c sad Ins enemies said Friday 

wanted the mrpajtin the central town to hdp them for dose air 

cany out jhdr raihlaiy objectives. : i j- .• &e -authority ^ Protection 

' “Because of that, not one plane must landaiTu^- support £ ^J^’2f“^£ en i C a- 

airport,”GeneralNGkwaiaOTictddTaDjagpiessagcn- - Force m niherTi^ raaE ^ insisted on 

cy. adding that his uratshad thespot “witfim thdi gun approve first use of air power 

**i United Nations and the North AdantioTitaty ■ -pSEHjjr wompted Britain to 

nviiiinnlimilirMcn^tniiiieiiirjirikBtOOiySl Alliluiy ^ ift R T OlHr of its drivers 


■ .flax & tadTS 

through central Bosnia, wnere oaraes Deiwcxa uosm- c^voy- teams m Bosnia 
ah Croats and Mrisfim4ed forces contmuaDy hinder 

convoys. . ... -- ~^n!^Yawiih the abdnctiou of three British aia 

U.S. toMonitor SerbsFrom Albania 

New York Tima Service ' ' ■ ■ ' 

WASHINGTON — The cold war redly is over 
The Central Imeffigeoce Agency will use Albania, 
once the most isolated and xenophobic Iron Curtam 
country, as a base for a newU.S. spy plane to monitor 

the war in the foxrner Yugoslavia, according to defense 

officials. 



Page 5 


Amid the Haggling, 
Hong Kong Airport 
Is ' Rising From Sea ’ 

... .1 TV 


Tfe' Gnat was 

conflicts. The system to 


monitor regional 
in Albania — two 



Gnats and asateune msn cobuuk “““ “T"” 

— is Far cheaper and less sophisticated than pboto- 
reoramaissaiice satellites, which each cost more than 
Slb3Hon. 


fnaais. - 

the CIA approached Albania for pdrinssiai'to use 
its territory after Italy, a North Atlantic Treaty Oxga- 
nwaiin n partner, of the United States, refused to allow 
the agency to operate from It alian airfields. 

_ l_n~j .1 A,a« W« nnor. nf 



Bosma-HazegDvina, 

ATkania'c Aitrxnti 


'.a 


je agency U> operate ouui ii w ii wh 

The plane, called the Gnat, has a range of 

only 50G mDes;. about 800 kilometers, so it- most, be 
based near its intended targets. Plans for its deptajj^ 
pvnt and the mission in Albania arc reported m- the 
rmwtrng issueof Aviation W eek- sand Space Tccpnofr- 
ogy, an ferospacerindnstty magazine. 


|in niiii j mDbiAuawM 

defense official said. 

The plane is about 16 feet long (neatly five mews 
Iona) witha wingspan of about 35 feet It can hnger 
^SJ^SSSSat up to 24 hours. It cantos onrts 
back a dome with infrared and da^opncal sctsots 
A f Thennaaes are beamed 


u fan pic- hfena fnnsx-PmM 

CHANGING Marcbais, the 

Rights Abuses in Mexico Raise 

’ 1,0 and NAFTA 


to create mgnai images ui »«*• 

-back to a -salrihte (fish, which can relay them to 
Washington. 


By John M. Goshko 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON —The peasant 
up rising in southern Mexico on 
New Year’s Eve has raised ques- 

■ ■ ■ ■ . ■ — — t r ... tirms about whclhe ^^^^5 l ^J 

Ex-General Named Algerian leader Kim to ignore his commitment to 


The Associated Press - - 

ALGIERS — Tightening mffi- 
tary control diver the coontiy, Alge- 
ria's defense minister was named 
president on Sunday by an army- - 

backed committee. 

The High Security Council 
named T amine Zeroual to.a three- 
year transition term as president 
succeeding a five-man nnfitaiy- 
frnrWd committee that canceled 
elections when it took power wto 
■years ago. . , 

. The new leader, 53, is. a retired 

yaflrs i. Neither he nor the High 
State Committee he nepiacot on- 


Monday has widespread , public 


■ 

general Zeroual’s three-year, 
lenn is considered necessary to 

oveiuoaie the Mnriim insurgOJ^ 
that has taikea some 3,000 hves.m 
the last two years, and to b^n 
y^vmg the economic crisis. 

The" High Slate Committee or- 
dered the High State Council to 
a president aftor the coi- 

la^ diis Week of a national cen- 

. ference convened to m^) out the 
country's pofitics. .. , 

The conference, at windi the 

.... .j. to jga^h a 


Winners 



"1. — ■r -rwxf-f 

nrisdrtvSibawo omrferedthHB- 

jdves nnfiionaires m Saturday, tat 

thm hick quicks 
{q amhi lkd die weekly 

draw. - 


that balls 41 and 42 stuck in the 

tedLotto officialsiHiled 

to ,TDotine.d»^ 1 

.viewers caDed m toforce canceua- 
tinnot the draw. • 

• ‘A jpeond draw was.' held later 
Samrday, and the Lotto arganiza- 
tkm-Hpc^ized far the mcoove- 
nience. Rv* winners were an- 
nounced after the secood draw, 
f yf t winning 9.6 ’ million . francs 
<5267.000)., . . 


working agreement with the frac- 
tious political parties, fell apart 
when the mam political groups 
miked out or did not show up. 

' Fanner Foreign Minister Abdd- 
aziz BoutefUka had been expected 
to fxaime the post, tat he refused 
thejob when parties dropped wit of 
the conference, saying he did not 
want to be the leader of several 
parties in discord. 

■ General Zeroual replaces Ah 
Kafi, president of the ffigh State 
Committee, whkh has battled the 
Muslim insurgency for, 1 *® y^ 15 * 
Mr. Kaffs mandate ends Monday. 

The High State Committee look 
power in January 1992 after the 
Sncdlation of twrwla^e legislative 
elections that were bang won by 
Islamic fundamentalists. 


human rights. 

Allega tion* that the Mexican 
Army committed widespread rights 
violations in suppressing the revolt 

in the southeastern stale of Chiapas 

have put the administration under 
to demonstrate that Mr. 


y nm im — r 

ised that countries seeking greater 
trade with the United States must 
have a good human rights record. 

Representative Robert G. Torri- 
celli, Democrat 


framaMEndTOtr Games 

The Associated Press 

NICOSIA, Cyprus (AP)- 
Iran’s air, ground and naval forces 
have ended ax days of maneuvers 

in thePeraanGulf, thelatcstm a 

series of war games that mchided 
middle deployment 


of New jersey, the 

TO 11 ) w iiwir „ 

chairman of the Foreign Affaire 
subcommittee on Western Ham- 
sphere Affaire, has scheduled a 
faring Wednesday to look into 
allegations of rights abuses and 
“examine the potential for opns^ 
mgs mother parts of the country. 

There is no sign that the Chiapas 
unrest poses any serious threat to, 
NAFTA But it could lead some 
administration critics to call for a 
new look at whether Mexwoseco- 

nomicstabiBiy and commitment to 

democratic reform are strong 
enough to justify that toeUiuted 
States continue to move toward toe 
economic integration of the two 
countries. . 

U.S. officials reply that wfet is 
important now is for the Mexican 


to learn the lessons of 
. and take steps to ensure 
that it does not happen elsewhere 
within Mexico’s many pockets of 
poverty. 

The Chiapas insurrection in- 
volved lhe Zapatista National Lib- 
eration Army, a group consisting 
almost entirdy of Mayan Indians, 
which seized several towns and vil- 
lages and declared its inientionio 
overthrow the government of Presi- 
dent Carlos Salinas de Gortan. 

Mr. Salinas's efforts to create a 
free market economy in Mexico 
triggered great hostility in Chiapas, 
where the large Indian community 
and thousands of refugees from 
neighboring Guatemala long tave 
fera exploited by large landholders 
and ignored by the governmaiL 
The government s pro-NAFTA 
policies added to thdr anger by 
cutting off subsidies to traditional 

* . _ r s'svmmiiniflPS- de- 


Mayan fanning communities, de- 
pressingprices for local cash crops 
like coffo 


like conee. corn and sugar and 
making h easier for weU-connected 
lanSoras to evict Indian squatters 
from unused land. 

“There’s no doubt that events in 
Chiapas derive from poverty and 


lack of abilitv of the Mexican sys- 
tem — ibe government and every- 
else — to deal with some of 
the fundamental problems in that 
part of the world." said Alexander 
F. Watson, assistant secretary of 
srate for imer-American affairs. 

Mr. Watson and other U.S. offi- 
cials argued that the Chiapas un- 
rest should be seen as a warning of 
how important it was to complete 
Mexico's transformation to a free- 
market economy. The officials said 
that if NAFTA fulfilled its promise 
of creating jobs and higher wages, 
it would help Mexico toward great- 
er democracy and respect for hu- 
man rights. 

The officials denied that the ad- 
ministration's high priority on gel- 
ling NAFTA approved causal it to 
soft-pedal concerns about himian 
rights. They noted that the State 
Department's human rights coun- 
iryreports for 1992 had document- 
ed the Mexican government s fre- 
quently heavy-handed tactics to 
suppress dissent and opposition to 
the Salinas government. They add- 
ed that the 1993 report, scheduled 
for release in the next few days, 
would do the same. 


Reuters 

HONG KONG - While Giina 
and Britain battle over Hong 
Kong’s giant new airport, local of- 
ficials are keen to get one message 
across - that it is being built. thaL 
it is largdv on schedule and that it 
is definitdY under budget. 

under way in Hong Kong- 
“Everybody can see that the air- 
port is rising from the sea, said 
Chief Secretary Anson Chan. 

An artificial island for the air- 
port is almost 40 percent built; 
work starts soon on the terminal 
budding; and lhe twin towers of 
one of the world’s biggest suspen- 
sion bridges, which will P rovld ‘\® 
road and rail Bnk with «nttd 
Hong Kong, have climbed to 200 
meters (nearly 600 feet). 

The Cbek Lap Kok project is 
colossal. It is one-third bigger than 
the British-French Channel Tun- 
nel which makes the aiiport the 
largest single public works cposi" 
tion under way in the world. It 
comprises 10 infrastructure pro- 
jects. with the airport itself costing 
70 billion Hong Kong doDara (S9 
billion), less than half the total cost 
The project has also become a 
political football between Hong 
Kong and China. Beijing has rqot- 
ed afl financing plans, saying they 
would leave a huge debt to be re- 
paid after the British colony re- 
turns to China in 1997. 

Things went from bad to worse 
when Governor Chns Patten s 
plans for democratic change pro- 
voked a major dispute in 1992. 
Now Mr. Patten is no longer sure of 
meeting the target date for the first 
flight into Chek Lap Kok of June 
30 1997, the day Britain leaves. 

•‘We want to’do as much as we 
possibly can by the end of June '97 
in an orderly and sensible way, 
Mr. Patten said recently. “Exactly 


IVik . a m . j 

how much we can do win depend 
on when we get agreement with the 
Chinese side." 


mil GAG SlUlr. 

Without an agreement, there is 
no Chinese guarantee to repay air- 
port debt after 1997. As a result, 
Hong Kong is moving ahead on the 
project stop by stop, financing each 
contract itself. , 

Officials are still hopeful the first 

aircraft can land before the end of 

1997. But it is now too late to have 
a rail link operating fully by the 
time the airport opens. 

the government picked a 
remote site among Hong Kong’s 
rugged outlying island^ the airport 
needs a 34-kilometor (21-mile) rail 


and road link to central Hong 

^Tfe iRik, which straddles three 
islands plus Hong Kong harbor, 
includes two major bridges, roan 
and rail tunnels and several large 
land reclamations. Of these, only 
the cross-harbor road tunnel has 
been privately financed. 

Apart from the railroad, mat of 
(he project is on or ahead of sched- 
ule. And the government s point of 
cride is that it is running under toe 
budget produced in 1992. The Eu- 
ropean Channel Tunnel s cost by 
comparison has spiraled 66 per- 
cent. 

Earlier this month, the govern- 
ment cut the forecast cost by 5.5 
billion Hong Kong dollars, sawig 
rha t contracts had been awarded m 
lower than expected tenders. A 
fixed price svsiera means that con- 
tractors rather than the govern- 
ment carry the risk for inflation 
and cost overruns. 

Bui not everything is rosy, lne 
government estimates that every 
Sx months’ delay due to the *s- 
pote with China will add 4 bflhon 
Hong Kong dollars to the cost 
Nowhere is the scale of theun- 
dertaking clearer than at the Chet 
Lap Kok ate itself. 

The site resembles a moonscape, 
teeming with huge dumper trucks. 

“It's totally destroyed, its an 
open mine," the site rwlamaxron 
director, Frans Uiteiwtjk, told re- 
porters on a recent visit- 
In fact, a hillock from the old 
Chek Lap Kok and a stretch of 
coastline have been left as a gesture 
to environmentalists. 

Elsewhere, the island is a desert. 
Contractors are blasting away 
Chek Lap Kok's hills and dumping 
the rock into the sea to create an 
island 5 kilometers by 35 kilome- 
ters. , 

More than a thousand workers 
live on the island or aboard dredg- 
ers. One group of 300 Filipinos quit 
their troubled copper mine in the 
Philippines and moved en masse to 
work at Chek Lap Kok. . _ 

The airport terminal site is fin- 
ished — the basement is being ex- 
cavated. Contractors are now con- 
centrating on finishing ti» site of 
the first run wav. A second runway 

is to be built soon after the airport 

° P Mr Uiterwijk admits to some 
problems. One member of the six- 
member joint venture contractor 
has fallen behind on Building, a sea 
wafl. But the terms of the 9 billion 
Hong Kong dollar contract encour- 

pay penalties if one falls behind- 



FDR * STALIN: . 

A Not So Grand Affiance, 
1945-1945 y ' 

By Amos Perhnutter. 331 pa#** 
$29.95. University of Missoun 
Press. 

Review«Tby v 

Kenneth Adelman 

Roosevelt inept in the face of Sta 
tin’s detennmati^^^L^^ 
am president to 

Son Europe? Had Raosw® 

been a tou^arsOTto^wjWvto 

have been <Stwe 



it is easy 


and strident 

KSKJSg 

compoop in Ddaro 

Devotees of __,r gjsfty 

Roosevdi, 








TOR >£SSi 

sisagSSsfs 

thoseof jyjJlSJof an incurable 
Hanfly^^V before be 

«pp«a»- « kw 

must be fit®-" v,.-* PcriniBtter, 

^S-asshs® 

s&SffiSSsa 


Uaf b what had happened m WoM 

War L Ami that's .what was agreed 
■apab. — not only .by Pedraptto's 
fiSetat aJrobyfeW°,Wm«m 
ChHdnfi. Monas before the Unrt- 
cd States entered the war, d»e two 
agreed , to avoid secret diplomacy 
and to defer territorial roattas ann 
«*pdiik^baiganis^ nntil-the peace 
conference. 

This was not tobe. As Peflmutta 

hinadf diows m a nice pa ece ct 

^dL he stin persists in his n^coo- 
ceptkms. Here, F DR wasj iowhere 
^Seqpato; not Chnn^^s mag- 
nificent, as perimutispratayx. 

■ It was Giurchiffs cabin^ as 

Pcrimotter wmtxs to ^ 

May 1942 “friendship treaty”™ 

tfe Soriet Unita a^^soed to an 

that -Stdin gained fiom ms naa- 
Soriet Pact On /that, FDR. dc- 
ApdCl^ifflhijgdf dr 
fmd Stain, in October 1944, the 
“percentage formula.’’ to diwde up 
objected to 

nr^tical politics- He had .shown 
gorios jo P< riitical _^g l ^j£ 

ance witiu&atmn, brfore theUmt- 
ed Stales -was event m the war. 

- True, FDR proved too ftodbto, 
fl^not in&erem; concerning 


Eastent Europe's fate. Pedmutwr 

ai the time. The rcahty of war 
forced the preddenl to focus on 

more parochial interests. Keepmg 


m mmed forces than to Britain’s. 

Perimnttoi's woric is anovff- 
g^tement of an argumait that has 
much merit Despite his 

cesses, his thesis retains dial nrait, 

and his well-crafted bock has bite. 

It is true that FDR never did 

. chare Qnndiiirs hraror at Stalins 
past baibarism or fear of Stalins 
future conquests. He was mhumm- 
ly unmo ved by Soviet atrocities (he 
was scarcely moved even by tiiow 
of his enemy, the Naas). He mea 


to quash an aide's finding that Sta- , 
tin’s secret police were responsible 
for the 1940 Katyn forert mass^ 
of perhaps as many as 15,000 pol- 
ish officers. FDR sought to em- 
brace “Unde Joe" to ftash the war 
in Europe and then Asia . and to 
begin a vibrant United Nations. 
Nota bad ambition, tat not all that 

pr ^^p^Stea- is quite right thm 
Stalin bad dear strategic goals, 
^*ida he rdaitiessly purged. WMe 

Camrdiill shuddered at than, FDK 
mostly dnugasd them o». Thc« 
goals wee Sieved, thanks much 

mere to the Red Army’s power than 

FDR’s fecklessness. 

Kenneth Adelman, forma’ direc- 
tor of the U. S. Arms Control and 
Disarmament Agency, wrote this for 
Vie Washington Post. 


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Page 6 


MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 1994 


OPINION 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



niBUSHEIl WITH THE MEW VOKK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


SribunC Listening to Clinton: What About the Real World? 

i rue m&cur^rmM OrtcT 


The Yen Is What Matters 


Is principle, the Japanese are correct in 
their current trade quarrel with the United 
States. Negotiated targets for exports are a 
bad idea. The Americans bitterly reply that 
nothing else seems to work. The Japanese 
trade surplus has become intolerably large, 
and Japan has a clear responsibility to puli it 
down. Statements of good intentions have 
proved useless. The Clinton administration 
argues that only explicit targets — so many 
millions of dollars’ worth of certain specified 
products — seem to have any effect. 

Bui a lot of things are wrong with targets. 
They amount to a system of managed trade in 
which sales volumes are set by political deci- 
sions. While Americans complain (justly) about 
the influence of cartels in the Japanese market, 
import targets only strengthen them. The tar- 
gets require the Japanese government to sit 
down with industry groups to work out the 
market-sharing arrangements that they require. 

Worse, while target agreements can raise the 
sales of products they cover, they will not affect 
Japan’s total trade surplus. That is set by the 
way Japan runs its whole economy, and the 
amount of money it sends abroad to be invest- 
ed in the rest of the world. Similarly, America's 
total trade deficit is determined by the amount 


of foreign money that it draws in from abroad 
to be invested in America. That is why the trade 
deficit soared in the 1980s, a tune of declining 
private saving and big public deficits. The 
Gin ton administration's success in reducing 
the federal budget deficit is a far greater contri- 
bution to balancing American trade than any 
possible negotiated export targets. 

The United States is currently maintaining 
its standard of living by borrowing roughly 
5100 billion a year from the rest of the world. 
That is down from the mid-1980s, but a rich 
country like America ought not to be borrow- 
ing at all. If and when it stops borrowing 
abroad, its trade deficit will vanish. How? 
Among other things, rite Japanese yen's ex- 
change rate will rise. 

If and when that happens, Japan will not be 
entitled to much sympathy. No country in 
history has ever benefited as much from open 
markets elsewhere, yet its own door has never 
been more than a third of the way open. The 
exchange rate is the right remedy — which will 
be worth keeping in mind during the next 
couple of weeks as the exchanges of threats and 
denunciations between the American and Japa- 
nese trade negotiators get louder and angrier. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Now Wait and Be Ready 


Economic reform in Russia is on the ropes, 
and the Clinton administration is groping for 
a response. Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen 
and Ambassador at Large Strobe Talbott say 
the West must bold up aid until Russia puts 
mar ket reforms in place. A spokesman for the 
secretary of state denies that this is U.S. 
policy. Which is it? 

The United States cannot undo Russia’s 
recent elections, which produced a parliament 
split down the middle over reform and drove 
Presidem Boris Yeltsin to appoint an anti- 
reform government But Washington can pre- 
pare for the possibility that Russia may again 
reverse course and resume the difficult path 
toward markets. To do that BiD Clinton 
needs to learn from bis mistakes. 

The elections showed that reform cannot 
proceed without popular support; and West- 
ern aid could prove critical to that support by 
helping to cushion the worst effects of reform. 
The West never delivered most of the aid it 
promised — deciding it was more important to 
make sure that the money wasn't wasted than 
to back reformers who wanted to take Russia 
down the road toward democracy and markets. 
So it held up the money, waiting until reforms 
were ladled into place — and virtually assuring 
that they would never be tried. 

This sad story suggests that for Western aid 
to sway the political debate in Russia, it must 
be delivered up front, allowing reformers to 


fy UJS. policy. Mr. Talbott, the president’s 
Russia expert, told senators: “Our support will 


Russia expert, told senators: “Our support will 
follow their reform; it cannot be die other way 
around." If the administration sticks to that 
line, it will undermine Russian reformers when 
the current gpvernmait's financial mismanage- 
ment gives them a chance to rearm to power. 

Senators accused the administration of being 
blind to the suffering of Russian workers. The 
truth is that few leaders at either end erf Penn- 
sylvania Avenue were prepared to face Ameri- 
can taxpayers — millions of whom were unem- 
ployed and had exhausted gov e r nm ent benefits 
— and say that a few billion dollars was needed 
to set up a relief fund for Russian workers. 

Russia's new course is not the first wrong 
turn in its tortuous path to transformation, 
nor wiQ it be the last. The hope is that Russia’s 
leaders will reverse course before hyperinfla- 
tion destroys what is left of the economy, and 
that America’s leaders will be ready to help. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


The unexpected military revival of Bosnia's 
Muslim-led government has now produced a 
sharp open argument between France, speak- 
ing for most of Europe, and the United States. 
With negotiations flagging as Muslim forces 
press the war, the French urge Washington to 
get aboard the European diplomatic cam- 
paign to sell partition to Bosnia's warring 
factions. The Americans hold off, meaning to 
respect the decision of Muslims to use their 
new military edge to reclaim at least some of 
their lost lands. The French see a ’’moral’' 
aspect in trying to bring (he war to an early 
end. The Americans see “moral" purpose in 
allowing the “victim" party to fight on. 

There are inconsistencies and loose ends 
in the American stand. No mechanism ex- 
ists, for instance, to ensure that negotiations 
replace war at a point when the Muslims, 
assuming their success, feel territorially 
more content Nor is there any guarantee 
that the Muslims' recent battlefield success- 
es will not simply provoke Serbs and Croats 
to throw still larger forces into the fray. 
There can be no doubt that by the measure of 
lives lost and saved, the best course is to stop 
the war as quickly as possible. 

By the measure of the wishes of the most 


injured party, however, another course asks 
for priority. The Muslims are that party. 
They are not innocents ; they are themselves 
responsible for grave offenses. But, by a 
reasonable standard of fairness and justice, 
they are owed deference for their suffering 
and their victimization. While they were be- 
ing promiscuously slaughtered and uproot- 
ed, few came to their aid. An international 
arms embargo fell impartially on them and 
on their well-armed persecutors. Now, when 
they have finally provided better for their 
own defense, those who earlier left them in 
travail cannot easily tell them they should 
not fight for their own villages and homes. 

There is no evident official inclination or 
public support in the United States for 
ground deployments of American forces to 
aid the Muslim side or, for that matter, for 
any form of action by Washington alone. So 
many conditions have been attached to the 
idea of supportive air strikes as to render this 
possibility quite unlikely, too. But to offer 
political understanding for military risks 
that Muslims decide to take on their own in 
order to reverse the effects of “ethnic cleans- 
ing" — that is another matter. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Comment 


A Shadowy life for NATO 


Sometimes it is more difficult to buiy an 
organization that has served its purpose than 
it is to lei ii live a shadowy life. Take the 
North Adamic Treaty Organization. 

In the long term, the process of West Euro- 
pean Union is irreversible. But a key question 
'hat remains unanswered is how Jong this 
process will take. The speed with which West 
European economies move out of recession is 
one factor, but the vision of a federal Western 
Europe is not shared by all members. To an 
extent, the debate will 'be submerged by the 
momentum toward evolving common posi- 
tions. once Ibe economic gloom and its damag- 
ing concomitant, unemployment, have lifted. 

No one can doubt that Russia, today a 
supplicant in the corridors of Western power, 
will reassert her great power ambitions sooner 
or later. Presidem Yeltsin needs Washington's 


support and benevolence to surmount his pre- 
sent travails, and the question boils down to 
how long and bow many convulsions it will 
take for [Russia] to settle down. The signals 
that Washington, and the West, have seat so 
far are that they prefer stability to an accept- 
able democratic framework in Russia, and 
that Moscow has a legitimate interest in secur- 
ing its strategic interests in the former Soviet 
Union, particularly in the south. 

President Clinton’s good fortune is that 
Western Europe’s recession and dependence 
syndrome, combined with the depth of the 
Russian crisis, give him time to make some 
mistakes. For ibe present and (he immediate 
future, die United Slates remains the leader in 
determining the shape of Europe and the role 
which NATO, now bereft of its original goal 
should be made to play in it. 

— S. Nihol Singh, commenting 
in the Khokej Times (Dubai). 



International Herald Tribune 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 
Cii-Cfciiinnrn 


RICHARD McCLEAN, PubU r .h*r & Chief Executor 
JOHN VINOCUR. EitaOir & litrftiaJoi 

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B OSTON — President Bill Clinton was 
impressive when he talked about dames- 


D impressive when he talked about domes- 
tic issues in his State of the Union address 
because he connected. When he told of Amer- 
icans who were sick or needed family leave, he 
related to their pain. More than that, he 
seemed to be drawing from his own life, his 
own hopes and hurts. 

How different it was when he tuned to 
foreign affairs. One felt that his heart was not 
in it, that he was going through a mechanical 


By Anthony Lewis 


strangely — scarily — disconnected from 
reality. He said the advance of democracy 


The world is a frightening 
place. The only way for the 
United States to deal with it 
is to slide to principles. 


recitation of claimed achievements. It was as 
if he dealt with those things because he had to 
as president, not because they engaged his 
deepest moral or political concerns. 

The points he made showed his lack of 
focus on foreign policy. To call his com- 
ments shallow would be a compliment. 

In their blithe optimism they seemed 


reality. He said the advance of democracy 
elsewhere was tbe best way to ensure U.S. 
security, and that was why America had 
supported the democratic reformers in Rus- 
sia; be applauded Congress for backing bis 
initiatives to help Russia. But the reformers 
are out of power in Moscow. 

When President Clinton was there just 
two weeks ago, President Boris Yeltsin said 
that he would be “resolute and radical" on 
economic reform. Since then he has been 
weak and reactionary, giving up reform to 
please the Communists and extreme nation- 
alists in tbe State Duma. 

Tbe prospects for Russia look grim. Its 
new government has promised to pour mon- 
ey into the hopeless old slate industries — 
money that can come only from the printing 
press. That means that the economy will be 
at risk of hyperinflation, the condition when 
a currency becomes worthless. 

Weimar Germany is the classic example of 
what hyperinflation can do to a society. In 
such a situation demagogues wait in the wings 
to preach that dictatorship and nationalism 


are the answer. Russia has its demagogic 
today in Vladimir Zhirinovslty, the fascist 
who did so wdl in Decembers elections. 

Mr. Clinton and his foreign, policy team 
have made Russia their dominant in teres l- 
Aad i hey have made support for Mr. Yeltsin 
tbe baric, almost unquestioning prearise of 
their policy. Thus the a dn a ni s tra non did not 
object when Mr. Yeltsin asserted a special 
R ussian right of influence in the near 
abroad," the other former Soviet republics. 

It rgected urgent appeals from Poland 
and other East European countries for mem- 
bership in NATO because that might be 
politically difficult for Mr. Ydisin, offering 
them instead tbe essentially meaningless 
“Partnership for Peace." 

The Russo-centric — or Yeltsin-centric — 
policy looks like a disaster today. R u ssia is a 
potential source of great danger a huge 
country, with thousands of nuclear weapons, 
heading for economic chaos and for who 
knows what social disorder. Yet Mr. CUnttra 
talks as if all were welL 

In his State of the Union speech Mx. 


democracy, to free markeLS and to respect 

for existing borders. 


an luiwi j — ; — ir 

have destroyed Bosnia, a member 
the United Nations? 


the United Nations? . „ _ . 

What world is Mr. Clinton in? Does be 


Wild l woiiu « r- . 

know that European unity is Era ymg, ttat 
Europe and the United Slates have no credi- 
bility as guarantors of security after me 
West’s failure to stop Serbian aggression/ 

That leads to another point. 

Mr. Clinton spoke compdlingJy stoat a 

rick tittle giri whose father spdie to him m the 
White House. But hesaid nothing m the State 

of the Union, and he has said nothing else- 
where, about tbe six little children, who were 
(rttipd while a play in Sarajevo recently by 

deliberate Serbian shdiina of civilian areas. 

The world is a frightening place. The only 
way for the United Stales to deal with it is to 
stick to principles: to put down aggression on 

iheccHitWitwhereAmcrir^havekmgcom- 
rmtted tbemsdves to maintain peace ana ordm, 
Europe; and to approach a turbulent Russia 
not widi weakness bat with a darity and firm- 
ness that Russians will respect Above all. 
America has to open its eyes to reality. 

The New York Tones. 


Clinton also said that Europe now had the 
“possibility of becoming unified for the first 
timft in its entire history, based on the simple 
commitments of all nations in Europe to 


Asians, Suddenly in the Spotlight, Will Now Have to Do Better 


K uala lumpur — For the 

fust time in modern history, Eu- 


set up relief funds for dislocated workers, an 
inevitable fallout from true reform. 

No country in this century has undertaken 
radical market reforms without sizable for- 
eign aid; Russia is not likely to be the first. If 
the West gets another opportunity to promote 
reform, it must be ready to deliver substantia] 
aid without delay once a credible government 
promises a feasible reform strategy. 

Last week’s Senate bearing did tittle to dari- 


rope and North America are locking 
at Aria with a sense of wonder. Al- 


By Anwar Ibrahim 

77ie writer is deputy prime minister and finance minister of Malaysia. 


at Aria with a sense of wonder. Al- 
though there are encouraging signs of 
recovery in the United States, it is to 
Aria that everyone is turning to re- 
launch the world economy after its 
longest postwar slump. 

An Asian renaissance is very 
much in progress. Economic growth 
is the most visible aspect, but the 
revival also has cultural and intellec- 
tual dimensions. While an Asian re- 
surgence should be welcomed, it is 
important to ensure that it remains 
benign in all its effects. 

Contemporary Asians owe a pro- 
found debt to early Asian national- 
ist movements, but we have reason 
to be critical of some developments 
that occurred in the postcolonial 
era. Strident anti-Western rhetoric 
led to tensions and conflicts, libera- 
tion slogans became hollow because 
the masses were made to suffer un- 
der the incompetence and corrup- 
tion of ruling regimes. The economic 
stagnation of most Asian countries, 
and decay in a few, were an indict- 
ment of misguided policies. 

Asia in the 21st century should 
become a greater contributor to the 
advancement of human civilization. 
This will be impossible unless we 
fully restore our sense of confidence 
in ourselves and in the positive as- 
pects of our past and traditions. But 
confidence can easily become arro- 
gance. As we regain confidence, we 
must imbue ourselves with the virtue 
of humility. 

The economic performance of 
Asian countries in (he last two or 
three decades has been uneven. Thus* 
it is not just a question of sustaining 
momentum in nations that have 
achieved high growth, especially in 
East Asia. Growth must also be 
spread to other areas. 

The most significant conclusion of 
the recent World Bank study of Hong 
Kong, South Korea, Singapore, Tai- 
wan, China, Indonesia, Malaysia and 
Thailand — the eight high-perform- 
ing economies in East Asia — is that 
there is nothing miraculous about East 
Asian economic miracles. If other 
parts of Aria can achieve political sta- 
bility, invest more in education than in 
defense, release initiative and entre- 
preneurship rather than stifle them, 
and undertake pro-growth and mar- 
ket-friendly policies. those economic 
miracles in tune will also be theirs. 


The economic challenges faring 

the high-performing eight are by no 
menus One concern must be 
whether the current economic diffi- 
culties in Japan and the slowing of 
growth in South Korea presage an 
inevitable future course for the others. 

My own view is that Japan, South 
Korea and other East Asian nations 
are far from reaching their full bloom 
and will not undergo the long-term 
relative decline ascribed to ibe ma- 
ture industrial economies of the 
West Only inept policies and exces- 
sive greed can prevent Aria from real- 
izing its fullest potential 

Nonetheless, the pain that Japan is 
enduring should beajwdent remind- 
er to other countries in the region to 
exerdse restraint or even impose dis- 
cipline on sectors that are highly sus- 
ceptible to excessive speculation, sec- 
tors where greed can create a fragile 
bubble economy. Such bubbles even- 
tually burst throwing the entire 
economy off balance, erasing all tbe 


achievements of macroeconomic sta- 
bilization and derailing growth. 

Impressive though East Asia's eco- 
nomic performance may be, much of 
the wealth it generates by exporting 
manufactures is built on the intellec- 
tual property of the West. We have a 
very, very long way to go before we 
become producers of industrial goods 
in our own right. 

An industrial nation, must have 
much more than factories. At tbe 
heart of an industrialized society is 
brainpower — the pool erf scientists, 
technologists, designers, inventors 
who t ranslate h uman creativity and 
scientific ideas into tangible goods. 
Tbe factories and machines are m fact 
only tbe last stages of the total devel- 
opment work that needs to be dona 
Real iiidustriaiizaaan requires a scien- 
tific culture that has become indigoi- 
ized by permeating the fabric of soci- 
ety and becoming inseparable from it 

Asian countries, with a few notable 
exceptions, have yet to attain the lev- 


el of development where the manu- 
facturing sector is driven by an indig- 
enous scientific and t earned ogkal 
culture. We are still largely depen- 
dent on the intellectual resources of 
the West. To remedy tins situation, 
we need massive investments in edu- 
cation, scientifi c research and human 
resource development. We can do 
this as individual countries or, more 


among ourselves. 

No dvQizaticn deserving the name 
can be based entirely on industrial 
dexterity to produce material goods 
for consumption. Aria's intellectual 
community must nurture and pro- 
mote the region's unique heritage, 
especially those dements in its cul- 
ture and traditions which will help 
enrich universal society. The most 
fundamental erf these elements relate 
to the harmony of society — to such 
thin gs as good governance, the sanc- 
tity of the family, tolerance toward 
diversity, and compassion for the 
weak and die unfortunate. 

There is another challenge for 
Asia. In recent years there has been 
an overwhelming, almost imperialis- 


tic diffusion of Western or Westcrn- 
inflnenced cultural products. This 
has been made possible, and will be 
further accelerated, by the opening of 
the skies to satellite television net- 
works. It would not be too difficult 
for Asian countries to gain control of 
the communication technologies to 
mount a counteroffensive. 

But this would be meaningful 
only if we could offer cultural pro- 
ducts that successfully competed for 
the free choice of a universal audi- 
ence. This is a challenge to Asian 
creativity and imagination. 

Asia’s increasing prosperity 
means that it is now in a position to 
offer serious alternatives to the 
dominant global political social and 
economic arrangements. However, 
we most first engage ourselves vigor- 
ously in the debate on the burning 

issues of cm times, such as democra- 
cy, h uman rights, economic policy 
and cultural Identity. In the same 
way as we define our economic and 
political priorities, we most articu- 
late and construct our own intellec- 
tual and cultural agendas. 

Imenunional Herald Tribune. 


America Is Better Off Without a 'National Identity’ 


N EW YORK — The Clinton ad- 
ministration has unveiled its 


By Richard Sennett 


plan to bring Americans together. 
Sheldon H ack n ey, chairman of tbe 


Sheldon Hackney, chairman of tbe 
National Endowment for the Hu- 
manities, announced this month that 
the government would hold a series 
of televised “town meetings’’ aimed 
at overcoming ethnic rivalries. They 
will explore the boods of community, 
the meaning of American identity 
and “bow inmugrant groups fit into 
the American dream." 

It is easy to sympathize with what 
Mr. Hackney, BUI Clinton and other 
sponsors of tbe forums want to 
achieve. They aim to challenge the 
inward- turning racial ethnic and sex- 
ual zealotry that denies America a 
common civic culture. Yet this is a 
deeply wroagfacaded project 

First, it looks back on an America 
that never existed. From the begin- 
ning American society has been fo- 
mented by differences of wealth reli- 
gion and language, as well as by the 
conflicts between slave and nonslave 
states. The waves of immigration af- 
ter tbe Qvil War did not break apart 


a unified nation; they added new 
diversities to old divisions. 

In some ways, we Americans are 
. more divided today than daring that 
first great immig ran t wave. Tor ex- 
ample, because onr society has be- 
come more open sexually, marriage 
and family no longer trace a dear 
design in people’s lives. 

Mr. Hackney is tbe latest in a long 
line of Americans wbo have sought to 
counter society’s fissures by discover- 
ing a national identity or an Ameri- 
can character. These phrases, howev- 
er. merely display the gentlemanly 
face of nationalism. 

Nationalism creates a mythic land 
in which people understand them- 
selves and eacn other. The myth dis- 
guises inequalities end le gitimate at- 
tacks on people whose lives are 
different Immigrants wbo q»nf to 
America three or four generations ago 
thus encountered great prejudices 
based on tbe supposed fact that they 
weren't yet "real Americans." 

Does Mr. Hackney feel bad about 


this? Of course he does. Yet he asserts 
that it is “much better to start talking 


tions and expressions of sympathy: 
“I feel your pain.” These sorts of 
events toad to oversimplify our divi- 
rions and exclude the confusions in- 
herent in real experience. 


about American identity before Jet- iarenf in rear experience. 

ting into immigration issues.” -tins In intimate Jifft adults -connect to 

' opposes an Atnerica that is obscured one another in part by accepting that 


The U'S.-Saudi Line Is Off the Hook 


W ASHINGTON — Three years 
after the United Stales went 
to war to protea Saudi Arabia's ns- 


By Jim Hoagland 


Saudi Arabia says, “legitimizes au- 
thoritarian rule.” 


dereround oceans of ofl, there is no 
UiT ambassador in Rivadh and no 


U-S. ambassador in Riyadh and no 
prospect that one will soon be there. 
The case of tbe missing envoy is 2 
small signal of a dangerous drift in 
one of America s most important 
foreign relationships. 

George Bush's top priority in un- 
leashing Operation Desert' Storm 
was to protect the Saudi royal fam- 
ily. Mr. Bush’s energy policy, I not- 


The United States has 
been without an 
ambassador in Riyadh 
since August 1992 . 


ed at the time, consisted of King 
Fahd’s telephone number. The king 
seems to have faOen off tbe White 
House Rolodex since Bill Clinton 
toe* over the switchboard. 

Communication has grown sparse 
just as the kingdom approaches a 
crucial political moment in its slow 
but unsteady progress toward a 
more representative form of govern- 
ment. There is no high-level Mr. or 
Ms. Saudi Arabia in this American 
administration to pay attention to or 
influence the changes that man y 
Saudis believe are coming. 

If anything, Saadi Arabia's ener- 
gy importance to America should 
Have increased since the 1991 war 
liberated Kuwait and drove the 
Iraqi Republican Guard back from 
the Saudi frontier. Last month for- 
eign oti imports grew to 49 percent 
of America s daily consumption of 
17 million barrels of oil One out of 
every 10 barrels of o3 consumed in 
America now comes from Saudi 
Arabia, which seifs " million barrels 
erf oil abroad even- day. Tbe Saudis 
d ominat e the worid market. 

Saudi policymaker have told 
Arab colleagues that they have no 
dear idea what the Clinton team 


wants on oD pricing and production 
or bow the rising trend of U.S. oil 
imports fits, or does not fit into 
Mr. Clinton's energy policy. 

Tbe once dose political consulta- 
tion that revolved around Riyadh’s 
high-profile ambassador in Wash- 
ington. Prince Bandar bin Sultan, is 
a pale shadow of its old self today. 
Prince Bandar bad access to tbe 
White House in the Reagan and 
Bush years that no other foreign 
diplomat has ever had. He commit- 
ted Saudi Arabia’s financial and 
military backing to U.S. intelli- 
gence activities in Central America, 
Afghanistan and tbe Middle East. 

Today be is little glimpsed on the 
Washington diplomatic circuiL He 
spends his time negotiating with 
American companies and the Penta- 
gon to slow down the deliveries of 
and payments for the U.S. airliners 
and weapons tlat Saudi Arabia has 
contracted to buy. Falling oil reve- 
nues have produced a budgetary cri- 
sis for Saudi Arabia, a fact that Ri- 
yadh feels is not sufficiently ap- 
preciated in Washington. 

Consider this analysis of one 
Saudi expert Saudi Arabia today is 
taking in about J^Obflfenm annu- 
al revenue from oQ and is commit- 
ted to spending S45 billion, includ- 
ing 56 billion on interest payments. 
King Fahd will not raise the minor 
taxes that Saudis pay and is totally 
dependent on ofl revenues. He re- 
portedly checks oil prices three 
times a day. 

A steady slide in prices has done 
nothing to improve tbe king’s noto- 
riously volume humor. Due to visit 
the l/ntHv? Si-ifnc fnr medical ex- 


it is a situation in which tbe 
United States needs its equivalent 
of a Bandar in Riyadh (especially 
since Bandar is no longer Bandar 
in Washington): Someone who is 
well -connected politically, know- 
ledgeable about the host country 
and both activist and subtle 
enough to tip events in a positive 
direction fsuch as enlarging de- 
mocracy) when a word or a deed is 
sought from a foreign envoy. 

Instead, tire United States has 
been without an ambassador erf my 
kind in Riy adh since August 1992. 
After ini tiki indications that the 
post would go to a busnessman 
Friend of Bm proved wrong, Mr. 
Clinton accepted the State Depart- 
ments career candidate, Edward 
W. Gnehm Jr- who won favorable 
notice for his performance as am- 
bassador to Kuwait during and af- 
ter Desert Storm. 

But Mr. Gnehm's nomination 
flics in the face of tbe Saudi royal 
family’s distaste for envoys wbo 
have served in smaller, less impor- 
tant Gulf countries. Moreover, his 
statements urging democracy on 
Kuwait were noticed by the king 
The Saudis. I am told, are refusing to 
approve or disapprove Mr. Gnehm's 
nommation. Instead they let it twist 
slowly in the desert wind. 


by the presence of outadera, an 
America waiting for us once we stop 
obsessing about our differences. 

Of course, die wary notion erf an 
American idmtity is a sweeping ste- 
reotype, and tbe manipulation -of 
such generalizations lies at the very 
heart of nationalism. 

Tbe first wave of immigran ts ro- 
asted falling under tbe sway orf 
American stereotypes. as Damef Pat- 
rick Moymhan and Nathan Glazer 
showed in their classic study “Be- 
yond the Melting Pol” Immigrants 
and their hors sought to present a 
more complex and mixed experience 
of cultural identity. 

. Also, stereotyped thinking wiD in- 
variably pay more attention to divisive 
rabble-rousera than to sophisticated 
thinkers about ethnic problems. In 
such a scenario, as A1 Surmon would 
easily overwhelm a Cornel west 

When people deal in stereotypes, 
they seek to define “us" in contrast to 
a threatening “other." Member of ra- 
cial minorities {or homosexuals, immi- 
grants, the elderly) face the problem 
19th century immigrants faced. It is 
not so moor the danger of turning 
inward — a real temptation for any ' 
threatened groq> — as the more subtle 
challenge of bror to avoid bring de- 
fined by someone else. . 

Not only is Mr. Hackney’s blue- 
print for culture flawed in principle, 
it is perverse in practice: 

In the televised town meetings, 
people will be given air time to ex- 
plain themselves to each other. Mr. ■ 
Hackney says he warns "to give peo- 
ple a sense they have been h eard,** 
This is one of the oldest American 
techniques for dealing with commu- 
nal tension. It began with the Puri- 
tans and was adopted and updated . 
by psychological meaty a generation 
ago in encounter groups and con- 
saousnKs- raising sessions. 

In this kind of meeting, people do 
not decide riiings- Tn ytt-ad they at- 
tempt to rouse sentiments of shari ng 
and community through seif-revda- 


one another in part by accepting that 
they cannot oftenunderstand one an- 
other. Public discourse about “what 
we share" ignores tins fact. And Mr. 
Hackney’s “national conversation" 
wiQ exdude from the televised pic- 
ture those who do not eaaty open 
themselves up and commune. 

Given the complexities of Ameri- 
can. society today, it is immensely 
important that people find ways to 
act together with those they do not 
understand or whom they dislike 
when they do understand. 

Tbe Cfinton administration's fin- 
est achievements, like tbe North 
American Free. Trade Agreement; 
have acknowledged that America is 
not an island. Mr. Clinton has rightly 
sought to address, as in his proposed 
health care plan, collective problems 
that affect different Americans in 
radically different ways. - 

Perhaps Mr. Hackney’s project is a 
symptom of how burdensome these 
reroonstbiUties and realities feel 
Tafiting about how .we see each other 
and bow we can come together is 
modi more pleasant than reshaping 
the real America. Bat because this 
sort of pleasure has brought such 
terrible nationalistic and xenophobic 
co n seq u ences in the past (and now as 
weH especially in the former Yugo- 
slavia), I don t think this “national 
conversation" should be shrugged off 
as just another nuIlkm-doDartdUy. 

The challenge and the p m m b y of 
American society Ke in finding ways 
of acting together withont invokir^ 
the evil of a shared national identity. 
To do so we need to draw on our 
capa city to cooperate rather than on 
onr desire to commune. 

Mr. Hackney, by contrast, seems 
to offer a Serbian solution to tbe 
c hallen g e of hving with one another. 


Jh* writer, professor of the humcm- 


wn«&aed this comment to 
The New York Times. 


m OURPAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894k Drama in Dublin 


LONDON — A rather serious acci- 
dent occurred at the Gaiety Theatre, 


Dublin, on Monday [Jan. 29] night. 
Two of tiie girls who were perform- 
ing in tbe ballet ai the pantomime 
were in a dressing-room which was 
situaced ai the rear of tire theatre 


This is a sign of deeper underly- 
ing complications in tbe Saudi-UJ& 


continued on the German col onies in - 
the Pacific and in Africa, in the pre- 
ssnceof tire representatives of tire 
pommions.-In tbe afternoon satis- 
factory provisional arrangements 
watt reached for dealing with the ' 
Uennan colonies and- the occupied 
temtoiy in Turkey -in-Asia. 


the United Slates for medical ex- 
ams early this year, be is increasing' 
ly isolated and uncommunicative, 
according to some accounts. 

Alter long delays, the king has 
delivered on a promise to appoint 
a respected council of advisers, 
known as tire Majlis. But he main- 
tains absolute power tinder a con- 
stitution lh flf . as one resident of 


relationship that need urgent, high- 
level attention. 

If Mr. Clinton wants him as his 
envoy, he will need to invest Mr. 
Gnehm with his fun authority and 
support, waging a campaign at his 
behalf throughout his tour. If tire 
president is not prepared to do that, 
it will mean haring to drop the 
Gnehm nommation, despite the 
ambassador's evident virtues and 
tire embarrassment that it wiK came 
at the State Department. 

Time and events press in Saudi 
Arabia. It is no time to stand an 
diplomatic niceties. 

The Washington Post. 


■ Mi* Another Armada- 

crashed through tire roof of the AT AN AMERICAN FLYING 
dressing room /busying both the FORTRESS BASE. Somewhero Th 
young women m a- mass of bncks, England — {From our New Ytirfc • 

edition:] Another armada orf Amen- 
can heavy bombers, covwed by.ah 


mortar and slates, and mffcuug ee- . 
vere injuries upon them. They ' were 
then carried to Mercer’s Hospital 
where their injuries were attended to. 


1919: German Colonies 


PARIS —Tbe President of the Unit- 
ed States, tire Prime Mhuszos and 
Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the 
Allied and Associated Powers, as well 
as the Japanese representatives, to- 
‘ day JJam 30] bold two meetings at the 
quai tFOrsay. The exchange of views 


Germany ag ain- ro- 
of bombs in Brunswick, an afreraft 
tactojy center of the Reich, 450 miles 
tirm England, and rahrbad yhnb « 

xiannvrr ..i ■ ■> j ■ 


^Brunswick. Bntfo bombs** .ftfc 
up the American aerial on- - 

tbe third time ia ^our* n ffirc 




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fggf IB K ESjstfac&3aas.< 

rriifmafional Herald Tribune, Monday, January 31, 1994 


CAPITAL MARKETS 


Canada and Australia Lead 


ip and Theory . 


Investors’ Paper Chase 


A Look at 4 Foreign Firms ^ b ^J Bal,g 

** ' r> ' * Washington Pan Srrrict 


; ByCarf Gewirtz ; ^ ' • ' 

! ' International HeraM Tribune 

P ARIS — international bpnd mvestots have fared ben so 
far this yearpladng their nwneyia, Canadian.; and Austra- 
Ban -doPar paper. The J. P. Morgan government bond 
index ^showslt^anreocy gainyoi percart-m, Canada 
• and \S percent in Australia. 

Spun and Denmark were next on the list, with, the United States 
I in fifth position fora gam of barely more than 1 perceuLJapanisai 
• the bottom of .the list, re gistering a. loss of 2,6 percent as yields 

■ haVe backed up nearly 40 basis 
! points over the month- " 

Measuring perfomrance . 


. prodded 
i recent 


Finance Uuet 
Seeks to Widen 
Indian Reforms 


•ette 


r McasuimB pwivitUttiito r- * “ ■ -“i. 

' based on a common currency — were next Oil the 
! the U3-. dollar — Australian __ «. 

■ bonds ranked first, boosted by a J. JtV MorgWl DoL 

53 percent appreciation against 1 — ; _ — -r 

the U.S. currency: Sweden, 


ranked sixth bdiind the^^^^^al£S^l«g^gi^5^^ 

percent appreciation of thelcrcma. • . „ 

Analysts at Union Bank of Switzertand cmrendyare wmrng 
that it is time to take, profits in the Swedish maiket-Tl^y ncaeffial 
10-year yields at 6j68 percent are at abistonc lownnd amymm 
neatly I percentage point advantage ov«- G«man 
fortablyvSn. At the start of the y«r, *e.yiddOT.^^ 
was 1 .42 percentage points, or 142 basts points, ora^OTmteve^ 
Eksportfmam and Nordic Investment Bank^bo^ tapp^the 


lead to chaos. Too much freedom, ihey suggested, may acraauy w 
the enemy of free markets. j stagnant Russia 

SSS 55 SC sssre E? £ 3 Kft»-i= 


There is write good demand tor canamim -LI” 

swap^te'unatrcactive there is a dearth of noikCan^an issuos 

PI OnJario^^ fehfflk® Canadian dofair($?47 

Sdtffijulk of thSre was placed m an 

estimated 35 percent add in Earppe and 10 ;P®S^^ri^ks line 

ISSs23^SwSiBS5S 


nsustainable, and will bring on, at iea« - — — 

c r w A Son he. When big shots from Johnson s neao 

SbtwStS markrti is Hke. rShat they see is both encouragmg 
they see stoves spattered with 

aMctao. ^ 

■^s^-Cirst oppo^ty *• - »■ 

Hn. 


They also see homes that attract swarms of mosquitoes at mght 

«n^vrtVT no Huu. 11 


See PROFILES, Page 12 


^ _ Foreign executives said tney nave 
boSguarfs to protect themselves from ^S^ers. ^ 

T® *55SSK3W: free martc* scans to have 

See COMPARE, Page 12 


By Kevin Murphy 

International HeraM Tribune 

NEW DELHI — Finance Minis- 
ter Majunoban Singh, having mas- 
terfully survived a major financial 
yynrial and riding a groundswell of 

^^ssasc 

aH ^vm] d m^or economy m°^s 
are expected to be unvnled in me 
□riddle of February, including tax 
cuts, increased opening for imports 
and foreign investment, cost-cut- 
ting, and enhanced privatizations. 

“This budget has to be an accel- 
eration of the reform process, said 

Mr Singh, who was presented wim 

a mandate for greater change earli- 
er this month by Prime Minister 
p. V. Narasimha Rao. We cannot 

stand star . . 

At the same time, Mr. Singh is 
turning India’s attention toward 
the surcessful fast-growing eco- 
nomic of East Asia. . 

India's current push to broaden 
reform comes less than three years 
after economic crisis prompted Mr. 
Singh and Mr. Rao’s governing 
Congress (1) Party to make ratol 
changes to an mwmd-lookmg econ- 
omy that was quickly going broke. 

Now the country's exports are 
surging, the rupee is party ““'*2; 
ible and strengthening, and foreign 
investors are scrambling for a stake 
in mushrooming local businesses via 
_ jImih invKtmenls in sec- 


direction. There is no prospect of 
these changes being reversed. 

But the man most closelv jdenu- 
fied with a changing India must 
balance the need for further re- 
structuring against the denands oj 
the nation's enormous underclass. 
At the same time, be warned 
against unrealistic expectauons of 
a “Big Bang" style budget. 

“1 am confident any informed ob- 
server of the Indian economy knows 
India's potential. India's problems 



See INDIA, Page 10 


Singapore 
To Expand 

In East Asm 



in rniLMII UUIUUIFi 

| *»«■* * ° stocks or direct investments in sec- 

German Metal Workers Take Risky Path ^35233 

Vf Vi .1 1 1 fMMM. J- . -i r.-un- are o ffiaaB v demanding a 10 ^ massive public sector, and dis- 

— ,* r.rc« with a front-page title that reads inrrene while union bargain- mantle a permit system for pro^J 

business that interfered m nwriy 
every aspect of industry, have 
trriYirnftd Inflation and spurred an- 
nual economic growth of 5 percent. 

Mr Singh said his government, 
which only recently gained a ma- 
iority in parliament, was m ns 
strongest position yet to attack the 
vested interests blocking furthfii re- 
forms. “If we look at *e results of 
various opinion polls, there is the 
broadest possible support for 
changes," hesaid. “1 am conBdrat 
that this process can go only m one 


S^^SSmds for higher Wpdjob 
SSS SI -n» world must think we re 

^Wi’th more than half of all compantem 

Germany’s vast antomotiye. etoTom^st^ 
SS-wodringmABtncs Iwmgm^- the 
fert walkouts oocarred over the 
About 150 workers pat down tbcar toms aia 
.. « om«f hv Siemens AG even 


this struggle would aeienmuc t- 


SMtfBssaSgg 

in pay when tens of thousands of pend* are«» 
S ajob Uves in doud-cuckoo land. ^ p ned- 
bdm Ost, an economics adviser to Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl ^ ^ 

• — — ~l rn ifVK 


could do f&t for ; 3 mA the future strength of the Gtamm 

SSS* n . introduce m 


sSbaW-SEfto jssaa;...*—- 


°Soycn seek a license to introduce an 

See CSRMANY, Page 10 


By Michael Richardson 

liuemnional HemJJ Tribune 
SINGAPORE — Lacking space 
of its own Tor economic expansion, 
Singapore plans to invest a growing 
proportion of its foreign -ex ckmge 
reserves, currently worth about S46 
billion, in the fast-growing Asia- 
Pacific region. 

Prime Minister Goh Cbok Tong, 
who returned Sunday from a visit 
to India, said that under a nw 

strategy the government would 

probably invest 30 percent to 35 
percent of the reserves m the 
emerging economies of the region 
over the next 10 to 15 years. 

But he said that Singapore would 
move cautiously, starling with prdy 
about 2 percent or 3 percent of the 
reserves as it identified promising 
countries and economic sectors. 

Until recently, Singapore s poli- 
cy was to invest its national re- 
serves in relatively safe blue-chip 
investments and bonds m devel- 
oped countries. . . . 

Analysis said that much of the 
new flow of Singapore capital was 
likely to go to India. Vietnam. Bur- 
ma. Cambodia and Sn Lanka, as 


See SINGAPORE, Page 10 


rraiJdort Bank Tries 
Unusual Selling Point: 
Political Correctness 

Dv Prnndim tfitcheMT 


NEWS EVENTS WHICH COULD AFFECT 
Y OUR UFE: 




% 


By Brandon Mitchener 

International Herald Tribune 

huve it ury cte wa* 

„ “ VZ Tom TYTrwnote sodallv and environmental^ ®®*f 


>Ihe r^mritadngstrug^fin- Bosnia^ 

I jjie eetmonue explosbin in China 


tun 



. s 


Europe?# m ., 3 

f The road to peaee in tite Mtdeast 




on its 

KMS15 UJVi^ » «"■» 

vriiat it lacks in size, Okobank makes up 
f OT ^ spunk. Its sixth year bejgj 

with ^Sb w> riw music erf a S^up 

TM^nkera.’’ Its idlers -wear jeans and 

aStefro work, and the dmman, who re- 
cently turned 33 , sports aponytail t-id-back Borahdm 

At the bank's mm entrance to a brigrt, 

district, a vine label^ "mowqr -^er while their parents talk 

warm lOT .'* e ^^?S^eaKarcleiby wide* Aay 1 ^ 
money at a kffl&wwodeatawemran^:^ coffee madrine brews an 

plugs an 

-ttSSSJto =phdn <he 

the Okobaulc ni its dfents sru fanaics. 
T° totoa^ ; ^g°^, 1 f manMn t to. uuJdug money. 




**»***- 


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— — 31-1-94 

Yes l^todcrt^nglhalHT.Tteslteul^^lm'l^to 

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□ XI monlhs (^issues in d with 52 bonuss^l- 
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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 1994 


WIIKLY INTERNATIONAL BOND PRICES 


|jMf Cun jwn Pile* Y1 ‘ 1 Trw 


Crf. 

Mm Cpn. 


Crt 

Pm* Qxl 




Of.' » 
fine# Cpn. 


Provided by Credit Suisse First 
Boston Limited, London, Tet 
322 40 00. Prices may vary 
according to market conditions 
and other factors. Jan. 28 


issuer G* M* Price YW Trw Dollar ZOTOS 


fewer Con Mor Prist Y 14 Trjy 


jgpHgftwXun SH al 
JaoHoiMMr 5% 00 
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Htnc9eJunM 
KmcBbAuoM 
HitxfcAWM 
HuKHStOXI 
HmeSoJlV* 
Hmc 4 QJMiazi 
Hnc3oAc 


Dollar Straights 


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CPQ M« Price YU Trs» 


Komol Air Jut 0W M 
Kune* Air Oct Ata » 


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Alta Jill 7V, © 

AOt/Jun «k GO 
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Belgium Mr Oft n 
Selglurn Feb I 97 


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calmllor Feb 
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CcCBMOV 
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OMiNVFeb 

CnamNv Feb 

Om nv Feb 
Own N» Feb 
Own Ny Feb 
Own Nv Feb 
ChcmNv Feb 
CrUaUieo 
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Denmark Aug 

EdSea 

EWnortlOd 

Exxon Car Aug 

Exxon Nov 

F*1 Fad Feb 

GdfMr 

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CeccMr 

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GenMIftAug 

GtaiMllbAug 

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Ireland Mr 
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Italy Jim 
Italy Jun 
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□tabu El Mr 7 ta 
□tabu El Sen 10ft *5 
□tabu £1 Sen 8to 98 
Qtaaa Si Feb 7 97 

OtaBoElMay n ta 

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NASDAQ NATIONAL 


Soles In Net 

100* High Lon Close CJfge 


Solos In Net 

100s High LOW Close Chfte 


Sales In Net 

100s High Lew Close CJifte 


Soles (o Nei 

loot HWi Low Ctose Cb'ge 


Sales In (tef 

loot HWi Low ctoe 01*00 


Soles in Net 

TOO* High Low Clan Ch «* 


OTC Cansofi dated trading for week 
ended Friday, Jan. 28. 


Softs in 

100s High Low 


Net 

Close Cb'ge 


bmE& wr 


Softs In Not 

100s High Low Ctose Cb'ge 


A Pea Pod 
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ADCs TH5SS38 

ADESA 941 14 

AEL 442 0ft 

ASPs j 07 J 2AT1 IJft 

AEREn 35310ft 

AESCP IJOOa 26 71»3Sft 
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s§| *s.if ir* 


-A,. 


_ Mjs « «-* 

M JSJT* 2 ?to + » 
»4su a io%+-% 


110419* ITto If +tt 
6750 15% 13V 15 + tt 


31*613 »* Uta— ft . 

561010 158 . 57 —ft 
N re I 


631 1% Tft 1ft— V 
332 l\ fta l<k + ta 

4» 4 Jtt JV— ft 


450 4 J* Jto— ft 
4» 7ft Tta Tft -Mb 
115? a'fa »ta a + ft 
964021ft 17V 2Dtt— % 

BBW a u HIT 8S r 

gjg; .3 s5 ,M SE,y 35 K 

Donegal J2 1 7 47} ir if lift 
Q onfccw 375tt% m in- ft 

□rctlHu tt Al 307 76ft 16 lift 



17 17ft— 1 FrttEPt 

» 3 3—1 Freds 

m, 10ft— 1 FrshCh 
7 - 7ft— % Fmter 
ISft u Fiyvm 

Uta 14 +% grtaa m 

4% 4%-tt frfHJtr, 

11 V 11 V— to Frift 


MK + to 52 ^* 
ptt + % 

M — ft Fulqw 


25V 27 +’to PtUrHO 
lift 12to 4- ft Cpnon 
< 4* + ft Funca 

22ft 23 +i Foron 




SS& « S §3«S mi x"ti 

u ”nw» i» t» 

m m? ^ 

FrnSm, ,12 ^ M 63 l 7 to 16 

EmT *■« 5SSS5 

ass 


S ^t £s . 


is 


• 3st '^Tpp- . 

111 . "■ 

V./Sfusett- 

* 


13ft MV Put NOW 

*>k S— ft r 1 


ISta— 2ft 
Wit Jr 
Mw— W 
W, + B 

«S5 a a v 




Jl % 


’•Sil 


Mto.-2S%.Y ft 


- tCSfetaS: 










JppjJl c ** y ± sj > 


tmtcun aTIONAL HERALD TKIBmE, MONDAY, JANUARY 31. 1994 


Page 9 


SHORT COVER wowg^rocKS in review 

1 . (h tam 


: : i ft 


U.S. Madbin^Tool OrdersUpSteeply 

I s ' NEW YORK (AP) — Mannfacmrere' ordare for machine tools rose 
sharply in December from the previous month, riding the economic 
recovery to significant gams for the year! 

The Association for Manufacturing Technology reported Sunday that 
machine-tool orders rose 37.4 percent to$319. i miTK rav, reversmg-a drop 
;of nearly 4 percent in November to 52323 mSBon. December ordersvrere 
up 54.8 percent from the S2062 bOEon reported for December T 991' For 
>the .year, machine tool orders rose 322 perceorto $3-28 billion, from 
' 52.48 billion in 1992. ' 

"Diomiberwas thebest month of the fourth quarter for a majority of the 

S builders,’* said the association's president, Albert Moore.. 

Rises 1.8% at South China Post 

0NG (Bloomberg) — Smith Qdha Morning Post (Hold- 
Robe^Kn^^dtSt^ aftertax profit rose.1.8 percait to 


via A0MOB fianca Pray 

Amsterdam 

. AMSTERDAM — Interest-rate concerns 
prompted caution among investors on the Am- 
sterdam share market last week- , 

The CBS all-share index was slightly ^ 
289.70 poinis, down from 290.40 on the previous 
Friday, a-fall of barely a quarter of apereent. 
Interest-senatir/esl^ 

tarficalarfinandals ING and ABN-Amro, and 
the property mvespeoi funds. However, these 

sto^nnde up formed of their tosses on report 

of strong Ul growth and lw mflatwn. 


ian tvODcn. kook, saiaumi ns anenaxprom rcw.i.opciwut w 
ton Hong Kong doQais ($33.1 nnOhm) in its. financial Em half 
c. 31. Sates rose 1 1 percent to 59(15 million dollars. 

mnanip . nil w pli vuiU'iokoo V (VMf/c /*ltl AtlfUl Fjlff- 


ag competition 
niai Press Giroi 


1WD WIUUJJ W OS4JWU1W iw ^ fllll — 

■language daily, the Eastern Express.. The other 


IH'^'-Ty iKiirapapvi un. iwugunig jm iium m. ■ ■ 

■ Arms 15 say that SCMFs costs have risen in. recent months as rt * 

' pre^ife to fight off the new competitor. It has raised wages for some of ■ « 
: - its iiimahsts- to prevent them from defecting to the rival, has revamped ® 
. 5 son: ^ctkms.of the piper and has introduced special promotions. ^ 

Exjfbatded H.K. Insurer Is Upbeat •' 

’ h - 10NG KONG fBloomberg) — Hong Kong’s sewnd-large^,Kfe .. 
in^T ftncft concern. National Mutual Asia, says that it has managed to 
£ rain around 2,800 of its 3300 sales agents despite an alleged smear 
*• : i camaign intended to disoefit - the company. . . ; . i- 

- rhe 85 percent of the agents retained is 15) from an .estugte of 75 
nrcent riven by the company, which is controlled by Anstrahan msur- 

• ; sce eroup National Mutual Life, in the nskkfleof last week- 

E ; National Mutual- has sued its former chtefexecatrye, Andrew YaM, . 

id three other former employees for the alleged campaign to damage the 
-- •? jmpany.lt said that anonymous faxes were sent to newspapersm 

; ■ ustndiaand Hong Kongin recent weeks questioning the parmtcqmF«r 

I : y*s commitment to the Hong Kong operation and the group s nranaai 

- <S ^biHty. Mr. Yang resigned from National Mutual Asia on Jan. . 20, •. - 

Kievan Wins Malaysia Dam Project 

?• - 

?. Sda I5SSS JS^Sbm^hydrodectrto poww generating 

■- : facility ait Bakun in Sarawak Jitate, the company ^d. . . „ 

:• - . The 2.40G-megawatt project win take 10 years to W I 

•; iivire theSmS state Koverranenlr to take a sake of 1 


Fokker was shMply higher on new orden, up 

12 percent at 24.70 guilders. 

Frankfurt - 

... prices rose last we&, although inv«toreware 
nervous and unable to discern a' 

DAX index fimshed the week at 2,133.47 prints 
on Friday, up by 279 percent from the previous 

"SfiSS' VS* MBoa DM frara B* 

S SKS‘S KJO DM on lbe 
w^Ssh at 8133Q, Dresdner Bank three 
to 418, and Commerzbank 830 Al- 

lianz Insurance gained 51 marks to end at -.757. 

* &X^^9.6Q DM to 715. but trou- 
bled group Metaligesellschaft was unchanged 

at 238 DM. 

1 London 

1 Profit-taking cot about 1 percent off the Fi- 
nancial Times -Stock Exchange 100-share index 

; last wedt as investors cashed m on reamt g^s. 

TbeFT-SE 100 fdQ 363 points, to 3,447.4 pomts. 
The market rallied from steeper losses on 
■ 'Friday, frilowing a sharper-tban-expected nse 


in US. gross domestic product in the fourth 

qi Tberttafl sector was hard hit with Sainsbury, 
the leading upennarket chain, down by 67 
wnhe £ to 393 pence afw ^inqunc- 
mgFriday that it was writing off £365 million 
because of real estate depreciation- 
W H. Smith, which announced an 11 percent 
mercase^ its half-year profits, fell by 30 pence 
to 515 after its chair man made cautious com- 
ments about the outlook for the sector. 

OH shares were weakened by a negative note 
from Kleinwort Benson, Lasmo fell six pence to 
124 and BP lost 1 13 pence to 367. 

Milan 

The Mibtel index rose shaiplv last week, 
pushed up by foreign investors and the hopeor 
STc^wmc upturn- pohncal news 

also helped fuel the positive mood, with the 
market rising by almost 498 points to 1036*, a 

attracted forrip 

interest, with Sip gaining 9.61 P«rcem £ 3335 
and Stet rising 420 poont W 4,486 lire. 

FtaL on the verge of announcing us 1993 
earnings, rose 3.59 percent, 4361 hre. 


years. Michelin jumped 4.08 percent and Peu- 
geot 339 percent. 

Singapore 

Prices rose last week, with the Straits Times 
Industrials index up 1834 pomts to clow a 
2300.07 points, a gain of 0.8 
broader-based All-Singapore SES mdn added 
223 points to finish at 597.90. up 0.37 P cr< JP l - 
Dealers said it was a week of volatile trading 
with share prices fluctuating in 1 tandem 1 with ^the 
□fice movemeuts in Malaysia. Malaysian shares 
uaded here also dropped sharply on ranora 
that the central bank was taking steps to stop 
speculation in the ringgit- 

Tokyo 

Prices fell on concern about political uncer- 
tainly. The Nikkei Stock Average of 225 select- 
ed issues fell 549.55 prints, or f * paocm, to 
18,757.88 prims after rising 333.73 points the 
previous week. 

The Nikkei 225 P ,U ?S^ 5 percent on Mom 
dav. its steepest one-day slide in 
and-a-half ^ _Brok«s saidthc ^ump ™ 


Codelco Says Error 
Cost It $200 Million 


Paris 

The Bourse rose during thin trading lastweek 
as the market took time ^ 
rises. The CAC 40 index Gmshed at 2313.1/ 
Stots, a 3.08 percent rise and 692 pomts ahead 
of the previous week’s final figure. 

The market has stfll not picked op pace after 
huge rises in December and was hoping for 
Bank of France moves on interest rates. 

LVMH remained in strong demand, gaining 
1.19 percent on Friday thanks to a mimiby 
its dudxman that an acquisition will take place 
in the luxury products sector in the coming 


1 uuu " — : - 

nomic stimulus package. 

Zurich 

Swiss stocks ended higher last week on hopes 
that interest rates could be cut soon. The Svnss 
Pdonnance Index gained 50.97 points to fimsh 
on 1.986.61 a rise of 16 percait. 

Roche was in strong demand among English 
and German investors after an optimistic press 
report on the group, its price jumping 445 to 

7> Nestle, helped by an improvement in interna- 
tional exchange rates, gained 83 to 1,4UG. 


Compiled by Our Suiff Firm Dispatches a 
SANTIAGO — Stun| by incor- f 

rea futures trading. Ouk Corner 
Corp. on Sunday raised to S200 
million from $100 miUion its earlier 

estimate of losses and said its prob- 
lems included gold and silver as 
well as previously announced cop- 
per contracts. , 

*Codelco‘s presidenL Alqandro 1 
Noctni, said the estimated loss ; 
from copper futures contracts has 
Un Sd 10 1150 mltton from 
5100 and the estimated loss from 
gpld and silver futures amounts to 
S50 million. , .. 

Codelco is the world s leading 
copper producer. It accountsforb 
penxni of Chile’s gross do®«trc 
product and 19 percent of exports 
m 1993. 

Ust week, the company report- 
ed that a futures trader, deputy 
sales manager Juan Pablo Davila, 
was under arrest, and that his ini- 
tial misreading of a futures transac- 
tion on lus computer screen could 
cost the company a third of ns 
estimated 1993 earnings of 5470 
million before taxes. . 

According to Mr. Noemi, Mr. 
Davila, who beaded the company s 
futures department, made a mis- 
take in executing a futures contract 
in September and began to lose 
money while he thought he was 
m aking money. 

Codelco uses futures to hedge 


against swings in the price of cop- 
per. However, Mr. Davila also was 
allowed to speculate on the pnee of 
copper up 10 a limit of 20,000 tons, 
or$l million in losses. If losses on a 
futures contract exceeded SI mu- 
lioa. he was required to register ihe 
loss immediately. 

-That wrong position on his 
computer was then showing prof- 
^TtSen he made the same oper- 
ation and made, he thoughU a sec- 
ond profit." said the executive. 

Almost five weeks later Mr. Da- 
vila realized that what he “ought 
were profits of 530 million 10 S40 
million were in fact huge losses. He 
began to hide the information, 
while continuing to bet on copper 
prices, hoping to reverse the losses, 
said the Codelco executive. 


“We are pretty certain that there 
is no fraud,” the executive said. 
"He was just hiding the positions 
and then he opened new positions 
to make up the losses. But that also 
went wrong, because he took a view 
of the market and prices went 
against ihai view ” he said. 

At the request of President Patri- 
cio Avlwin, the Supreme Court has 
appointed a judge to lead the inves- 
tigations into the irregularities. 

price Waterhouse & Co. in Sanu- 
agp is helping Codelco in its internal 

investigation. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg) 


? iivite the Saiwak state govmnrKnt to take a 

■’ • ttreemin theproject Ecotoguasraticra theph 
; tie dealing of 200.000 hectares (495,000 acre) 
'• Thw project win involve the constructions 1 


I of forest. ' . 

a dam and lake covering 





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Compe*« i ^ c . itas ^ s * 

further inform 


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T=V.'?r*'i'r 






g 's topics: 

j| TTiose Rubles To Print 

Bets BigOn Chips Again - 

W Reengineered A Comeback 

(■-.Wheemg And Dealing m Malaysia 

o Anwica^ Auto Leasing Cars - - 


ROY A I Thai. Airways International is offering mem- 

D bers of Royal Orchid Plus an extra bonus of flying 
free on Business Class to any one of our exotic desti- 
’ in Thailand. 

To qualify for a free return Business Class 
. ticket to any of our 22 destinations in Thailand, just 

C S Ct/j comp i ete 20 First* or Business Class sectors with Thai 

. between February 1, 1994 and May 31, 1994. 

Anv flights between Bangkok and Singapore, Bandar Seri Begawan, 

Jakarta, Denpasar, Manila, Hong Kong, Kaohsiung, Taipei, Seoul, Run- 
ming, Guangzhou, Shanghai, Beijing, Fukuoka, Osaka, Nagoya, Tokyo 

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• Ajjo flights to and horn any of our 11 destinations in Europe, or hve 
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\ So, for example, a return Business Class flight 

from London to Hong Kong via Bangkok will 
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,f you're not already a member of Royal Orchid Plus, join now. 
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after enrolling. 

Pick up an enrolment form from your nearest Thai office ^g|| 
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| r~lMr DMrs DMiss DOther Title_ 



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Page 10 


New International 

Compiled by Laurence Desvfcffis 

Issuer Amount Coup. 

(ntffllons) ■ % 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 1994 



Bond Issues 


Piioe 
Price and 
week 


TtoWng Bate futon 

Bandcsd NqpoG 


$150 1999 0.15 99 JO — 


fear Steams $100 2004 U 100 — 

Compan y 

Con 'nwnwec^ Bank $100 1995 0^0 

Australia 


100 — 


Crediop Oversees 
Bank 

Credit Notional 

General Bectrie 
Capital Corp. 

Ontario 


$200 1999 0.15 99.45 — 


$250 1997 Ebor 9977 - 
$100 1997 0J0 100 ~ 


$2,000 1999 Libor 


Union Bank of Finland $100 19 97 K 


99.595 — 

99.945 — 


HMC Mortgage 
Notes 11 


£100 2021 V* ' 100 — 


Over 6-<oonrti Libor NcncoRabte. Fee* 030% Denominations 
$10,000. {Merri Lynch InflJ 

Belgw 6-roorth Libor. Mnanuni interest 5JWt NonaJoble. 
Fen 03/5%. Deno n i ino ti o ra $100,000. (Beer Statens btfl) 

Over Irranth Libor, if within defined range. NonenMfa. 
Fee* nredsckmd DenomemionsSlOJOO. (Salomon Bredien 
Irel) 

Over 6-month Liber. Noncolabie. Fee* 030%. fCS first 
Boston.) 

Imereti mH be to Jmonth Libor. Cetiabla at par from 1996. 
Few Q.1SK. (CS firct Boston} 

Interest pays 91-day CETE5 phis 021%. NoneofaUe. Fees 
025% (Kidder, Peabody IntTJ 

Interest pays 3-fflomh Libor fat. Nonc o labie crs Inti} 

Over 3-month Libor. Ngneslabie. Feta 0.125% Denomino- 
txxn $100,000. fChertvcd Investment Bank) 

Over 3-mareh Libor, bettered at 99.925. Calobie at par in 
1997. Fees not tfadoscd. P en otnmgf iom £100,000. (Lehman 
Brothers Inti.) 


Notiond & Provincial 
Building Soriety 

£150 

1999 

0.10 

99.98 

— 

Ovar 3-month Libor. CoBabie at par frara 1998. Feas 0.15%. 
Denonnalhmi E1GQJ3M. (Goldman Sachs Int'L) 

SBAB 

Y 15,000 

1999 

Libor 

99.85 

— 

Interest pays 3-month yen Libor Hat. NomuBuUe. Fees 0.30%. 
(Dahva Europe, Fup Inti Hncxtae.) 

SBAB 

Y 15,000 

1999 

0.20 

9970 

" 

Interest is 3monlh yen Lbor plus 0.20%. Manmuai interest is 
470%. NonoaBable. Fees 030%. (Daivra Europe, Fuji toil 
finance-] 

Fixed-Coupons 

Case Natvonale de 
CrficBt AgricoJe 

$100 

1997 

zero 

101 

— 

BeoHeted at per. Bedorptem amrt at maturity vriH he 
Mad to the pedormonce of the Hong Kong stock mdex. Fe« 
1K%. (IBJ Inti] 

Beffobros 

$150 

2002 

m 

99 .99 

— 

Setnmnuofiy. Nonadloble. Fees 1%. Danonsnothtra $10800. 
(Nomura Int'L) 

Osterreichishe 

Postparkasse 

$100 

1995 

AYt 

TOO 


Interest «mB be JH% for each day 3-mondi hafian fare Ubor a 
between 7H% and 9% for toe first 6 months, and between 
6H% md 8H% for toe second 6 months. If Ijbir eoutsde of 

{Creftandab-IMweii] 

Standard Gedif Gird 
Master Trust 

$750 

1999 

Am 

99858 

— 

NonccAabte. Fees 2Mf%. Abo $48 rnffion of notes paying 
4J15% and priced ot 99^71. (GdxmlcJ 

LKBfloden- 

Wuerttemberg 

finance 

DM750 

2008 

6V, 

103 JO 


Beoffered at 100^0. Noncolabie. fijngUa with outstanefing 
inue, raising laid amount to 225 bilion marks. Fees 256%. 
(J-P. Morgan.) 1 

BCX1 Group 

£125 

2004 

6% 

100.915 

— 

Beoffared at 9929. NonooOafahL Fees 2% (CS first Boston} 

Rothschild 

Gxitinuation finance 

El 25 

perpt 

9 

99 389 

— 

GoAcbie From 2004 06 per. Fees 075%. (Hoara Govett J 

Bayerische 

Landesbank 

ff 500 

2002 

zero 

100 


. blue vrifl be split into a zero bond and a bond paying 7K%. 
Redeemable from 1995. Redenmiian mount at maturity vai 
bn Snlasd to the performance of toe CAC 40 stodi index. Fees 
not dadased. [Ccxsse des Depots et ConsignorionsJ 

Cause Centrale de 
Credit Immabifier 

DSL finance 

Aegon 

FF 2,000 

ff 1,500 

DF250 

2002 

2004 

1999 

6 

5% 

5Vfc 

9 7.92 

98.67 

10016 

- 

Nancdtable. Fees 0J5X. (Come des Dbpdts et Gxasgna- 
■fotta} 

— 

Reoffered at99W- Nonadable. Fees 1%. (ABNAnva] 

Austria 

DF 1,000 

2024 

6V5 

9&ra 

— 

Beo/fered at 9&.15. NonooSable. fees 1%. (ABN-Amro BanicJ 

De Nationale 
Investeringsbank 

OF 500 

2000 

516 

100.17 


Reaffered at 99+2. NanaaMtia. Fees 1%. (ING BanlcJ 

LKB Baden- 

Wuerttemberg 

finance 

in 300,000 

2004 

7JBQ 

101V 


NonooBohle. Fees 2% (Gedbo haKano.) 

Suedwest LB Capital 
Markets 

m.1 50,000 

2004 

6 

101 80 

, — 

Nancofafaie. Fees 2%. (Banco di Roma] 

Eksportfinans 

sk 1,500 

2004 

6% 

99796 

— 

Nonadtable. Fees 0875%. (Ssdomon Brothers Int'IJ 

Norcfic Investment 
Bank 

SK1400 

1999 

616 

99A16 

— 

NanoaMila. Fees 0375%. (MerrB Lynch Inti] 

Abbey National 
Treasury Services 

◦ 200 

2004 

616 

101 .355 

— 

Reofforad ot 99 J05. Noncdlobto. Fans 2%. (Solomon Brothers 
Inti} 

Helaba finance 

a200 

2004 

616 

100.445 

— 

Reoffered iri 98 77. Nonooiloble. Fees 2% (Domra EuropeJ 

Ontario 

◦ 1^50 

2024 

716 

98^2 

— 

5efnionnuoly. NonoaRoUa. Fees 0AS% (Gofctaan Sachs Irt'IJ 

News America 
Holdings 

AibSISO 

2014 

8M 

100 

— 

Semiannually. NanodUtle private plaoement. Fees not db- 
dosed. IMerrfl Lynch IntlJ 

Treasury Carp, of 
Victoria 

a«4200 

2002 


lOl.ifl 

— 

Reoffered at 9983. NoncakUe. Foes 1%%- (Swiss Bari 

CorpJ 

Equity-Linked 

Industrial Credit & 
Investment Corp. of 
Indio 

$175 

2000 

open 

100 


Coupon indknled or W to 314%. NonaAable. ComertUe at 
an expected 13 to 18% premium. Fees 2%%. Terms to be set 
Feb. 4. pj*. Morgan SeaxiiiesJ 

Itochu Fuel 

$150 

1998 

m 

100 

— 

Nonadabie. Each $10,000 note with tvra wtrrrerfi eeards- 
abte >*> company's shares at on expected 2M% premium. 
Fees 254%. Term to be set Feb. 1. (NBcko Europe.) 

Kissei Pharmaceutical 
Co. 

$100 

1998 

1% 

100 

— 

NaicuBubte. Each $5,000 note with one warfare exerdsabie 
into comparry'i shores at 5,935 yen per shore ond ot 11320 
yen per dolor. Fees 216%. (Dahra EunopeJ 

Paul Y-ITC 

Constructions Holding 

SI 00 

2001 

5 

100 

— 

Noncolabie. Convertible re HKJ2.90 per stare and at 
HKS7723 per doBw. Fees 2 W% (Peregreie CaprtcL) 

PIV Investment 

Finance 

$200 

2000 

AY, 

100 

— 

Semionnuofly. CtJaHe re par (ram 1997. Convertible re 
HKS24 per shtm and at FM77235 per dote. Foes W% 
(Morgan Stanley toil) 

Tanayong Public 
Company 

$125 

2004 

open 

100 

— 

Coupon indcoted at 3H to 4%. Redeemable m 1999 to yield 1 
to 2 aver Treasuries. Convertible at an expected 10 to 15% 
prermum. Feas 2K%. Terms to be set Feb. Z (Swiss Bank CorpJ 

United Engineers 

$200 

2004 

open 

100 


Sensannual coupon indented at 2 to 2V>%. Redeemable m 199 
to yield 5.04%. Convertible at on ejected 15 to 18% 
premejm. Fees 2V4%. Terms to be let Jan. 31. (Morgan Stanley 
Inti.) 

Danisco 

OK 1,000 

2004 

5 

100 


Noncdfoble. Convertible at 1280 kronor per share, a 20% 
premise. Fees 2M%. (5-G Warburg 5ecuriM&J 


Aluminum 

Producers 

AcceptCuts 

Complied by Our Staff From Dispatchai 

BRUSSELS —The world's major 

aluminum producing nations have 
agreed on a plan to trim a glut of the 
metal on world markets, the Euro- 
pean Commission said Sunday. 

The plan is likely to lead Ida cut 
in world production of about 10 
percent, or between 1 5 million and 
10 million metric tons, said Peter 
Guilford, spokesman for the Euro- 
pean Union's trade commissioner, 
Sir Leon Brittan. Western industry 
had been seeking cuts of this mag- 
nitude. 

The agreement was formulated 
during negotiations earlier this 
month involving the United States, 
Russia, Australia, Canada, Nor- 
way, and the European Union. The 
commission said all parties had ac- 
cepted a memorandum of under- 
standing arising out of the talks. 

A surge in al uminum exports 
from Russia has led to a 40 percent 
drop in al uminum prices, analysts 
said The collapse the arms indus- 
tries in the former Soviet republics 
forced producers to seek markers 
abroad 

“Under the EU plan, Russia has 
agreed to restructure its aluminum 
industry and other countries ex- 
pressed willingness to help the Rus- 
sians do so,” Mr. Guilford said. 
The EU, he said, will help pay some 
of the costs of cutting Russian pro- 
duction. 

Russia has agreed to slash its 
production by 500,000 tons and 
companies in the (Mho 1 major pro- 
ducing countries will make their 
own decisions about how much 
output they will cot, Mr. Guilford 
said. 

Mr. Guilford said companies 
will want to reduce output as “it’s 
in everyone’s interest to cut back" 
in order to stabilize prices. 

Aluminum Co. of America and 
Alcan Aluminum Ltd of Canada, 
two of the world’s largest alumi- 
num producers, blame the surge in 


Long-Term Treasuries 


. NEW YORK — Long-term bonds are reap- 
ing the benefits of quiescent U.S. inflation, 
although shorter-term issues are lagging be-' 
cause of concern that the Federal Reserve 
Board eventually will push up interest rates. - 

Although the bellwether 30-year Treasury 
bond finished Friday at a yield of 6.2! percent, 
down from 628 percent a week earlier and the 
lowest close in five weeks, there was concern 
about the Fed's intentions. The magazine Busi- 
ness Week, in an issue that reached subscribers 
Friday, quoted a central-bank source as saying 
that some members of the Federal Open Mar- 
ket Committee were becoming concerned about 
the Fed's inaction. 

The report said the FOMC, the central 
bank's policy-making body, might consider 
pushing up tbe federal funds rate on overnight 
Interbank loans to 325 percent as early as this 
week. Fed funds have traded at about 3 percent 
since September 1992. 

With these fears of a short-term rate rise; the 


three-year Ifcasuzy note ended tire week un- 
changed, yielding 436 percent. -'••• 

- Some analysts quesuftofed whether the kmg- : 
term-bond rally had gone too fatand said data 
due this week might indicate an economy too 
strong lo sustain such low interest rate. The 

US€REDrrMARKETS^^ -"""y 

market was not swayed by the , Friday report 
from the Commerce Department that gros 
domestic product grew 53 percent in the fourth 
quarter, (he fastest ptfce in sue years. 

One reason for the lack of concern about 
inflation was that the report said the Commerce 
Department’s broadest measure of inflation, 
the GDP deflator, rose just 1 3 percent in the 
fourth quarter, down from 1.6 perpent'm the 
third and die smallest quarterly increase in 
more than 25 ycanL 

. Astimigthenmgecmion^oftfinbTLQas mfla- 

tion. But txnd investors are betting mat the 
current growth translate into rising prices. 
“While it is rartirely likdy that the rare of 


growth wffl slow; it is undear given thfr jjoou. 
data that the -economy will comply with ttre i 

"hopes of the investor base,” cautioned "nwraas 
Sowanick, chief fixed-income strategist at Mer- 

• rill Lyndi & Co: 

. Mr. 'Sowanick took a critical vtopof JJ* 
■“wonderful world of economic nowth-wrihout 
inflation, declining federal deflate, nc *~ 
zero privatemSgrowth," that US. financial 
markets seem to currently share. 

. Two reports tikdy to affect the credit narket 

this week are tbe National Asso<MbOTortff- 

Januaiy-toe^Say, and the US. rrada™ 
payrolls for January, to be released cm Frday. 

“People right now are expecting a reawwoly 
solid economy and slow reflation, salt t-u* 1 

• Hoffingsworth, who manages S3 billion h Eri v_ 
ernmem bond funds at Fidelity lnveseneats, 
the nation’s hugest n n |T,|<t i fund companj. ™ e 

think inflations going te be around 2 ptraoL 

That’s why we’re still fairly bullish. " 

(Bloomberg, Knight-Rub r) 


The Week Ahead! World Economic Calendar, Jan. 31- Feb. 5 


A schedule of Ms week s economic ana 
Bnandal events, oompBed tor the Interne- 
HonolHeraU Tribune by OoonbetgBu»- 
ness News. 

A ri u-PudWc 

• Jem. 31 Botjog Amgen Inc., wodd 
leader m btowetanotagy lor medical wat- 
mant, opens ofttaa in Beijing. 

U eflng J. P. Morgan a Co, 'a chairman, 
Dermis Weatheratone.'opens representa- 
tive atfloe hero 



it in the fourth quarter of 1993. 

The European Commission said 
the United Slates was reviewing 
“legal requirements" relating to the 
memorandum, an apparent refer- 
ence to Washington’s concern 
about infringing on its anti-trust 
laws. 

Aluminum pries had risen to a 
six-month high on Friday in antici- 
pation of (he agreement. 

The aluminum producers will 
meet again in Canada on Feb. 28 to 
review the market situation. 

(Reuters. Bloomberg, AFP) 


Iran Oil Sales 
Fell Sharply in 
Last 10 Months 

Agence Froncc-Prasc 

TEHRAN — Iranian aQ ex- 
port revenues during the last 
1 0-month period were 20 per- 
cent below government projec- 
tions, Oil Mini ster Gbolamreza 
Aqazadeh was quoted as saying 
in newspaper reports Sunday. 

Mr. Aghazadeh said crude 
sales amounted to $11.4 bil- 
lion during the period from 
March 20 to Jan. 20, or 52j} 
billion less than expected. 

Iran had expected to earn 
$17 billion from oQ exports for 
the full year ending this 
March, but several Western 
energy specialists here said the 
country’s oil sales probably 
would not exceed $13 billion. 

The specialists said Iran had 
been forced to sell every bane! 
of crude for less than $10, 
compared withS16.5set outin 
in the budget. 

Mr. Aqazadeh said produc- 
tion capacity bad been raised to 
42 million barrels per day. 


Hang Kong Texas instruments Asia 
holds press briefttg on atrategiaa tor ttw 
Asia-Pacific etoctrorecs ana aamlconduo- 
tor braSness. 

Tokyo Qovammenl to convene ordinary 
partamentary session. 

Tokyo Dtosmtwr housing starts and 
construction ortara. 

Earnings mpeetad IHD HokSnga, Kano 
Fong Sin Ksa Construction. KoaonJc in- 
ternational Holdings, Manhattan cud 
Co.. Son IMguel Brewery. Shun Ctaong 
Holdings, Stetux Holdings. 

• M, 1 Kong Kong First issue of 
Eastern Express, Hong Kong’s third Eng- 
isManguage dtely. 

Tokyo OetOber-to-Decomber affloa oc- 
cupancy ratio and office rent figures. 
WaMngton. Hew Zealand Thkd-querter 
gross domestic product 

• Fetal Hong Kong Stress In printed 
circuit board and laminates maker Nam 
Hing Holdings begin trading on Hong 
Kong Stock Exchange following its Initial 
pubBc offering of stuns. 

Tokyo Japan vice ministerial-level gen- 
eral meeting. Through Fats. 5. 


We llin g t on December new housing 
units estimate. • 

Europw , , ' . 

Enrarfisit Me week. Frankfort Da- 

camper M-3 money supply tram fourth 
quarter base. Forecast Up 72. percent - 
■Bedr i d December trade balance. Fore- 
cast: 1845 Minor peseta deficit 
Man Jamnsy consumer price Index. 
Forecast: Up 42 percent 
Frenkkat December Industrial produc- 
tion. Forecast: Up 72 percent 
Frankfurt Daeembre manufacturing oui- 
put Forecast Up 05 percent 
Brussels January unemployment rate. 
Forecast 142 -percent 
Copen ha gen December unemployment 
rate. Forecast 125 percent. ■ 

Frankfurt December manufacturing or- 
ders. Forecast Up 02 percent . 

S Jan. 31- Au i sUm B — 1893 retail 
sales. 

London January M-0 money supply pro- 
visional. Forecast Up 0.7 percent in 
month. up 55 percent In year. 

Paris January survey of buatoeas. 

Paris December unemployment . rate. 
Fore cast 111 percent 
e Feb. 1 A f i M ll M 1993 housing 
construction statistics, 
e Feb. 2 Bnassts Weekly meeting of 
the European Commission. 

B r us sels January unemployment data. 
London January official reserves. Fore- 
cast £77.5 mMkxt 

• Mb 3 Araotardam October car 
sales. 

Frankest BundasMnkcauncfl. meeting. 

• Fata A London December Ml rrion- 
etary ststadcs. (nchnfing bank and bufid- 
mg society balance sheets. 


TbeAnwricat 

e Jan. 31 WasNaglM Fareonsl In- 
come and spanefing tor December. 

New York Rival lander otfara from Via- 
com lnc. and OVC Network Inc. lor SO.l 
percent or Pansnount Communications 
Inc. stock expire at mMnigM EOT. 
Houstoa Continental AMnas expected 
to armounoa expenPon or the ksv-tsie, 
Short-haul service it initiated lest October. 
Lima Peru receives bids tor 1B.S pet- 


ceht tor Comperta Peruana de TeMNcno8 
and 35 percent o( Empresa Nockxta de 
Teiecomunicacianes. 

Sndago Chiles stae-omted Corpora- 
BhOri de Fbmento de le R r bduooWn ssHs - 
Ihe xinc producer Empresa lAnera Aysen. 
Outtook:. Corlo expects to receive S40 
mBlon lor the company. 

QSssi Noverobor rest groee domestic 
product at lector 008t by mrfustiy report 
Dntrok oanM R. Smith, chairman ot 
First of America and heed of the American 
Bankers Association, io address the Eco- 
nomic Club ot Detroit on future ot banfc- 
mg. 

Enfcm* rep e O s tf Allegheny Lufflum 
Conv. BCE Mobile CommuniCMfORs lnc.. 
Central. Maine Power Co.. Consol Idatad 
Frnig/ttw8y8 Corp.. Wpsco Industries, 
FTovera Foods^ Spring induSWaa, Stern 
ley Works. Sterling S oftwa re Infc, Unocal 
Cvp- Upjohn Co. Wheellng-PRtsburgh 
Corp.. Wm. W rig toy Jr. Cow Xerox Corp-. 
Corp. 

• Fetal TsafMkAitnBa NePcmalAa- 
sodation ot Purchasing Management re- 
leases index tor January. 

New York DeadDne for final DWa tor Pw^ 
amount 

Washington National. Association of 
Realtors reports Its fourth quarter hous- 
tog aftordaMty Index. 

Wash in gton Constr uc tion spending tor 
December. 

-Irvine, CatOornia ICN Pharmacauttoats 

lnc- annual aharehbldere meet ing , ihciud- 
tog rote on stoekbrakv Rail Khan'a bid to 
unseat Chatonan hitUm Panic end Incum- 
bent slate ot directors. 

Lee Angeles Encore Medle Corp. 
launches first nesi premium cable asrvioe 
in more then a decade. 

Now York Piper Jeffrey opens two-day 
conference wtih presentations by Settled 
Uls Systems. -Medtronic, Heart Technol- 
ogy and 26 other companies that make 
eardtarascuiaf-reSatad products. 
W as h ing t o n American Petroleum mstt- 
tute -issues weekly report on U.S. petre- 
toum stacks, produetton, tmporta and re- 

finwy utlEzotlon. 

Esmkigs rxpedtd American General 
Corp* Btockbuster Entertain merit. East- 
man Kodak Col, Johnson & Johnson. 
Knlght-Rlddar, PepsiCo Inc-, Polaroid 
Conk. Reebok toto m a t tons l Lid.. Ten- 
neco lnc.. U5- Surgical Corp. 


SINGAPORE! Investing Abroad. 


Coafinoed from Pfcge 7 

weO to such countries as Chinn, 
Indonesia, Malaysia, tbe Philip- 
pines and Thailand, where its in- 
vestments already are substantial. 

Singapore's state-owned DBS 
Bank has been granted approval hy 
Indian authorities to set up a 
branch office in Bombay, said Pat- 
rick Ycob, the bank's president. 

Under a deregulation program 
started in 1991, India recently de- 
cided to partly privatize banks and 
allow foreign and local private 
banks to operate for the find time 
since the banking sector was na- 
tionalized in 1969. 

Singapore, where labor costs are 
steadily rising, wants to tap India’s 
economic growth, low-cost labor, 
and tiie purchasing power of its 
middle-class, which some analysis 
say numbers 200 million. 

Until the new branch office 
opens later this year, DBS will have 
a representative office in Bombay, 
India’s main business and fi nancia l 
center. 

Mr. Yeoh said that with a pres- 
ence in Bombay, DBS would be 
better placed to finance increasing 
trade flows between India and Sin- 
gapore and introduce Indian com- 
panies to the Singapore capital 


market to take advantage of the 
many financial products and ser- 
vices there. 

Bilateral trade between tbe two 
countries amounted to more than 
$1J billion in 1993. 

On Friday in Bangalore, India, 
Mr. Goh launched Singapore’s 
largest project in that oountry, a 58- 
acre (23-bectare) information-tech- 
nology industrial park scheduled to 
open in 1995. 

Hie project is a joint venture 
between the Tata group, one of 
India's largest industrial conglom- 
erates, the Karnataka state govern- 
ment, and a consortium of private 
and government-linked Singapore 
companies. Tata has a 40 percent 
equity, Karnataka 20 permit and 
the Singapore consortium 40 per- 
cent 

Often called tbe Silicon Valley of 
India, Bangalore has attracted 
many in formation- technology 
companies and professionals. 

Liew Mim Leong, managing di- 
rector of L&M group, a member of 
the Singapore consortium, said that 
the new park would accommodate 
about 16,000 people and provide 
facilities of international standard. 


BONDS: The Dollar Paper dune B fllladiir Unveils Economic Stimulus Package 


Continued from Page 7 

traders said investors responded 
enthusiastically to a traditional 
floating-rate note providing a high- 
er return. 

The main feature this week will 
be China's S 1 billion global bond of 
10-year fixed-coupon paper. Road 
show’s in the major markets have 
bull tremendous demand for the 
issue, which is expected to be 
priced to yield around 85 basis 
points more than U.S. government 
paper, and some increase, possibly 
to S 1.25 billion is likely. 

Portugal, an infrequent borrow- 
er. also intends to raise up to SI 
billion, but it is unclear whether 
this will be part of a global bond’ 
offering or a domestic issue in the 
UJS. market. 

This week, Portugal is expected 
to tap the international market for 
a global issue of 750 million Euro- 
pean Currency Units ($839 mil- 
lion) of 10-year bonds. Talk in the 
market is that the paper will be 
priced to yield 30 basis points over 
the benchmark French government 
Ecu paper, which currently returns 
5.97 percent. 


While the German market per- 
formed badly this month — yields 
backed up about 17 basis points, 
making government bunds one of 
the four worst performing markets 
in the J. P. Morgan calculations — 
analysts are beginning to tout tbe 
Deutsche mark sector. The com- 
pression of yields in other Europe- 
an markets toward German levels 
has gone about as far os can be 
expected to go in the nearterm. and 
analysis are now looking for some 
improved performance in the mark 
sector. 

Yields on 10-year mark paper 
are now three basis points below 
French levels {compared with four 
basis over the French at the start of 
the year) and 209 basis points over 
Spanish levels f241 at the beginning 
of the year). 

“Wc expect stabilization of 
spreads over the German market 
now," said Banque Indosuez. It 
predicted strengthening of the 
mark against European currencies 
fueling expectations of a further 
cut in German interest rates. But 
with the timing uncertain of the 
next German reduction, it advises 
buying short-dated mark paper. 


Compiled hr Our Staff From Dispatches 

PARIS — Prime Minister 
Edouard Bahadur unveiled mea- 
sures Sunday to hdp stimulate the 
economy, and said be was standing 
by a growth forecast of 1.4 percent 
for this year. 

Mr. Ball ad or spelled out some of 
the new measures after a govern- 
ment seminar on the economy. 

These also included a decision to 
partly unblock money tied up in 
employee profit-sharing plans. By 
some accounts freeing up the mon- 
ey in these Hinds could boost con- 
sumer spending considerably. Mr. 
Bahadur said & money could be 
removed from the plans if it was 
used to buy cars or to do housing- 
related projects. 

He also announced initiatives to 
encourage the creation of low-pay 


service-sector jobs, extend existing 
training and youth employment 
programs, and trim spending in the 
public health services. 

He said the cost of tbe new mea- 
sures was “not considerable” and 
that the their effect on the budget 
ought to offset by the improved tax 
returns that would follow stronger 
economic growth. 

Mr. Bahadur said that gross do- 
mestic product shrank by about 0.8 

K t last year, tbe figure used 
1994 budget Ministers had 
been saying the shrinkage may 
have been only 0.7 percent. 

The government also plans to 
speed up a program of refunding 
value-added tax to companies for 
those which lake on new workers, 
especially young apprentices and 
other trainees, he said. 


■ Care for EU Air lodustry? 

A panel charged with finding a 
cure for the ills of the Euimean 
airline industry will prescribe a 
mixture of competition and a tough 
policy on state aid when it reports 
its findings Tuesday, Reuters re- 
ported from Brussels. 

The panel, which comprises a 
group of key executives in the trav- 
el and tourism world, were asked 
last year by the European Union to 
cone up with ways to help an in- 
dustry that bad losses of 522 tril- 
lion in 1992. 

Their task has been made more 
difficult by the deep divisions with- 
in the industry over what measures 
were needed to revive the sector. 

In the end, air transport sources 
say, the panel has come down oa 


the side of continuing a policy of 
open competition. 

They said the panel would urge a 
tough policy on state aklto airlines, 
many of which are government- 
owned, arguing it should be grant- 
ed only in limited circumstances. 

The panel apparently has reject- 
ed daixns by state-owned carriers 
that tbey merit large iq'ections of 
state aid because they race a cost 
disadvantage compared with big- 
ger carriers. 

EU transport ministers will give 
the ideas, which win not be trad- 
ing, a first airing at an informal 
meeting in Athens on Feb. 7. 

In another development, KLM 
Royal Dutch Airlines' pilots union 
said it was conadeaing a slowdown, 
and possibly a strike. 


GERMANY: Metal J Yorkers Strike at a Risky Time 


Last Week’s Markets 


Swiss Jobs Outlook Darkens 

Bloomberg Busmen Mews 

DAVOS, Switzerland — Unemployment in Switzerland will not de- 
cline until 1996, Economics Minister Jean-Pascal Defamuraz said on 
Sunday, contradicting statements made earlier this month by government 
officials and the Swiss National Bank. 

The current unemployment rate now stands at 5.1 percent. Mr. 
Ddamurtt said, “All this year, unemployment wilt stay at this level, if not 
get worse, and that applies also to next year.” He added that even 
relatively low interest rales and inflation would not alleviate the jobless 
total in the near future. 


Continued from Plage 7 
dement of flexibility in Germany's 
rigid nationwide collective bargain- 
ing agreements, while the union 
seeks an end to the massive layoffs 
that are fueling record unemploy- 
ment and whittling away at its 
membership. 

Mr. Ost died a confidential fore- 
cast that 1 million to 2 million 
workers in German industry risk 
losing their jobs this year. More 
tiian 4 million people are already 
jobless or underemployed. 

Metals-industry employers 
sought to undertine the urgency of 
their situation last November by 
abrogating an existing contract for 
the first lime ever, putting 1G Me- 


talL the big metalworkers union, on 
the defensive. Employers called 
their unprecedented move as a “cry 
for help in a crisis,” but the union 
described it as “a declaration of 
war." 

1G Metall, whose 3 2 million 
members possess the power to 
bring German manufacturing to a 
standstill scheduled work stop- 
pages and walkouts involving hun- 
dreds of thousands of disgruntled 
workers starting this week after a 
grace period on disruptions expired 
and initial talks ended without re- 
sult 

Mercedes-Benz AG. ooe of Ger- 
many’s biggest automotive and 
truck manufacturers, was sched- 


uled to be the target of another 
action Monday. 

The union, which paralyzed Ger- 
man industry 10 years ago with a 
two-month strike, threatens to 
spread the walkouts and eventually 
rail a strike if its demands are not 
meL 

“IG Metall is digging its own 
grave if it pushes forward to an 
industrial battle," said Dieter 
Kirchner, chief executive of thcGe- 
samtmetall employer's federation. 

Many companies would opt our 
of the nationwide collective bar- 
gaining process and seek accords 
with their employees locally before 
becoming hostage to an impasse. 


AO ftgurea an as of dam of trading Friday 

Stock Indexes 

United StatM Jon. 20 Jon. 21 ate 
DJ Indus. XMS43 +U7% 

DJ UHL 22542 7>9J5 +258% 

OJ Trans. 1,81459 1AU2B +1.12% 

S&P100 *077 +051% 

5 & P 500 47070 47472 +OS4* 

S&PInd 55450 5S3JB +027% 

NYSE Cp 26542 26112 + 087% 

Britain 

FTSE 100 144740 348420 —106% 

FT 30 10930 246&50 — 1jW% 

Jawa 

Nikkei 225 1&759. 19007. —284% 


Money Rates 

UBHsdggg 
Discount rote 
Prime rote 
Federal funds rale 
Japan 
Dtscuum 
Cnti money 
JnTtorttti IrttertXJrtk 


19007. —284% 


PAX 2.13347 207541 +279% 

Hone Kane 

Hons Sons 1127780 11A9UB— ~QJ1% 

Wteld 

MSCtP 6U.90 61640 +041% 

Warns index From Atoivat) SUMey promi Inn 


Jan. 28 Jan. 7! 
100 300 

680 ADD 

380 213/16 

lVr . 1% 

33/16 23/16 

2Vh 21/16 


Lomoard - 6% 6to 

am money 6 36 60S 

3-monffi Interne* SM US 

Britain 

Bank ban rate 5V? Sto 

Coll money. • 5 Vs 54k 

3-monto Interbank 57/16 57/16 

6oM Jtxv'26 Jan. 21 Otoe 

London R4TLftxS37US 38680 —281% 


• lataa WaaMagton Oecorrberiead 

ing Indicators. [ 

Washington December new hom4 
sales. l 

' Mexico C#f Central bank (pwounctri 
results of weekly auction erf oowemmenl 
securities. Oufioofc SHon-urm Troesum 
biiia to drop *oaii0.4a percent i 

tentage January Wlaiton. OuSook: Up 8 
0.9 per cent 1 

Now York USX Cop. expected to 
4.5 mtton shares of its U S. Steel Group | 
at 541 a snare through Morgan Stanly S 
Co. 

Chicago Mazda. Mitsubishi, lauzu and 
GU% Quick (Melon hold press confer- 
ancea In advanc e of the Chicago Auto 
Show that rune from Feb. 5-13. 

Earnings expected: Avon Products, Con- 
Hoi' Data Systems lnc, McGraw HiB, Pactt- 
tc Enterprises, Readers Digest Associa- 
tion. Rylsnd Group lnc., Spaghetti 
Warehouse, Sprint Corp-, U8G&F Corp- 

• Feta 3 Waaftfagtan Initial weakly 
state unemployment co mp en sa tion mflur- 
ancactafans. 

Washington December factory orders. 
Detail Tap automakers to report U-S 
sales of new care and trtrcka tor January. 
Busnoa Abes January inflation. Out- 
look: Up 03 percent 
C h icago Porsche. Toyota! Honda and 
Ford hold press conferences to advance 
of Chicago Auto Show. Ford expected to 
unvefl new leasing plan lor md vehtdes 
Earnfnga expected Canadian Hre 
Corp, CdgtoofalmoBvo. Coming lnc.. 
Dexter Corp-, 9 UBy 8 Co.. General in- 
strument, General Signal. ITT Corp.. JeV 
. toraon-PBrt Corp., Pttney Bowes lnc„ Bo- 
ston Purina Co, Reliance Electric Co. 
Rubbermaid too. Snap-On Toots Coax, 
Textron lnc.. Times Mkrar Cp. 

■ Rata 4 W aahto gtoo January unem- 
ployment 

Washington ■ Federal Reserve System 
reports on commercial and Industrial toan 
activity.. 

Chicago Chrysler. Subaru and Genarr 
Motors' Pontiac, Chevrolet, OktanobV 
and Cadillac divtaiora hold proas conic 
ences for Chicago Auto Show. 

Eanringa expected American watt 
Works. Convex Computer Corp , Penol 
scot 8hoe. Shaffer Components. 


INDIA: 

Faster Change 

Contf»Hed from Page? 
and India’s capability to tackle 
them,” Mr. Singh said He added, 
“We do need much higher growth 
rates. We need 6 to 7 percent.” 

“I know of no country winch in 
the first two years of the program 
of a^'astmmt-cuni-siracmrar re- 
forms managed to achieve those 
sort of growth rates.” he said. . 

Although he was not implicated 
in the affair, in late December Mr. 
Siogh offered his resignation as fi- 
nance minister to take responsibil- 
ity for a massive stock market scan- 
dal centered on n Bombay. 

Mr. Rao, encouraged by a dis- 
play of widespread public support 
from tbe local and international 
business. community for Mr. Singh 
and his policies, rejected the offer 
to step down after several days of 
national debate. 

“They needed him then,” said 
Australia's high comnrisrioner to 
India, David Evans. “And they 
need him now.” 

Meantime, India is looking 
abroad. 

“Our future is East more than 
West,” Mr. Singh said. “We would 
like to retain oar links with our 
traditional partners. But Asia to- 
day is the center of economic activ- 
ity and we would like to be a part- 
ner in that process.” 

Still, East Asia's most dynamic 
economic success story, China, is 
not Mr. Singh's idea of a blueprint. 

“Much as I admire the Chinese 
achievements, we cannot go the 
Chinese way,” he sakL 

The finance minister also spoke 
of India's “advantages” in the long- 
er term, notably its strong econom- 
ic institutions, its legal system de- 
rived from British law and its 
functioning market economy. 

“We have also a constitution and 
government committed to the rule 
of law and an open society in which 
our weaknesses are as viable as oar 
strengths,” Mr. Singh said. 

■ Airline Rnles Are Relaxed 

Sunday newspaper reports said 
that India has changed regulations 
to permit its state-owned domestic 
and international airlines to be- 
come publicly held companies. 


.Source; Eurvdcar. Cette i. 

Libor Rates 


U*J 3N 

Daotsctaiearx 4 in A 
PnMtMn 57/16 
Praocx Irene 
ECU 6% 

y* . 


micwlh tin 

Tk V 

SH/H 5 116 

57 n* sii 

6 S/16 t 

6H L 

2JV 


Sourt»; Ltovtfc Bank, RMera. 


Italy Sets 
Price of 33^ 
IMI Offering 

CompfkJ by Ov Stuff From Dispatch 

MILAN — The Italian govro- 
ment said it would sell a 33 perent 
stake in Jsiituto Mobitiarc Italino 
SpA on Monday at 10,900 ire 
($6.40) a share. 

The government had aheadytid 
it would sell 200 million share or 
33 percent of the bank's tquirvvnd 
that tbe price would be baeen 
9,800 and 11,000 lire a shan It 
waited until just before the saloe- 
gan to announce the exact prio 

The sale begins Monday and tds 
Friday, though it could be died 
early if there is adequate demamln 
December, tbe government eked 
tbe sale of its stake in Credito'a- 
liano SpA two days early becau it 
was six times oversubscribed. 

“Demand for the shares isot 
only strong, it is also of excelnt 
quality,' said the Treasury's dic- 
tor-general Mario DraghL 

IMI is being divided into W 
millio n shares. With net share bri- 
er equity of 6.963 trillion lire aof 
SepL 30, the equity per-shartis 
11,605 lire, more than 6 perat 
above the purchase price. 

Based on IMI’s earnings of *1 
billion lire ($265 million) in 19^ 
the price works out to 752 lira 
share, meaning that the sale price 
14.5 times 1992 earnings. 

(Bloomberg, Reutei 

Euromarts 
A* a Glance 

Eurobond Yields 


Jan.aLkm.71 

YrMeb 

Yrlo 

US 

ATI 

646 

625 

5JS0 

LSI 

549 

US 

4.91 

wn 

ill 

610 

ssr 

634 

61 * 

62* 

S.91 

521 

SL93 

U7 

781 

753 

112 

7.91 

621 

629 

637 

620 : 

1M 

7.17 

7.17 

7» 

625 

6 W 

62! 

6 U 1 

iff 

SB 

£6* 

5J1 i 

6J1 

655 

,67: 

631 1 

648 

64* 

671 

66 * 1 

627 

606 

4> 

SW I 

110 

ZJM 

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Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 1994 


Russia Outlook: Hyperinflation, Falling Output and Reform Paralysis 

v X L/ A m the same Q 1 



By Alan Friedman 
and Jonathan Cage 

inlernatmtwi Hav/d Tribune 

DAVOS, Switzerland — Russia 
is beaded for a year of hyperinfla- 
tion. declining industrial produc- 
tion and paralysis of reform efforts, 
leading Russian politicians and 
Western economists said here this 
weekend. 


a very unstable president.” Mr. 
Yavlinsky's reference to President 
Boris N. Yeltsin was as far as any 
Russian would go on the record in 
describing what others in private 
depicted as Mr. Yeltsin’s depressed 
and withdrawn mood. 


“the odds are 75 percent that things 
will go the wrong way." 

What i' 


Apprehension and alarm about 
SUp 


The economic crisis will proba- 
bly be made worse by a lack erf 
political will on the part of Prune 
Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin 
to take necessary but harsh mea- 
sures, said Boris G. Fyodorov, who 
resigned as Russia's finance minis- 
ter last week. Mr. Fyodorov made 
his remarks during a roundtable on 
the future of the Russian economy 
sponsored by the International 
Herald Tribune and the World 
Economic Forum. 


the suppery slope on which Rus- 
sians find themselves were evident 
at the roundtable, which brought 
together Mr. Fyodorov. Anders As- 
lund, who resigned recently as an 

adviser to the Russian government, 
and Arkadi I. Volsky, president of 
the Russian Industrialists' and En- 
trepreneurs’ Association. 


Sunday night. Mr. Chernomyr- 
din dismissed critics of his govern- 
ment and in a message designed to 
reassure Western diplomats and 
business executives, said be was 
certain that those who doubted 
Russia would succeed with reform 
“would be put to sham e " 

But Grigori A. Yavlinsky, the 
radical reform politician who is 
among the fresh-faced victors of 
last December's parliamentary 
election, said earlier: “We have no 
government, no plans, no ideas and 


The discussion underscored po- 
litical and generational differences 
in how to approach economic re- 
form, with Mr. Fyodorov and Mr. 
Aslund malting dire forecasts and 
Mr. Volsky resisting the harsh mea- 
sures that Western economists say 
are needed if Moscow is proceed on 
the road to a market economy. 

The one thing all three roundta- 
ble participants agreed upon was 
that, irrespective of Mr. Cherno- 
myrdin's promises, his government 
was not tnily committed to reform, 
and was unlikely to proride much 
in the way of economic leadership. 

Mr. Fyodorov said baldly that he 
expected “a far more populist, less 
well-thought-out way of managing 
the economy." He predicted that 


that implied, said the Rus- 
sian politician, who has won plau- 
dits from the Clinton administra- 
tion and the International 
Monetary Fund for his dedication 
to reform, was that by the middle 
of 1594 the monthly inflation rate 
could leap to 35 percent from an 
estimated 12 to 15 percent al the 
end of 1993. 

Real income will fall, there will 
be no growth in industrial produc- 
tion and the budget deficit in the 
first quarter of 1 994 will amount to 
15 trillion rubles (currently SI 1.1 
billion), or twice the level con- 
tained in budgetary planning just a 
few weeks ago, Mr. Fyodorov pre- 
dicted. 

While Mr. Aslund agreed with 
Mr. Fyodorov, warning that “the 
people who remain in government 
are the most conservative," Mr. 
Volsky argued that there was too 
much hysteria about the Russian 
economy in the Western media. 

Turning to industrial issues. Mr. 
Fyodorov insisted on the need for 
the radical restructuring of Russian 
companies. “It is obvious that there 
is now no industrial policy to speak 
of, that there should be massive 
closures with heavy reductions in 
the number of workers, and that we 
need to be much tougher on ineffi- 
cient industries," he said. 

Mr. Fyodorov added that as long 


Yavlinsky and Fyodorov 
Talk Over Joining Forces 


Intemab&iai Herald Tnbunc 


DAVOS. Switzerland — In a bid to piece together the divided 
Russian reform movement. Grigori A. Yavlinsky, the aewjy elected 
leader of the Yabloko bloc in & Russian parliament, and Boris G. 
Fyodorov, wfao quit in protest last week as finance minister of the 


Russian government, are discussing joining forces, the two men said. 
Mr. Yavlinsky said: “We are talking about him joining my patty. 


For me it would be a very big privilege if Boris would join my party. 
We're looking for a strategy of how to do that." He predicted the two 
would reach a solution “very soon." 

Mr. Fyodorov said: “He made me an offer. 1 said I would think 
about it." The two went into a private huddle during a break in the 
World Economic Forum meetings here. 

1ft... ti- vz “ j .i _ . , 


But Mr. Yavlinsky said that, despite the closeness of their ideas 
anal fri« 


and their personal friendship, “It’s not so easy" for his party to 
embrace a man wfao “came from a government that brought 30 
percent inflation a month and a 52 percent decline in production.” 

It would be necessary to wait for a while before reformers could 
hope to return to power, be concluded. 


as Russia’s central bank handed 
out subsidized loans to industry on 
a preferential basts, inflation would 
continue to spiral out of control 
and industry would never become 
competitive or even more produc- 
tive. As an example he complained 
of how it took months last year to 
persuade Viktor V. Gerashchenko, 
the Russian central bank governor, 
to raise the discount rate from 80 


percent to 210 percent, a level that 
was stiD too low. 

Mr. Volsky, a proponent of grad- 
ual reform who rose through the 
ranks of the central-planning state 
industrial apparatus in the former 
Soviet Union, replied that Russian 
industry w as already heavily in- 
debted. with interest rales that 
were “too high, not too low" for 
many companies. 


Mr. Aslund said the problem 
went beyond cheap credit for in- 
dustry. “The basic problem is that 
for a long time state enterprises 
didn't lake the government serious- 
ly, and went back to their old ways 
of relying on the government to 
print money for them instead of 
urging more efficiency,” he said. 
“We need to start everything new." 

Mr. Volsky contended that “As- 
lund sounds like a neo-Bolshevik 
and Fyodorov sounds like he 
comes from another planet” 

When asked what Western gov- 
ernments and multilateral organi- 
zations should do about aid now 
that the reformers have been shut 
out of the Russian government, the 
iadusuy association president re- 
plied sarcastically: “The West 
should stop promising and start de- 
livering. and governments should 
not facilitate arguments m Russia.” 

Mr. Fyodorov took a stem view, 
saying he was opposed to the IMF 
or others “bending the rales too 
much.” He added mat training and 
technical assistance were now more 
important than money, Mr. Aslund 
inasted it was slid “important for 
the West to stay positively en- 


scheduling was “inevitable and itis ^ repjy“ ^ 

ogn debt, including a $500 million Q 11311 ® ^ . 

paymrat ^ ibe London dub of ^^^pfoiabitthepiira: 

commercial bank creditors. iwwuiaiavr 

“Now that may not go ahead,’ 
he said. T foresee trouble this year 
in keeping up on. certain 
meats." 

Mr. Volsky ridiculed the prob- 
lem of Russia’s debt burden, com- staff of 

plaining that Western governments work for Mr. 

had been more generous toward the 1,000 
paUrs debt ton Russia’s. He Oemamyrto **** ^ 


, t - 

4} 3#; 


ly in the budget, vrinditsvenn^ 

porumt in our «xmtry. I 
start restructuring the 10° *”88^ 


asked about the ability of 
Russia to service its more than $80 
trifficn of externa] debt including 
$24 billion of com m ercial bank 
debt, Mr. Fyodorov said debt re- 


changed the subject to note that 
Third World countries stall owed 
Moscow about $100 When. 

“Let the Western governments 
help us to recover our debts first,” 
be said. 

The Russian industry leader re- 
fused to be pinned down even when 
asked to list the most urgent steps 
needed to store the Russian econo- 
my this year. 

. “First, I would have the govern- 
ment renew negotiations with Fyo- 
dorov to return/' he said, as the 
former finance minister shook his 
bead. “I would stabilize relations 
with other former Soviet republics, . 
that I would take into account re- 
gional economic interests within 
Russia and I would keep pressure 
on to support small and medium 
business." 


them to return. - 

Mr. Aslund said that among the 
most critical steps to be taken he 
would seek to stabilize the ruble, 
.dismiss the central bank chief, give 
the minister real authority 

ova- fiscal pdagr and make farm 

seccmd-io-command of the govern- 
meat , _ 

Hie xonadtable ended on a bit- 
tersweet note, with Mr. Volsky 
half-daring at a smiling Mr. Fyo- 
dorov. Wbaf was the biggest differ- 
ence in their outlooks? “He be- 
lieves reproduction and I believe in 
money," said Mi. Fyodorov, in a 


i 


re ference to Mr. Volsky’s Soviet 






j ?|V 


i it if 

! ii*;:.; - • 

r? ,L ' : 

ItfC' 1 -' ... - -- 

jetf**-". 


agreed, “I believe in production 
and he believes in money ” 


PROFILES: A Look at the Ups and Downs of 4 Foreign Firms Doing Business in China COMPARE: Weighing Step by Step and Big Bang 


j. •; 


Continued Iran Page 7 
during hot months, making John- 
son's Raid electric bug-killing de- 
vices popular items even among the 
relatively poor. 

On the other band, they see peo- 
ple living in dreadfully cramped 
conditions, often a family of three 
occupying a small room, 'sharing a 
kitchen with several other families 
and using chamber pots instead of 
toilets. Demand among such peo- 
ple for, say. Pledge furniture polish 
or Johnson's bathroom cleaners is 
bound to be limited. 

Johnson has learned a lot during 
the six years since it launched its 
operation. The company is faring 
better after some initial mistakes, 
which Mr. Hu admits were based 
on a “rosy" view of the market 

For example, he noted, a $2.35 
air freshener that appeals to the 
relatively high-income residents of 
Shanghai will not sell at all in the 
intenor city of Chengdu, where the 
cost equals almost 7 percent of a 
typical worker’s monthly pay. 


Chung Sfaing Textile Co. Three 
years ago. when Chung Shing Tex- 
tile Co. of Taiwan built a factory- on 
the Chinese mainland to make its 
“Three Guns” brand of underwear, 
executives were not t hinking much 
about selling to Chinese consum- 
ers. Rather, they were planning to 
do what thousands of other Tai- 
wanese and Hong Kong firms have 
done: take advantage of cheap la- 
bor costs and export the factory’s 
output to rich countries. In Chung 
Shing’s case, the target market for 
the underwear was Japan. 

At its plant in the outskirts of 
Shanghai, Chung Shing pays work- 
ers an average of $60 a month, less 
than one-twelfth of what it must 
pay Taiwanese. 


aese consumers a whole new level 
of comfort. The Chinese have been 
living for years with garments 
made of cheap, inflexible cotton 
fabric. Chung Shing makes a cot- 
ton fabric that adjusts much better 
to the bodv's movements. 


“Living standards are improving 
rapidly, especially in coastal cit- 
ies," said Ko Turig Chou, the Tai- 
wanese manager of Chung Shing’s 
Shanghai factory. “So they can af- 
ford it and are willing to buy.” 


Not only did the corapany 
, its labor o 


save 

substantial sums on its labor costs, 
but it also discovered that it could 
easily sell its production of under- 
wear locally, even though a pair of 
its briefs costs almost $5. 

Chung Shing pulled off this coup 
because its underwear offered Clu- 


Avon Products Co. Barry Wong 
general manager of Avon's opera- 
tion in Guangzhou, remembers 
scouting the Chinese market during 
the late 1980s and noticing some- 
thing important gang on at depart- 
ment store cosmetics counters — 
or. more precisely, not going on. 

Little interaction was taking 
place. Customers, presumably ex- 
pecting die brusque service for 
which Chinese clerks are re- 
nowned. “would just pay and 
leave." recalled Mr. Wong. “No 


one would ask, 'What color is suit- 
able for my slrinT or how to apply 
the product" 

So Mr. Wong drew a conclusion 
that has proved correct: An army 
of Avon ladies dispensing beauty 
tips would fare well here. 

Chinese women slopped wearing 
makeup during the Maoist fervor 
of the 1960s and 1970s. because 
they were taught that painting 
one's face was a filthy bourgeois 
custom. These days, they generally 
prefer to look like the Hoag Kong 
models they see on TV rather than 
paragons of socialist virtue. So the 
market is ripe for a company spe- 
cializing in explanations of bow to 
choose and use cosmetics. 


revenue of more than S3 billion, 
but Mr. Wong believes that sales 
more than doubled in 1993 and are 
set to shoot up again this year. 


ContcBued from Page 7 


Northern Telecom Ltd. It is not 
hard to understand why the China 
market generates a lot of enthusi- 
asm at Northern Telecom of Cana- 
da. For every 100 Chinese, there 
are only 1.6’ telephones, and the 
government has embarked on a big 
program to create a modem tele- 
communications system. By the 
year 2000. China plans to install 
three times as many phone lines as 
currently exist in Britain. 


Since starting operations here in 
September 1990, Avon has had 
trouble keeping up with the boom- 
ing demand, fn the first two weeks, 
according to Mr. Wong. Avon sold 
all its inventory, and in 1992. ilsold 
$4 million worth. That was just a 
sliver of Avon's annual worldwide 


“We see China as the biggest 
telecommunications market of t the 
next 10 to 20 years," said Arthur 
MacDonald, who heads the com- 
pany’s Chinese operations, which 
are headquartered in the Shenzhen 
special economic zone. 

Is there a catch? Of course. Vir- 
tually every major telecommunica- 
tions company is competing to 
grab a share of this business. 


moved in deliberate stages from 
agricultnre to tight and medium in- 
dustries. There have been no real 
elections; Communist Party lead- 
ers have crushed pro-democracy 
demonstrations, jailed dissenters 
and kept restrictions on the press. 

Still, even as Washington decries 
Beijing's disregard for human 
rights, living standards in China 
are rising swiftly and its economy is 
zipping ahead. 

What lessons should be learned 
from Russia's obvious failure and 
China 's apparent success? 

William Overholt, a Hong Kong- 
based investment specialist, said m 
a recent book on economic devel- 
opment in China: “The noth a that 
one can have all good things — 
democracy and all forms of eco- 
nomic liberalization — instantly 
and simultaneously" is “a deeply 
held belief that has no grounding in 
practical historical e xp e ri ence" 

On the other side of the debate. 


mafay analysts insist the perfor- 
mance of the two economies does 
not repudiate sudden liberaliza- 
tion. The Russian and Chinese 
economies are so different, they 
said, that meaningful comparisons 
are impossible. 

Those who contend Russia 
should emulate China's go-slow de- 
velopment approach, asserted the 
economists Jeffery Sachs, who has 
advised Moscow, and Wing Thye 
Woo in a recent essay, “ntigfat as 
weQ advise Russia to solve its agri- 
cultural problems by. shifting from 
wheat to rice. 0 

The case against rapid reform 
cranes down to tins: Shock therapy 
unleashes chaos. If companies are 
privatized too quickly, there is con- 
fusion about ownership, 
meat responsibilities, product 
ability and production strategy. If 
pikes are liberalized all at once, 
inflation is virtually certain. If the 
central bank damps down on the 
money supply to keep inflation 
low, unproductive enterprises will 


go bankrupt, workers will lose jobs 
and sotial tumult will follow. 

Some US. analysts regard Beij- 
ing's heavy-handed rule as enlight- 
ened, compared with Russia’s. By' 
dampingdown on dissenters, they 
co n tend , China's elites have kept 
pro-growth economic policies on 
track end-spawned a middle class. 
Gradualists argue that, as in Asia’s 
other high-growlb economies, these 
new burghers will da root most 
greedily for new freedoms. 

' Throughout his tour of Asia, Mr. 

Ttenftawn hire «<*np tiasfaad that great- 
er economic development, and ex- 
- pawled trade aro among the surest 

means Of im pro ving human right *. 

Other observers, however, draw 
radically differenr conclusions 
from thr Chinese mid Russian ex- 
periences. Mr. Woo, an economist 
at the University of California, 

rin fl te p ite d rhinfw» j pnlni)lim re- 
flected deadlock among its political 
.elites — reformers versus oW-time 
Stalinists — not any centrally coor- 
dinated theory. . 




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NAS9AQ NATIONAL MARKET 


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! You will find bebw a listing or Job positions published Iasi Thursday | 

j in me International Herald Tribune under ihe International Recruitment Heading j 

i 

0 

P 

X 

! COMPANY "| 

COMMERCIAL MANAGER/Russia 

International Group of Service Companies 

OPERATIONS MANAGER/Rnssia 

International Group of Service Companies 

VARIOUS POSITIONS/Geneva 

— 

UNHCR (United Nations High Commissioner For Refugees 

. 

EUROPEAN GENERAL COUNSEL/ 
Brussels 

■ — — 

Medical Device Company 

SENIOR COORDINATOR 

Cisco Systems 

If you want to rscebte a copy of ike xper. please contact- 

The Classified Dept, in Paris: Tel.: [33-1 ) 46 37 94 74 - Fax: (33-1 ) 46 37 93 70 


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IjVTEKNATIOlSAL 


pg.«»lD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 1994 


Page 13 

ADVERTISING SECTION — 



Markets Are Remodeling 
Germany’s ‘Model State’ 

■ The last two years wiU unparalleled, nearlyimbro- ^^JwmienSerg' s 
likely go 'down in Baden- ken industrial ami export - ^ ^ster and 

Sifter of economic 

a relatively short, uneven 

MivetSnn • tra0f*ev*(Tl4* a 


UK, CIV HI UUTTU Ul IMttM 

WarttSiberg^s annals as expansion, and a century WTl 
a relatively short, uneven Mid a half of unflagging mi “they’ve base •on- 

recession triggering a mnovahon^nd - m ^k e V -to ’ Guangzhou, 

' long-term, top-to-bottom ■ Because^ n^wan Momeirey, Buenos Aires, 
resmKtn^oiib^stiae. . the automobile and . SasCity. ascertaining. 
Six quarters of economic ical engineering sectors js-g these markets 

contraction have been sue- the state s Weeds price and feature 

needed by one of rising .ties - ^^n P ons.” 

industrial, .output and because it was accompanied ex £r'~ die bkterpartof five 
exports. At the recession’s by a <P “SSS'irASJrtS decades, we hadit very 

Ssaasiss sffizs&ssa - — ’ 

nearly a U pans of the busi- 
ness world. . 

Over the last year and a 

•',n .T>-J TOM vri-f P TT, Kf>T V 


■were recoraeo, nuv uuuwj 

-dramatic by current world 
standards, and certainly no 
'cause for alarm considering 
the state’s overall 1 track 
record: five decades , of 



_ asV " says. Werner 
Schmidt, chainnan of the 

board of managing directors 

of Stidwestdeutscne 

Landesbank, the state s 

"""Over tie last year and a 

ahead and 

of the state, s. business,. theworid is still buying 
financial, official and edu- ' the last few 

cational commumoes -have m- Baden _WQrttemberg 

been wrestling with a^sjp- u>ckoo the lead- 

gle, : essential question* , ^^ , £ ennaiI y’s patents 

i&grssss 

-««*§& gasssts -S“egrZ 

§nti gfe mm 

wmmrn mm 

_ • j start nro- 



The Black Forest s 

White Tablecloths 


Building on the past: 
today's auto manufacturing 
continues the tradition 
begun by Carl Benz and 
Gottlieb Daimler in the 
19th century. 

Baden- W-D rue m berg has 

never been busier. 

“If the world markets are 


niescio ex cited reports on patn- ‘bmalso generate 

5Ssa ~ e “ 

AN Investor’sGutoeto^Reokin, 


. J ”v£ s .^ a-s-sgag 

Jj-Sf SEish“r are 

sa.***-* fc-Bga mms 


SEl^ST^--- -gMS-ffiSdSa. ^^fgBTE I^ioc-'n.an-tetib; 

sagSiSsss s«s 

states geographic” TMT- ^ BnliSeTfealure auto- manufacture cues and 

kmatched by its Wtie con . vices, Leamng ™ . attractions. 


mne. uuo _ — . 

feted as one <*rthe 
trading centers of tne 

Con rinejrt^Today» « . Gaggenau. wwu* 

state’s g«^P£™ . SJ EdJingen feature auto- 

ety is matdred^ 1 ^™; 'S^nS^ng, con- 

v, and indostiiT 

• . • ^ sectors. There*** a num- 

Xake Gxmstao«»-tW^ w^Fspas in the region; 
Swabia: The ^ lake and including^ Baden-Baden, 

northern onebf tte most famous m 

' Forest-Baar- 
Heoberg: Located at the 


go with its transport ser 
Jices, Leading manufactur 
mo centers are Mannheim^ 
Weinheim. Heidelberg an 
Wiesloch. The northern Mid 
Astern pans of the region. 

_ _ .l. rvtonwiild. are 


ing centers. The region Tu* 
a wide range of medieval 
cities and other tourist 
attractions. 

East Wurttemberg. Pre- 
cision mechanics , and 

°P^:^l anC 1„' l omobde 



The mountains came 
eons ago, thrown up by 
seismic and volcanic arti 
itv. Trees, mostly conifers, 
nourished in the Mack sod 
left behind. They grew so 
thickly that the AtaMm. 
the local Germanic tnoe, 

peered into the impenetra- 
ble gloom and called it *e 
Schwarzwald - Biaca 

F °Some of the Alemanm 
and their descendants 
braved the heights and iso- 
lation and made senlemenis 
in the forest. Mosi of Jem 
slaved on the Rhine side ot 
. 3 ,, i /..titivnrea 


wellness has become one of 

the region’s two big 

-smokeless industries. 
Thinv-eraht communities 

offer 158 different therapeu- 
tic facilities as well as sana- 
toriums and clinics, 
joining spa v.s.tors and 

vacationers on me 
Schwarzwald's windin B 
roads are restaurant entics 
and amateur - although no 
less dedicated - gourmets. 

No area in Germany has 
so many gourmet restau- 
rants. Baiersbronn a town 

of 16.000 located in the 

north Schwarzwald area 
. _ -_u. ,unp according 


"ayS onie -Rhine side of ^ according 

the valley and culuvated u re5tau . 

vinevards, producing wine - to me 
. _ j -L. n narucular- 


vineyaros. piuuut-...^ 

and, eventually, a particular- 
ly sumptuous cuisine. _ 
Mark Twain and legions 
of other late- 1 9th-centuiy 
wanderers came to hike the 
forest's depths in search ot 


to tne uauii-i"»'"- _ 
rant guide. The Schwarz- 

wald'area has 38 other com- 
parable “gourmet communi- 

UC bior is culinary excellence 
confined to the western part 





" r Bh,rk 

Forest house, with its jutting roof. ^ 

unspoiled nature. Later, a 5? 10 restau- 

hosiof less-athletic nature Germany^ 

lovers would dl * cove ^.S^ wertheim-Bettingen and 
forest via an inL ’^ dlbly Qhringen. in the northern 
binding gnd of nMds & f lhc slaie , while 

Here nature is still ■ quite P . be foun d in 

beautiful, although no anotne _ _ , nV . e 


Lie — 

illlUmvi « 1.. 

Ruvensburg. near i-unc 
C onstance. . f 

SliU the concentration oi 
world-class restaurants is 
strongest in the Schwarz- 


beautirui. , "r 

longer unspoiled, and i. 

now being appreciated by a 

different set of visitors in a 
^UsSSeut setting for 

a spa: clean air, mineral waia ^ when onc does 
springs -another product of ^ n dulge. the cure is 

the volcanic era - and jverm^ ^ hand/sa vs 

wooded surroundinas Christian Heydnch. a 

F T< F S M BlSSn ,40 Freiburg-based amateur 
kHo meters to the south, gourmet 


* 


nortnem . 

S&asBKg 

and Friedricbshsfen are 
-major industrial dengnt 

■•ssrsssi* 

Lake Constance and^ 

^Igsrsssssffi 

S^duniveratytowm 

/g&flWSSS 

- Weil am w |e, v 

f3 Sm Upper Wtie: ^mucapiui. 


of «- «gio;u °P^ e “ n g ' automobile 

^of tie odenwald. ore “P^l'and textilesere 
largely hilly and rural- ^ . u :^ «»•«'« snecialties. Hei- 


This region is famed for its 


Community’ s Local Base 



, 

Aalen, Waldstetten and 


ttsjtfrn ation al Outreach 

G?en"en are its major man- I 1_N 1 E/Kl hui 

Spring commumu^ Ess ,i„een. BBblingen and , heir own right. Foiling a 

Him: Forming the state s -ebon’s financial sec- hssiingen. h %wJlh iLS 

eastern flank, this area pro- the 

. u«,il ran Of* of aCTl- 


soci- 


OTS** A financial see- ^y^Td.iritdijionJI 

mm ssss S4K 

nationwide finance houses 
... .. mUu n maior 


UW II 

dusibcss nnrate community. 

Mcvcs-Baden-Wurt - P° E j sewhere , n Europe, 

berg’s businKSK- coUg imp ortant companies tend 

lively Germany sWadwg J g3te in central eco- 
exporters, trade wrtjds l r ° 0 C mic f regions. Here, too, 

tribute from or produ Raden-Wuruemberg is an 

exception . Greater Slut J|“ 1 
has Daimler-Benz iGer 
many's largest company). 
Robert Bosch (number 0) 
and about a quarter of the 

Se’s other top 50 compa- 
nies. Heidelberg, Wmbltn- 
oen Weinheim. Ober- 
kochen and nine other com- 
munities are home to Je 

rest, including such famous 


727 of 848 banks 
are locally owned 


cultural piuuu^«. . 

last three decades, the hu- 

toric city of lilm has been 
the center of massive pub- 
lic- and private-sector 
investment, 8 ivin .l Jf. a _ 
large-scale, diversified in- 
dustrial sector and one ot 
Germany's major research 
communities. 

Rcutlingen:Ttereg<ms locations a n over the 

northern portion forms part rtd Correspondingly, 
of the Greater Swttgart met- Baden _vvurttembergj 
ropolitan area, white ' feve broad-ranged 

southeastern cjner is m=n 

\v rural. Reutlingen, aid- h -^ ly internadon- 

staduMetringen, Bingen ^panies and banks are c ^Heidelberger 

and Kusterdmgen are ns r? local. They are ™J5 m aechinen AG (the 

leading nranufacturing " led in m array of rela- larfi;esl producer of 

ters, producing cloth ng, ro commum ues ^ l< ? V machine S ). An- 

ind ^ StlialSy ^nte throughout this “non-cen- gnn KG (Burope ' s 

motive components. tralized’* state. , c ar nf 

— n^d^n-wart all of Europe s 

“ economic fefljwj 


Wiistenrot building 

"broad base of small- 
sized companies, a local y 
based financial system, l l- 
billion DM in annual 
exports - this configuration 
...imiP Hi»mands on 


nationwide finance houses unique demands on 

didn't really play a mujo gc-ujl international 

role in either of Baden i es according 

WUrttemberg s two mdus Sc hmidt. 

trial revolutions. say^ . epical company m 
Werner Schmidt. cha1 *^? Baden^Surttemberg has a 

of the board of managmg B 6^ of 2Q0 million DM 
directors of Sudwest ^ bus - iness relationships 
deutsche Landesbank (Sud different countries, 

wpstLB), the central bank- wlu ' ° „ . — :j. -vnimns 

wt . e BtatP s 


S.-35 S7i3SS SS», 
S«¥BSS asa-iSls: 

S tudentsandele^t er5 . Obemtorfa^SLfjoOT^ featur e diversified manu- and infw- 

cn mronmentai _ with mternanonmiy . (optimncr sectors. 1 n . ■ .^.knninov hard- 


ter for toun^ — — ^ ^chvwnmw*. Caiw and Horo am 

students and ^ ectr L__ p . rs - bbeanndorf and St. .Ge^g .future diversified manu- 

Invironmentj engin^ _^th internationtdlys^ ^ing sectors. .This 
Offenburg, with -industrial, medical, p^"_ is Increasingly 

paper, chemical s jon- mecbanic and^ptic- ^ter for year- 

AmoS^ fctoric The Heil- 

"^itit^tilP^; ^?s Do^escti S ^Srsulm metr^ ~K"fbr'm.a. 

■SSW^-TS 

widely diversified ^ ' ’ • ^ :• 


Kmuiwiiix— ,._j 

mation-technology hard- 
ware and software, con- 
sumer durables and non- 

durables are leading prod- 

ucts.Stut.gartis_tie^on- 


mg roi uic . ■ 

output and businessde- 

^^sssass 

state's economic 
does issue from uw 
Stuttgart region, greater 
Stuttgart is- actually an 

SSmationoflOlustonc 

business areas, including 


rrlrihi KG (Europe's 
leadina manufacturer of 
chain saws), the ^“den- 
berg group (plastic-based 
engine components, sea- 
lants and non-wovens) and 
Carl Zeiss (precision 

^For' every 

heavyweights, there ar 
hundreds of ’’rnjke 1 
movers,” barely known out- 
side their small towns or 
niche markets, but interna- 
tional business powers in 


mg institution of tte site's 

3& billion Deutsche mark 

(S196 billion), 50,000- 
employee savings bank 

^“Both these revolutions 
involved locally founded 
companies with very new 
products - in the late : 19th 

century, the automobile, the 
portable drill, bonng and 

heading mac jnes even 


Mr. Schmidt explains. 
“Increasingly, these rela- 
tionships involve more Jan 
the simple interchange of 
aoods. Most state compa- 
nies have extensive interna- 
tional networks of fore'S" 
offices, distribution tenters 
and, in many cases, produc- 
tion facilities. - 

At the same time, for a 
variety of practical reasons 
«hP advantages 


kneading maehineseven *«Wo J ^ advantages 
plasrics^ptocesring ^ ma- of dea.ing witi a tntsrnd 


-v 

9 

9 .... 


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3r’- 




.* ■*. . 
ill. 


»- 


n:. 



OI QCiMIUe ’ . 

partner in one s own lan- 
guage and currency - 

Baden-WUrttemberg s ex- 
porters have displayed S|^ 

loyalty to their Hausbanken 
(long-time bankers). As a 
result, the state s major 
banks have become experts 
in managing “site-to-site 
international business rela- 
tionships. , - 

In conducting this muln- 
sougm - faceted mass of financial 

level, producing a commu f techn i ca i operations, 

nity-based financial sector £m banks use a range 

in ihe state_ of classic methods. In addi- 

J “!L; don to maintaining sub- 

oaiiM unallv and sidiaries, associates an 

the state are mutually an _ . l9 international 

locally owned SaUemers. Sddwest- 
savings banks and buiioing _ _ . — i — ^ finnn- 

. including 56 Ot 


plastics puK-« 3 ...o 

chines, offseipnnting press- 
es for newspapers J and 
numerically control ed ma- 

chines,” says Mr. Schmidt 
“These were not the q u, ck- 
return. high-yieM lusms that 
would capture the eye or 

TOSM" Schmidt 

explains, is that corpora- 
tions and there work forces 
sought finanerng at tie local 
level producing a commu 
‘_TL. financial sector 


S Ses. including 56 of 
die stale’s 60 largest banks. 


Many 
founded 


of 


these locally 
mutuals” have 


rouiiubu — — .. _ 

gone on to become natron- 
Wide powers, ,n ^ lu( J in ° . 
Schwabisch Hall and 


rtnanciai cci*r«». 

LB, the stale’s largest finan- 
cial institution, has corre- 
sponding relationships with 
some 1.000 banks, plus 
access to another 7UU 

Continued on page 14 


This advertising sectionwasp-odo^n^ emreety^by 

the supplements dms'onof^ '. lt wa s written by Ter- 
1 bune s advertising deparonen - Munich, and 

ssaswssssa^i-."'*- 

I nomic Affairs and the display advertisers. 





r « 


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Page 14 

advertising section 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 1994 


advertising section. 


r GERMANY: BADEN-W^FIT] 

; - v ... ' ' : • > if V. , r l f.v ’:f: ; :* ■%. 


-' v .: - ■ 


The Prime Minister Defines 
The State’s Role in Europe 




Erwin TcuFel has been 
prime minister of Baden- 
VVurltemberg since 
January 1991. After earn- 
ing a degree in public 
administration in 1961, 
Mr. Teufel occupied a 
variety of local public 
positions. In 1972, he was 
elected to the state parlia- 
ment and subsequently 
held a number of ministe- 
rial-level posts. Since 
2992. Mr. Teufel has been 
rice president of the 
Assembly of European 
Regions. He recently 
spoke about his state's 
future in Germany and in 
Europe. 

Yntir state's government, 
business and educatitm 
minimtnilits have been 
engaged in an unprecedent- 
ed nmnd <>f deliberations 
mapping our an economic 
future for Baden- 
Wiiitteniber g. Where do you 
now siar, 1 1 in this process . !’ 

The first phase of inven- 
tory-taking and consulting 


‘European unity 
is a fact of life' 

pie led. Our "Economy 
2I.M KT" commission has just 
come out with a highly 
rieidilcJ report analyzing in 
great depth \vhat‘s been 
accomplished and what 
need*, lo he done in this 
slate and who's going to do 
n - the .state's companies 
and communities, the 


unions and universities, my 
administration, even the 
role of the European Union 
in all this. The proposals are 
now being implemented. A 
newly established panel will 
monitor this implementa- 
tion and will report on its 
successes and failures, and 
make any necessary 
changes along the way. This 
phase wall be funded by the 
1. 1 billion Deutsche marks 
[S647 million] realized 
from the privatization of 
state-owned building insur- 
ance companies. 

From the latest economic 
figures, which show turn- 
arounds in industrial pro- 
duction and orders from 
abroad and an end to 
declines in GDP. it would 
seem that the need for these 
measures has been at least 
partially obviated. 

Our immediate economic 
troubles may well be com- 
ing to an end. Many of the 
inlernational factors that 
caused them - the recession 
in all our major markets, the 
strong appreciation of the 
Deutsche mark against 
other major currencies - 
have substantially moderat- 
ed. A number of forecasts 
have even predicted a bit of 
economic growth in 1994. 
Unemployment is. however, 
going to remain a problem 
in the stale for a good while. 
To alleviate it. I've asked 
two universities in Baden- 
Wiirttemberg to come up 
with practical proposals - 
not more studies, we have 
more than enough of them - 


but measures this state can 
take within the confines of 
our limited resources. The 
long-term restructuring of 
our economy, however, has 
just begun. Whether that’s 
going to take three, four or 
five years is not in my 
power to say. Of course, 
many of the state's individ- 
ual companies are much 
further along in this process. 
They went through their 
“shakedown phase” a year 
or two ago. and have reor- 
ganized, reoriented and 
repositioned. Many of them, 
quite a bit leaner and more 
aggressive, are recording 
gains in turnover, profits 
and exports. 

Baden-Wurttemberg has 
been a leading advocate of 
regional-level ties, especial- 
ly those within Europe. The 
European Union is not 
especially popular at the 
moment. Do you see these 
ties as an effective, alterna- 
tive way of promoting 
European unity? 

Very few of Germany’s 
achievements - economic 
growth, reunification - over 
the last five decades would 
have been possible without 
the EU and its predecessors. 
Some 70 percent of Baden- 
Wurttemberg' s trade is with 
Europe's countries. So 
European unity is not a dis- 
tant goal for us. it's been a 
daily, highly appreciated 
fact of life for a long time. 
Our four decades of "being 
European" have shown us 
one important thing: greater 
unity shouldn't be equated 



University Towns Focus on Innovation 


Erwin Teufel, prime minis- 
ter of Baden- Wumemberg. 

with greater centralism. Nor 
does this unity have to be 
prescribed from above. Put 
simply, this means that 
there are responsibilities 
that can only be handled in 
Brussels, and just as many 
things best assigned to the 
local, regional or national 
levels. Because these lower- 
level. community-to-com- 
munity, region-to-region 
interactions have generally 
been highly productive, 
they have built a ground 
swell of sentiment for 
Europe, for unity. One of 
these lower-level responsi- 
bilities is education in all its 
forms, operating systems of 
primary, post-secondary 
and professional education. 
There has been a highly 
fruitful exchange of experi- 
ence. ideas and personnel 
with Rhone-Alpes, Cata- 
lonia, Wales. Saxony and 
our other partner regions, an 
exchange now being put to 
use in our outreach to 
Eastern Europe. 


Through a major pro- 
gram of investment in 
research facilities and 
technology - transfer, 
Baden- Wurttemberg’s 
nine historic university 
towns - intellectual cen- 
ters dating back to the 
Middle Ages — have been 
transformed into centers 
of innovation. 

The past is what millions 
of tourists discover each 
year in Heidelberg. 
Tubingen, Freiburg and 
Baden- Wiirttemberg’s six 
other university towns. 
They come to see the tav- 
erns in which the Student 
Prince reveled, the tower in 
which Hdlderlin waxed 
lyric, the streets that Hegel, 
Hesse and Schiller walked. 

Each year, these same 
cities welcome other kinds 
of visitors. Research fellows 
and venture capitalists come 
by the thousands, and their 
destinations are often not 
the historic city centers, but 
the tracts of anonymous- 
looking low-rise buildings 
in the surrounding areas. 

These areas represent the 
present in Baden- 
Wurttemberg’ s university 
towns. They house universi- 
ty research departments, the 
public-sector Fraunhofer 
and Steinbeis institutes, 
other applied and large- 
scale research centers, cor- 
porate research departments 
and the independent tech- 
nology factories of dozens 
of budding companies. 

In these buildings, bud- 
ding Keplers, Geigers and 
Oppenheimers have devel- 
oped nanotechnologies, 
micro-sensorics. fractal ly 


The Art of This State Is Communications 


Within 10 years, the “photon- 
ic era" will be upon us, accord- 
ing lo John Mayo, president of 
AT&T Bell Laboratories. 
Instead of electrons, photons 
will process and relay vast vol- 
umes of information and signals 
in and between computers and 
communications systems. 

II Baden- Wiimemberg’ s scien- 
tists ha\e their way, that era will 
a»mc e\en sooner. Building on 
their successes with ultra-high- 
speed. high -capacity transistors, 
the scientist* have come up with 
OEICs i opto -electronic integrated 
circuits), the successor of today's 
microprocessors. OEICs will form 


the building blocks of tomorrow's 
“communication highways.” A 
large-scale test track for these 
highways, called OPAL 5, has 
been in operation in the Stuttgart 
area since 1992. 

This brand-new .information 
transport technology will soon be 
put to work carrying some heavy 
cargo. The slate's advances in 
sensorics are multiplying the 
amount and range of data to be 
relayed. 

In 1991, 22.3 billion Deutsche 
marks ($12.8 billion) was spent 
worldwide on sensors - the “five 
senses” of the technological 
world. According to a survey con- 


ducted by Basel's Prognos mar- 
ket-research company, that .figure 
will double by 2000. for a very 
simple reason. Distances and tol- 
erances are now measured in. 
nanometers, time in nanoseconds, 
dangers in farts per nanobiUton, 
and information from these ongo- 
ing measurements in gigabytes. 
There is a surging demand for 
sensors capable of perceiving 
these ultra-minimal changes in 
concentrations of pollutants, in 
magnetic attraction and in surface 
characteristics, and then relaying 
this information on-line to com- 
puter-based monitoring networks. 

Al latest count, there are 13,439 


different kinds of seasons; many- : ] 
now featuring, such esoteric open?' - 
ating materials as algae. (biqeetH - i 
sors) and ceramics (for. uses ia ; 
lOOOpdegree-pIus environments,}. •, 
Badear-Wfirtteroberg’ S; research . 
labs ;uxlmedium-SK£ri companies ' 
are centers of serisorir develop- 
ment Thetr sensors not only gam- 
er data, they also use advanced ' 
communication technologies to 
feed it into operating systems. The •. 
state's success in de&gtnog. tailor- • 
made, sensor packages has given 
rise to' AS1S,. or “application spe- 
cific integrated system,” replacing I 
the cmrem ASIC (application spe- 
cific integrated circuit)- . . ■ 


FOR AN IMMEDIATE RETURN ON YOUR INVESTMENT: 
G0TTMADINGEN, LAKE CONSTANCE 


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lui^tnrpurib tnirnaiflinem - (men Hltere Progro j Has a Future 


Continued from page 1 3 

through a working agree- 
ment with Standard Char- 
tered Bank. 

“Collectively, our cus- 
tomers generate volumes of 
capital and currency ade- 
quate io make the state one 
of Europe's major financial 
centers." says Mr. Schmidt, 
“a center, however, that is 
spread out over some 
36.000 square kilometers. 
Through our 91 member 
financial institutions. Alb- 
stadt. Gengenbach. Ditzin- 
gen and the rest of the 
state's communities are 
interlinked with the world's 
financial markets and have 
on-line access to all its 
instrumentalities and ser- 
vices.” 

In one key regard, the 
paths of the slate's business 
and financial communities 


have recently diverged. 
Wrestling with a worldwide 
recession and resulting falls 
in trade-led demand, the 
slate's industrial companies 
are now putting a year and a 
half of recession behind 
them. 

For the state’s financial 
sector, on the other hand, 
the last few years have been 
a time of steady expansion. 
According to official 
sources, the total volume of 
loans made by the state's 
banks to companies, con- 
sumers and communities 
rose from 3 1 3 billion DM in 
1989 to 432 billion DM at 
the end of September 1 993. 
with incoming funds - prin- 
cipally deposits - volume of 
stocks and securities trans- 
actions showing even more 
dramatic increases. 

SiidwestLB did better 
than that. Capping years of 



Werner Schmidt of 
SiidwestLB. 

steady advances, its results 
for the first half of 1993 
showed a 20 percent rise in 
total balance sheet sum to 
135 billion DM, and a 22 
percent increase in profits 
from ordinary activities. 


organized production cen- 
ters and other products and 
systems promising to revo- 
lutionize the world and our 
relationship with it 
This transmutation of uni- 
versity town to "universal 
center” is an important part 
of Baden -Wiirttem berg’s 


The idea behind tins cluster- 
ing is generally and inaccu- 
rately called “technology 
transfer.” A more appropri- 
ate term, according to 
Dieter Spori, the state's 
minister of economic 
affairs, would be “interac- 
tive development" 








rr'M.-*',. 


Tubingen is one of Germany ’s oldest and most famous uni- 
versity centers. 


approach to business devel- 
opment Over the last few 
decades, the state has clus- 
tered its 200 research facili- 
ties in its centers of innova- 
tion. In addition to the uni- 
versity towns, these have 
included such manufactur- 
ing communities . as 
Villingen-Schwenningen. 
Schwabisch Gmund, Sig- 
maringen and Reutlingen. 


“We’ve taken stock of 
our communities' individual 
areas of strengths, and then 
provided them with the req- 
uisite complement of 
research and business devel- 
opment capabilities,” says 
die minister. "After that, it's 
up to the communities' con- 
stituent elements to work 
together to develop viable 
products and services for 


• world markets. Ulm i- / 
leading example of 
interactive development- 1Ls 
600 -year-old core centers 
on its majestic cathedral ana 

is encased by forlitico 

walls. Its university is a nit 
younger, having been 
founded in 1967. 

Over the last two and a 
half decades. "Science 
City" has grown around and 
amid the university- This is 
a cluster of interactive- 
development institutes: cen- 
ters of laser-based medical 
technologies, applied- 
knowledge processing, solar 
and hydrogen-based energy 
sources and 1 1 Steinbeis 
Foundation agencies. 

Science City has had a 
new resident since October 
1992. Joining a range ot 
other private-sector research 
centers, Daimler-Benz's 
270 million Deutsche mark 
($156 million) facility 
employs a staff of 1.000. 
developing products and 
technologies in microelec- 
tronics. production and 
environmental engineering. 

Lahr. in the upper Rhine 
Valley, has been home to 
200,000 Canadian soldiers 
and civilians stationed at its 
NATO air base over the last 
three and half decades. By 
the end of 1994. the 
Canadian military commu- 
nity will be gone, but the 
airfield and its related facili- 
ties will be converted into a 
center of air-based logistic 
and other professional ser- 
vices. The 600-heelare site 
is to provide the rapidly 
growing Upper Rhine area 
with a “business link” to 
world markets. 


Pinpointing Areas of Growth 


Dieter Spori has been 
Baden- Wurttemberg’s 
minister of economic 
affairs and deputy prime 
minister since June 1992. 
After earning a doctorate 
in economics, he worked 
in a variety of corporate 
and institutional economic 
think tanks and taught at 
the University of Stutt- 
gart In 1976, he was elect- 
ed to the Bundestag, serv- 
ing there until 1988. Mr. 
Spdri is also chairman of 
Germany’s Conference of 
Economic Ministers. 

You 've pinpointed “ intel- 
ligent services” as a key 
area of future economic 
growth in Baden-Wurnem- 
berg. Is there an ongoing 
move into such services in 
the state? 

The service sector is 
growing in this state, as it is 
everywhere else in the 
world. On a percent basis. 
Baden-Wurttemberg’ s ser- 
vice sector is still relatively 
small, to be expected from a 
state with our strength in 
manufacturing. Actually, 
should one count the service 
subsidiaries and activities of 
such major manufacturers 
as Daimler-Benz, (BM or 
Bosch, you’d probably 
come up with a much high- 
er figure. Certain types of 
services do much more than 
create jobs or raise the 
GDP. Production-oriented, 
communication and media 
services cause increases in 
operating output and allow 
companies to create new 
generations of products. 
That's why these catalysts 
for change are a main focus 
of our business develop- 
ment activities, of our 
model regions, data com- 


munications highways, 
media factories and other 
projects and incentive pro- 
grams. In any case. 1 believe 
it's counterproductive to 
base business development 
policy on a false distinction 
between the secondary and 
tertiary sectors, on what has 
become a statistical conven- 
tion. Take a look at this 
state's breakthrough sectors 
- mass transport and traffic 



Dieter Spori, minister of 
economic affairs. 

management systems, ener- 
gy supply and microtech- 
nologies - and tel! me 
where the hardware leaves 
off and the software starts. It 
can't be done. These sys- 
tems are integrated units 
and have been developed as 
such. 

Baden-Wurttemberg 's 
products get high marks for 
their technologies, perfor- 
mance and features. The 
rap: the products are often 
“ over-engineered , ” too 
advanced for their respec- 
tive markets. Do you agree 
with this analysis? 

On a product-by-product 
basis, in some cases: as a 


general description of the 
sector, definitely not. 
Engineers, inventors, tinker- 
ers - whatever you want to 
call them - transformed this 
stale from Europe’s poor- 
house into one of its .most 
productive regions. That 
contribution shouldn't be 
overlooked. In the recent 
past, the engineers may 
have gone too far, produc- 
ing masterpieces better than 
what their markets needed 
or wanted. Our challenge is 
to maintain this technologi- 
cal lead - a vital advantage 
in the world's highly com- 
petitive markets - while tai- 
loring individual products to 
meet purchaser needs. In 
my contacts with state com- 
panies. I've noticed an 
encouraging trend. Cor- 
porate sales and marketing 
executives now have a 
greater amount of input into 
initial product design. If y«>u 
look at the newest products 
from our state's companies. 
I think you'll notice rhe 
change. These products 
have been “market-sized." 
In one key way, the state's 
“tinkerers" have, however, 
already done their job. First 
they took us from making 
clocks and watches to 
machines and chips and 
automobiles. Now their 
innovations are taking us 
into such high-growth areas 
as environmental engineer- 
ing. The slate produces 24 
percent of Germany's 
“intelligent*' environmental 
products. Some 800,000 
jobs will be created in 
Germany's environmental 
technology sector by the 
end of the decade; 300,000 
of those in Baden- 
WUrttemberg. 


STUTTGART 

Marketing GmbH 

A World of Sights To Be Seen - And Experienced 


afji^rt's Editing is truly one ot Europe's great sights: seven hffis 
o'l.-rouni: J &y a'magnificant. forested green belt. Vineyards drape 
too hi3v s!?pes and extend afl the way dawn into the city's central 
business area. This mixture ot the cosmopolitan and countryside - 
p:us an especially mild climate - is characteristic ot the Bfestyta in 
Stuttgart, capital of Germany's third-Iargest state. 

Sites to be seen: such masterpieces of modem architecture as 
?r<rtinii s- Nouo Slaatsgalerie fur mode me Kunst, which houses one 
m Europe's largest collections of Picasso, and the 
'.Vei'V’nhafsiodlung residential complex, with structures from Mies 
van der Rohe and Le Corbusier, tram Waiter Gropius and other 
mapr Bauhaus architects Masterpieces of modem technology are 
to 1™ found in the Porsche and Mercedes-Benz museums. The 
’Withtlma' features architecture and masterpieces of a different 
Tscrt it - arabesque walls are home to Germany's only joint botanical 
qard-ins and zoo. Masters of the performing arts are the dancers of 
me Sfuttgarter Baffef. one of the world's greatest troupes. 

Events to be enjoyed: Stuttgart turns itself into a “Wsindorf* 
(ivinc viltago) al the end of August, providing vast quantities ot both 
wine and high spirits. Cannstatfs Volksfest (the second-largest 


bear festival in the world) offers fun for the whole family and wB be 
held from September 25th to October 1(Xh this year. In December, 
tfs time for Europe's largest {and most beautiful) Christmas market, 
which occupies all of Sfuttgarfs downtown area, and for the 
German premiere of "Miss Saigon,’ the international hit musical. 

A prime site for spotting events: in 1983, all of Stuttgart 
thronged to attend the work! championships of track and field. In 
1994, the city will host the Eurecaid Tennis Open in mkJ-February, 
the WeiBenhof tennis tournament in duty, the international back and 
field meet at the end of August and toe international equestrian 
tournament in October. 

A place to relax and reconnolten nineteen springs are 
located within the city's limits, giving the dty and its numerous spas 
Europe's largest supply of mineral water. Located within a short trip 
from Stuttgart are such attractions as Heidebeig, Baden-Baden, 
toe Black Forest and Lake Constance. 

A city <o gel to known write, fax or call us, and we'fl give you 
information on group and individual tours, special corporate rates, 
hotels and restaurants, ticket reservations and anything else you 
wbh to knew about Stuttgart. 


Sruttgort-Mcuketmg GmbH 
LoutemchlogersfrasM 3 D- 70 173 Stuttg a rt 
T«L: (+49-71 1) 22 28 - 0 Fare: (+49-71 1) 22 28 270 
Stuilgart and its tourist authority 


First it was the bkyde, and then the automobile- Today, a whole 
range of atw innovations Erom Karlsruhe are moving the wheels of 
change. 

Today, as hr the past, the dty moving the world is powered by 

teamwork, enterprise and an openness to rhe new ideas 

and new ways of lookn^Kd (nations. j 

To get your business in Europe moving, 

please oontacti 


WIRTSCHAFTSFORDERUNG KARLSRUHE 
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT 
OF KARLSRUHE CITY. TEL (+49-721) 133 - 73 00 


A 

])*£. tuMp. fCu^t 


Developing diversity and innovation; the Bruchsal 
business community is broadly based, a mix of large and 
medium-sized German and international companies active 
in everything from mechanical and electric engineering to 
food processing and textiles. The Bruchsal Center of 
Innovation and Trade is home to a number of state-of-the-art 
companies providing technological services. 

Developing the markets of the present - and of the future; 
Bruchsal is located in the middle of three of Germany's most 
dynamic metropolitan areas: Mannheim, Heidelberg and 
Karlsruhe. Bruchsal's Ost-Akademie provides courses in 
business administration to executives from the CIS countries, 
thus helping further economic growth in the east. 

Developing your business: our twelve contiguous 
communities offer a wide range of offices, facilities and sites. 
If you are looking for a place from which to develop your 
business, please contact us: 

Region ale Wi rfschafts ford erung Bruchsal GmbH * A 

Mr. Wolfgang Kempennann ? *m 

Dr. Kad-Meistei-Str, 12/13 m 9 * M 

D- 76646 Bruchsal M 

Fax ( 449 - 7211 ) 180 03 BRUCHSAL 




pMrmasNt.w+Afr. 1 







X 



ADVERTISING SECTION 






INTERNA 


TiftTJAi, HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 1994 


v ft 




MWESBft 



BADEN- 


. *\-’A 




' ( 
' ' I 


^1- , * 


Environment 
On THii Shores 



Lake Constance 


-*:• : 
b ■>, i 


Lake Constance, or the Bodensee, • 
is one of Europe’s most beautiful 
and widely visited natural attrac- 
tions* It is also Germany's largest 
lake and the Continent’s largest - 
reservoir of potable water,' supply-, 
ing 5 million people. 

■ Keeping the lakenamraL despite a ., 
growing influx of tourists^ year-round 
residents, agricultural Huid industrial 
users, ‘ is the Job- ; of Baden- 
Wiirttemberg's environmental engi- 
ne eringscctor. Working with the 


Pollution reduced by 50 
percent to 75 percent 


er 




lake’s other users — Bavaria, 
Switzerland and Austria - the state has 
implemented far-reaching, integrated 
environmental management systems. • 
The lake is framed by the snow- . 
crowned Alps and fed by, of Eurqpe]s 
most storied rivers, die Rhine — at this 
stage a relatively pristine, rushing tor- 
rent Thanks to a unique configuration 
of geography and winds, its banks are 
lined with palms and other flora typi- 
cal of the subtropical climes of 
Southern Europe, including^ banks of 
orchids on Mainau, the “island .of 


flowers.” It is an attractive spot, as 7 
million tourists discover every year. 
About half of them descend upon 

Konstanz, Oberiihgen, 
and other communities on the lake s 
northern shore. Meersburg, a village 
of 5,500 inhabitants, records more 
than 250,000 overnight smysayear. 

Many visitors come for the natural 
attractions, bat stay for the ^economic 
ones. One of Germany's 
ing regions, the Bodensee s north 
shore is now borne to more than 1 mu- 
Iksn people, giving it apopu^ion den- 
sity 50 percent higher than dial off.™? 

. Stuttgart region. The inhabitants work 
for amix of medical-technology , air- 
craft-apparel and b«Hd^aine compa- 
nies as well as in. the region sfloun^- 

ing food-processing sector.JThe norm 
shore's bmteriand is one of Germany s 
- major sources of -fruit, dairy products, 

hops and wine. . . . 

' ‘ All too often, popularity and pros- 
: perity herald environmental pressure 
• and the end of picture-postcard good 

looks. Although it has been neither 
easy or inexpensive, the Bodensee has 

tried to prove an exception to this role. 

In fact, the Bodensee's environment 
has been improving. Oyer the last 15 
years, the amount of phosphates and 


other pollutants in its waters has been 
reduced by between 50 percent and 75 
nercent, giving the lake a water rahn 0 

SPSrW- Some 18 ki!ome j e S 

of shoreline have been ^turned to 
nature, and traffic-generated noise and 
emissions sharply decreased. 

This improvement is the result ol 

the tri-country “Bodensee Are 

■'^SSSS^ZSZSS 

to planting protective belts of wetland 

Pollution-resistant ground cover, 
traffic-reducing train schedules and 
training programs for hotel 
here on waste-reduction methods are 

5.5 billion 

Deutsche marks ($3.17 
sewage and water-treatment facilities 
alone? A good portion of tins money* 
of course, has returned to Baden 
Wurttemberg. . _ ... 

The state’s engineering 
its 1.000 companies and 100,000 
employees, has provided everything 
from gas-fired electricity generating 
stations to the sensors implanted m the 
. lake bottom. 



‘Hidden Champions 
Have High Impact 


V’Vj 


■■ ; 





Houses built on stilts on the shore of Lake Constance, a 
favorite tourist destination. 


Baden-Wurttemberg 

has so many small, low- 
visibility, market-domi- 
nating companies that 
analysts have come up 
with a generic term tor 
them: “hidden champi- 
ons,” 

Like most of the srate s 
340.000 small and medium- 
sized companies, the names 
of these several hundred 
companies, all with annual 
turnovers of 500 million 
Deutsche marks l$289 mil- 
lion) or less, are by no 
means household words. 
Their products, however, 
are a common part ot 
everyday life. 

If a skating nnk. train sta- 
tion or office-building 
entryway happens to feature 
an exceptionally wide span 
of steel girders and stints, 
chances are it came from 
Stahlbauwerk Muller 
Offenburg (SMO) GmbH 
& Co. KG. Its number-one 
area of business is gas sta- 
tions - “nearly all of those 
in southern Germany and 


most of those in Eastern 
Germany,” according to the 
Stiddeutsche Zertung. 
SMO, founded in 
recently recorded an 18 per- 
cent rise in annual sales. 

To unwrap a consumer or 
pharmaceutical product is to 
encounter the work ot 
Gerhard Schubert GmbH s 
machines. Using state-of- 
the-art CNC (computer 

numerically controlled) 
technologies, this 

Crailsheim-based compa- 
ny’s systems package and 
wrap products. Its success 
in selling its systems to 
such corporate giants as 
Johnson & Johnson. 
Bahlsen and Jacobs 
Suchard has given the com- 
pany a 10 percent rate of 
profitability and a 15 per- 
cent rise in annual sales. 

New from the company is 
the “picker.” This highly 

maneuverable assembly- 
line robot can grasp and 
transport up to 250 items 
cookies, for instance - a 
minute. 





Top Design Firms 
Serve the Globe 


Alb 




tv 


3: * 


* 


In another state the 
news might have cre ated 
more of a stir: frogdesign, 
located in Altensteig, on 
the eastern flank of the 
Black Forest, was named 
“Germany’s design team 
of the year” for 1993- . 

The news coincided with 
another coup: frogdesign 
was also selected to design 
a corporate package and an 
“infbrmaior" (an ultra-small 
“bathtub television ) for 
RTL, Germany's most suc- 
cessful broadcaster. 

But for a number di rea- 
sons, the official communi- 
ty, design trade- reporters 
and the general public treat- 
ed these events as a matter 
. of course. Prog«tesig» hM 

made a habit of vanning 

awards - 300, according to 
the company’s latest connt 


- and contracts. Its list of 
clients includes Toyota, 
Panasonic. Yamaha, Apple, 
Eastman Kodak and 
Hewlett-Packard. 

The . truth is that success- 
ful designers have become a 
staple 1 of Baden-Wflr- 
ttemberg. Slany Design and 
Moll Design had preceded 
frogdesign to the winner s 
circle in recent years. 
According to a recent esti- 
mate by a Mumch-based 
industrial designer, “Fully 
half of Germany’s interna- 
tional designers are tesed m 
Baden-Wfirttemberg. 

These companies have built 
up a stable of international 
-cliesas: Sony’s raw line or 
■ radios and- the new logo tor 
Philips are just two exam- 
ples oftheir work. • 

Nor do the state’s design 



^^^eering machine for AT&T one of many 
international clients. 


efforts . go exclusively 
abroad - quite the opposite. 

; Those who don’t have an 
eye for a snazzy telecom- 
munications console or an 
elegant satellite antenna 


may appreciate a few of 
Baden-Wtirttemberg s other 
design masterpieces. 
Porsche and Mercedes- 
Benz sports cars, Vitra 
chairs and Boss suits. 


There are a number of 
uplands in Central 
Europe. The most impos- 
ing and famous are, of 
course, the Alps and their 
individual ranges. 

The Schwabische Alb (lit- 
erally, “Swabian Upland”) 
extends 200 kilometers to 
the northeast from tel arger 
Swiss namesakes. While die 
Alb’s highest peak reaches 
1,000 meters, its nse from 
the Danube and Neckar val- 
leys is often gradual and 

wayward. . , 

Its peaks do provide a 
number of highly visible 
prominences. Although 
only 850 metere high, the 
fortress of Hohenzollem 
dominates the landscape for 
miles around, a majestic 
reminder of its iron-willed, 
iron-nerved dynasty- ^ 

1 5th century, the Honen- 
zollerns took a very large 
gamble. They swapped their 


family trove, acquired 
through centuries of penuri- 
ous parsimony, for the 
rights to a half-civilized 
half-waste “march of land 
- the Mark Brandenburg - 
including its village capital: 
Berlin. 

While Berlin and the rest 
of Germany have become 

highly urbanized high- 
powered entities, the Alb 

has stayed much the way it 

was: an area of uncluttered 
landscapes and wonderful 
rib-sticking food. In English 
and in German, “down 
teams up naturally with 
“home” and its various 
delights, as in * down-home 
cooking." For hundreds of 
thousands of campers, 
returning sons and daugh- 
ters and other visitors, up 
_ as in “up on the 
Schwabische Alb” - is the 
way to go for an old-fash- 
ioned kind of rural home 



Vie Schwabische Alb has retained much of its historic 
wilderness. 



Great Global Connections 


today’s goods, money and capital 
cross almost any border.Those who 
want to be successful in the big mar- 
kets have to have the best f 1 
connections. This includes 
hand information and pro! 
knowledge of domestic and intemar 

tional markets. Sue 

its subsidiaries will connect you 
directly with all the important eco- 
nomic centers in the wor^ l^ted 

n .1 Panwonu 





f ? 


inS< 

is ri< , 

savin g* banks in the 
Wurttemberg but a] 
major commercial l ... 

mestic and international Activities. 

And it can do a lot for 7 
Just get in touch wit 
head offices: Sudwestj 
sdilagerstriasse 
Germany, and Sudw 
staanlage 33, ^8165 
Germany. Or give us 
Stuttgart (+49) .(711. 

Mannheim (+49) (62 


425 

325 


RRUSSELS 

DUBLIN 

ISTANBUL 

T 7 mR 

COPENHAGEN 

madrTd 

MI LAN 
PA RIS 
V IENNA 
B UDAPEST 

kTev 



S 4 

Tm~ 

TTT 

T30~ 

T 5 T 

"TUT 

~378~ 

224 

'085 

109 


ROTTERDAM 

Tokyo 

"WARSAW 

TlON G^KONG 

Tondon 


N EW YORK 
I urTch 

"M OSCOW 

TraguL” 


Sudwest LB 

Sudwestdeutsche Landesbank 


** '• • ' s 

rJ£ 


1 




I 


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is h« 
tion 
tioo 
lead 
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potf 

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lo i 
sine 
resif 

ter I 

his i 

the 

spoi 

Her 

Eco 

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din ■ 
men 
reas. 
busi 

cert; 

Rui 

"wo 

fi< 

radi- 

amo 

last 

eloci 

govt 


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duri 
son' 
vice 
rela 
0 
pie 
con- 
oca 
kite 
and 
toili 
pie 
or J 
bou 
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ope 
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ore 

end 


Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 1994 


. * 


)r 


MUTUAL FUNDS 


Clo&q of (nidirtg Friday, Jwiso im 


Cm Moms VfVty 
RJNoirw Lad dm 


AAL Mutant 
Banda 10.44 
CaGrp IS. IB 
MunBdp 1102 +4S 
SmCDSIk 11.16 *-.10 
AARPlimfc 
CaoGtn 3402 -IJ5 
CMeMn 1S-87 + .0* 
Ctwlncn Jim *24 

HO Ban 16J7 -JM 
TxFBtln 1071 -.15 
AST Funds: 

Emergp 1SJ1 +.17 
FLHl HUB *JH 
fi-TF 1141 *m 
Gwtttinp 1 170 *sn 
Utaincp 1U1 -.1? 
AFLBCnonlOja *JJ7 
AHA Funds: 

Baton n 1150 -79 
FuU JO 79 ~sa 
Um 10X0 -ill 

Aim Fuads: 

AiftGvn 9.87 *41 


25.18 *22 
1629 *22 
9JJ *M 
ia m *25 
10.12 -in 

71 .91 +.13 
1025 + 45 
1024 *45 
841 *45 
1140 + .15 
10.16 *02 

BM * 05 
1009 *.13 
1122 + 75 
11.09 -04 
13.93 *28 

13.92 *27 
3127 *25 
212B *25 
1723 *22 


►.02 


Asrsup 
BriAp 
Choi a 
ConStlp 
CaScp 

Grrno 

HYldAP 
HYMBt 
InCDB 
tnttE p 

LimMP 
MuBp 
SumtniJ 
TeCTp 
TFW 

uwp 
inas i 

VotuBI 
Value 
Wring a 
AMF Ponds: 

AdUUitg 9.99 
InfMrpn 9.99 
InflLian 10.3? 
MMSocn 11.11 *21 
ARK Funds: 

CoPGrn 11.02 -42 
Grtncnn 1025 + 43 
Income 10.19 *j ) 7 
ASM Fdn 1027 -44 
Accessor Funds: 
IrrfFxinn 1221 * 06 
ACCMortglTJQ -25 
SWIhfFx 1240 *JJ3 
Acorn In 1641 • .05 
AcmFd 1325 *.09 
AcbnCap 22.11 *21 
APvCBalP 1025 + 47 
AdvCRrtp 1024 *27 
Adwea Advent 
Gov! re 1027 -.13 
Gwlhnp 1748 *24 
HY BOP 923 +43 
Incqie 1326 +.14 
MuBdNoflOJt +48 
Spctnp 21J6 *46 
Aetna Funds 

Aetna n 10.98 +43 
Bond n 1020 +44 
Grvrinoo 1129 +46 
imtGrn UJ8 +46 
Afger FUads: 

Growth I 2127 +.19 
IncGrr 1325 + 23 
AWCaGT 1(242 +47 
5tnOoo I 2322 —.13 
ABanceOv: 

AiatcoD 749 +46 
Solan p 1437 +.09 
BohmBl 1541 +.16 
BonaA P 1547 -.12 
Canodap 5.92 —48 
Cnsn/lnv 11.11 +44 
CPBaBa 1547 +.12 
CPBdCp 1547 +.12 
Court! p 1842 -.14 
GtaSAp IZ46 —46 
Govt A P 841 +43 
GovW p 841 +43 
GovtCP 841 +43 
Groined 245 - 42 
GwthFp 2525 +20 
GwthBt 7122 +.17 
246 +42 
1021 +49 
1021 +49 
1021 +49 


1749 +44 
927 +43 
927 +43 
927 + 43 


Gr1ncfl P 
InMAp 
inSMuS 
irsmcp 
I ndAP 
MrtuAp 
MngBP 
MrtgCP 
WBgTrAp 9.93 
MigTBp 9.93 
MlpTrCo 9.93 
MMG 1023 + 43 
MMnl 148 - 

MMSAP 8.94 
MMSBt 844 
MCAAp 10.91 +49 
MuCA B plO.91 +49 
MuCA C pi 821 +49 
MuFLCp 1024 -.10 
ICATA 13.94 +49 
MullCAB 1325 +48 
MINBP 1024 + 48 
MUOHCP1024 -49 
MuNJCp 1034 +47 
MNYA 10.17 +48 
MuNYBp 10.17 -46 
MuNYCp 10.17 +44 
NMuAP 10.94 +40 
NBMuCp 10.94 -48 
NEiiTAp 1249 -.19 
NAGvA 1028 - 

NAGwfSp 1028 
NAOvC 1027 - 

PrGf1hApl259 +21 
PrGrthBplZfl +20 
QusrA p 24.10 -.15 
STMMp 922 
STAMbt 922 - 

TWlP 2740 —20 
Wldlnco 1.90 
AmSoutt Funds: 
Batanc* 1225 + 48 
Bond 1129 +45 
Eauitv 1524 +.13 
Gvtm 9.91 +42 
LidM® 1072 +44 
ReuEa 1729 —0! 
Amonabic 1X67 +44 
Ambassador Fds 
Bdhtf 1042 +44 
BcndF 1021 +45 
QGrtn 1728 - 48 
CoreGrF 1728 - 48 
GrowlhF 14.11 -47 
Growth/ 14.1) +4> 


Grp Name wWv 

MNomo Lost Chge 


TxEIBp 1123 +43 
TXMSAp 1043 +44 
American Funds: 
Amflrip >240 +44 
Anxsa 1110 +.13 
AmMuHp22J9 +.19 
BoMFdo [440 + 45 
C0PmBlp3446 +21 
CopWIpp 1646 
CaoWGr 1852 
Euaacp 2224 
Fdktvp 1841 
GcVJP 1451 
GwtnFd P 2726 
HITrsip 1529 
InCOFdP 1459 
InlSdp 1427 
InvGoAP 1924 
LtdTEBd 14J9 +.08 
NwEcano31J5 +.17 
NewPerp 15J4 +.u 
SmCnWo2443 + 45 
TiixEkatBl2x7 +.08 
TxExCApl6J7 +49 
TxEiMOPl643 +.10 
TxExVAp 165) +49 
VKshMutP 18,15 +,J7 
AroGwtn 1006 +21 
AHerttan 153 +42 
AmerNatt Funds: 
Growth 426 + 43 
income 21.94 +.14 
Trifle* 1546 +.07 
API Gr fpn 1346 + 44 
Am Pertornt 
Band 1004 +44 
EawtV 1247 +.12 
intBd 1086 +42 
AmUtlFdn 22.95 +20 
AmwyMPtf 7.90 +41 
Analytic n 1225 +.12 
AnchCapf 2046 —20 
Auudo Fund* 

AZTF 1141 +46 
CO TF 1083 +47 
HI TF 11.90 +46 
KYTF 1057 +J5 
NronsJTF la® +.09 
ORTF 11.00 +48 
Arcb Funds 
Sal 1021 +42 
Em Grth 1248 —46 
GovCorp 1065 +44 
GroJnc 1119 +46 
MoTF 1150 +47 
US Gov 1149 +44 
Armstnsn V.0I +.11 
ArfantM3rpil49 +43 
Allas Funds: 

CaMuni 1146 +48 
CAlns tflJ7 
GvtSec 1049 +43 
Grainc 1455 +.15 
NaMuni 1122 +47 
BUT Funds: 

G-roincT nli53 +48 
IrtfGovTfT [028 +43 
SIGavTn 1022 +42 
BEA Funds 
EMfcEf 2556 +.13 
UfflEfl 2076 +.10 
SiaFxm p I7J8 +46 
BFM5hDufi?5B +41 
BJBGIA p 1221 —43 
BJBIEqAP 1551 +.06 
BNYNamBwc 
Ealncn 1142 +45 
IrdGavt 1023 
NYTEn 1044 +44 


BondLn 144 +41 
Bond Sr 1038 +42 
Entwp2nl75S +.13 
Entran 1647 —.19 
Gwtn n 1X34 +.12 
Inn I6J8 +.16 
Shadow n 1240 +41 
TaxFfSn Il.ro *05 
TaxFrt. n 9J6 -47 
UMBBn 1151 +42 
UMSHrrn 943 
U MB Sin 1641 +41 
Value n 2622 +24 
BaamSBMd&fCalMK 
Diversa n 1350 +47 
hrtiEan 648 + 45 
InUFln 1049 + 44 
BaM Funds 
Adilnc 9.93 
BIChtPP 1846 -44 
DM3evp2348 —43 
BakrGvn 
Baalun Trash 
tnstAMgi 1016 +44 
InStEan 1097 +49 
InvimTF 1044 +45 
InvtntEa 1357 +.17 
InvUtln 1073 +.15 
BaanAstn2143 +29 
Bartled Funds: 
BosCVln 1573 +21 
FUtedin 1037 +.04 
Vllrtt 1249 +.14 
BascomBai2244 +.16 
BarFundsinslt 
STYleW 955 - 

Bond n 1024 +44 
EauttV 11.13 +49 

BOYFukU iBVWfc 

STyieldn 955 - 

Bortdn 1024 +44 
11.13 +49 
3148 +.18 
1142 - 




7223 -.11 
1444 -.14 
1015 -44 
10.15 +44 
1404 +.14 
SmCoGF 1427 -.13 
TxF&Xn 1066 +46 
Amcor, Vintage: 
Equity 1062 -42 


UsSflcF 

WEIKF 

IntSdF 

liUBdln 

IrtlSlkl 


BOksicea 1048 +45 
BandAn 2048 +42 
DhrGrAn 1141 +46 
EohtaAn 11,18 +.11 
FocGrA 1095 +.12 
ShIDur 1004 _ 

SUJdAn 2039-43 
SmCWA 1149 +47 
USGvA 2011 —43 
USTIdxA n20!7 +43 
Bonham Grow* 
AcfiGavn 9.85 - 

CoTFln J147 +45 
CaTFlnn 1053 +48 
CaTFSn 1038 +42 
CafTFHn 948 +47 
CarrFL.nn74 +49 
EaGron 1223 +.17 
EurBdn 1047 +48 
GNMA n 1080 +41 
Goldin n 1343 -41 
fricGron 1522 +.7? 
LTreasn 1044 -.10 
NITFln 1120 +4* 
WTFLh 1219 +48 
STT>easnlO04 +41 
Tcrl995 n 9524 +.11 
Tar20C0nntt2 -49 
Tar2005 n 5243 -71 
TqrtOIOn 38.96 -46 
TdrfOTJ n 2925 +52 
Tar2020n2041 -25 
TNaien 1059 -43 
Utmaaan 7032 +20 
Berger Group: 

100 on 17.06 +48 


Fxinco 1025 _ 101 pn IZ09 -47 

IntdtTFx 1055 - 43 j BemsMii Fds 


Amer AAdvanc 
Salon n 1359 - 46 
Equity n 1424 -.10 
IfiHEaty n 1246 -.10 
LtdTrm n 1047 -41 
AmerCa(0i± 

CiralAo 1643 - 20 
CmsJfip 1843 
CpBffla 724 
CorpBdAp7J6 -44 
EGA e 26.13 +.12 
EmGfBP 2570 -.11 
ErrtAo 1254 -.13 
EnTSo 1250 -.13 
E«rvlncAp540 - 46 j 
EalncBt 543 -.06] 
EjcchFd 11349 - 28 


Gv5hDunl271 +43 
ShfOurn 1371 +43 
mrOurn 1344 - 47 
CaMun 1346 +45 
CMvMunn (377 * 45 
NVHAunn 1377 -.05 
inflVtfln 1624 - 22 
Berwyn Fdn 1068 -20 
Berwyn Inc nl)J7 -45 
Bt6rudMCG1146 —41 
BOtmora Fuads: 
Botonoed 1056 +46 
Eouav 1062 *45 
EoJndeit 1040 -49 
rwedme 1041 +44 
STFixlnc 9.91 -.01 
SCMuni 1121 +45 


GraName Wkty 
Ft} Name Last ou» 


strarBatK P.W—m 
Brinson Funds: 
Brlrand 11140 +45 
firbisGTB MOJO . 

Nusenv 1044 

Bmdywnn 3553 +74 
Bruce n 11 STS +41 
BomduSI n 1043 + 42 
Bui & Bear Cp: 
FWnp 

GWnc np* 1047 — 41 

GakJlrw np 1 7.92 —22 

GovKecnpl546 +.03 
MiHnCP 17.79 +.12 
QuadhpMJi *17 
SpEqp 2349 + 20 
USOvsnp 851 +45 
flumhemp21JJ +.10 
C&5RMVn 3225 +48 
CFB Mari w CWmcte 
Eauitv 102) +48 
FMnc 1007 +42 
IniFxln 1020 +44 
VAMuSd HUB +46 
CCM Funds: 
CcFOavn2945 —20 
PuStncn 1130 *.10 
Mufln 2941 +.19 
Ccrimwp 14.14 -48 
CA TFln 7081 -48 
Ca&fornia Trust 
Callnc n 1325 +.14 
CoWSn 11J4 +.17 
S&P50Un 1145 +.11 
S&PMid 1248 +.17 
Ccdvert Group: 

Ariel 3026 +.16 
ArielAp 22.92 +4S 


Grp Name Wkty 
FONomv L a* am 


GUI 

GfcDivt 

F*dSecl 

HtthScf 

HMdfJC 

MuAZt 

Iritmdr 


920 +.03 
1140 +49 
9.9* +.04 
1146 +21 
7.90-45 
1140 +48 
10.19 -44 


GfctJ&j 

incp 

MSCAJ 

Munlnt 

SecUip 

3ocBd 

SocEa 


1804 +25 
17.99 +.03 
1061 

10.49 +41 
3078 + 19 
P.17 

2228 +23 

TxFLtdh 1072 —42 
TxFUtg 1726 + 41 
TkFVT 16,75 +42 
USGov 1520 +42 

Can bridge FOk 

COPGrA 1529 +.12 
GvtnA 1346 
GwthA 1642 +.13 
MuincA 1648 +.12 
CopGrBt 1527 +.12 
GvlnB 1 1348 
GwthBt 1649 +.13 
IncGrGt 1572 +.13 
MuIncBt 1009 +.11 
CopMkldxnll44 +.10 
CoPilnlEa n 1046 +.09 
CopOoiFIn 1060 +46 
CoppMEGnl321 +.08 
CopPfeHJfl (016 +.17 
ComMt Group: 

Fund SW 1845 —.13 
Gvffnc 443 + 01 
MedRs 2043 +26 
NJonvt 649 —.16 
US Trend 13.97 +.13 
CortSooi FomBy: 
AooGtti 10.40 —41 
Botanced 1021 +44 
Fund 1349 + 44 
GovtOMig 153 
CorflCa 1325 +47 
CameflOTTE 1042 _ 

CnKBIA 1546 +.15 
CnKBiB 1543 +.14 
CflritumGP 921 +43 
CntryShrn 2429 -22 
ChCapBC 1142 +.13 
ChesGrth 1342 +22 
CHesna N6.14 +48 
aUcMaw nl4524 +.17 
OiubbGrln 1745 +.16 
Chubb TR 1526 +.10 
Clipper n 5175 + 7.12 


IntEqtp 1943 +29 
CoTTEA 746 +JB 
Con TEA 749 + 45 
FedSec 1126 +45 
FLTEA 7.92 +45 
FunUA 144 +49 
GnwthAP 1426 +.17 
HTYldA 746 +43 
mcomeAp 679 +43 
mtGTA 1047 
MATxA 8.13 +.06 
MI TEA 724 +45 
MIN TEA 747 +43 
NalftesA 1251 —48 
NY TEA 750 + 45 
OtlTEA 747 +45 
SmSHcp 17.93 -44 
SirtlncA 749 +42 
TxExAp 14.19 +49 
TxlnsAp 058 +45 
USGrA 1229 +.11 
USGvA 640 +41 
UNAp 1349 +26 
CATEB1 746 +45 
CTTEBt 749 +45 
Fedscflf 1126 +45 
FUTxBI 752 + 45 
FundBt 843 +48 
GiEqB 1250 +.14 
GwthBt 1431 +.18 
HYMllBt 1060 +45 
HYSecBt 7.06 +43 
IncomeB 679 
WGrB 1046 - 

MATXBI 8.13 -41 
NelResB 11250 -48 
NYTxfll 75D +45 
747 + 45 
749 +42 
1*19 -49 
858 -45 
1222 -.11 
*80 +41 
1349 + 26 
Funds 

.... 01828 +.10 
CaroSkn ISJO +.10 
Fixed n 1357 + 46 
Govt 829 +4) 
Grth n 2746 +41 
InttSlkn 1322 -20 
Mumn 12L77 +44 
SpMn 2016 +49 
Common Sense: 

Gavf 1722 +44 
Grolnc 1626 +.18 
Growth 1574 +.18 
MunB 1*15 +45 
Compass CapOub 
Efltylnat X12.95 +48 
F«Un* 1095 +41 
Growth 1144 -.13 
inttEfl 1376 -49 
InWFI 7052 -47 
MunSdx 11.14 +45 
NJMunx 1143 -44 
Shrffnfx 106) —42 
CWu pesi te Grow* 
BaSIkP 1226 -47 
Growth P 1243 -47 
IncaFdp 944 -45 
MW 50 P 1449 - 43 
TaxExo 8.10 -46 
USGovo 1059 -44 
Conestoua Funds: 
EouilY 1527 - 20 
Flxedlnc 10JBD +45 
UdMO> 1084 -4} 
CDnn Mutual: 

Govt* 1143 -41 
Grwtti 1543 -.19 
Income x 9.9c —42 
Tomer 1449 +.13 


LMMurt 1036 *43 
MuCA I 11.16 *49 
MUFLI 1124 +49 
MU Nil 11.13 -46 
MuOHp 1120 +49 
AAuHPAt 1121 +48 
NYTxFt 1240 -48 
N7R51 1J.94 — 43 

PoeGrl 2119 *25 
PrcMt 1241 — 98 
Premier p 9.M -42 
SelMiiP 1351 +48 
ManoBedtll.il +45 
STUSp 1030 
smut 1520 -48 
TaxE* 1169 + 47 
USGvtl 926 *02 
UHrt 14A5 +25 
VolAdl 2046 +.14 
WWncx 927 — J» 
WIdWdt 1925 + 23 
TCBalc 1024 +45 
TCCort 1194 +46 
TCInco 1053 +.03 
TCLott 1571 +48 
TCNirtixlSLUS 
TCSCpt 1047 -.13 
CM Groins* 

Oetwri 1B71 -.14 
Dtepl 2640 +.12 
DKhl 7.18 + 4S 
TsyRsl 945 +41 
DNawartGroap: 

Trend P 1446 +42 
Value n 2082 
Dwicopp 24 W +.11 
Dedrl 16.92 +.13 
DeObrllp 1313 +48 
Detaw 0 1871 +.14 


Grp Nome WUy 

FtiName Lastcboe 


WVTxFl 1020 +49 
EdtoEati 13 JO +49 
Emerald Fundsi 
EmEat 111B +.18 
BnrtdUS 1072 +.03 
FLTE 1154 +49 
EmoBtd 1870 +.12 
Endow 1755 +.10 
Enterprise Grown 
CapApp 3319 +52 
GvSeCP 1251 +43 


Gwttinp 

Grtncp 

HYBdP 

tntlGrP 


843 +.07 
1814 +59 
1146 +.06 
1742 +.13 


1225 +41 
7.18 +45 
8.89 +43 
945 +41 
1272 + 43 
1145 +44 
+ 42 


lntlEq b 
Ddchp 
USGovtp 
Trocsp 
TxUSo 
Txlnsu 
TkFtPop 841 
HneasionalFdK 
USLTO 1421 +.13 
USSnU 870 +47 
US 6-10 n 11.95 +.03 
Jccxsin 2243 —.18 
UK n 2523 +.16 
Contn 14J2 +22 
Rxdn 10244 +47 
GIBd 10646 +.13 
Govt n 106.7D +23 
MGv 115.75 +49 
InttHBM 11.18 +.15 
LCaoitti 1225 +44 
PocRIm 1748 —.17 
USU1V0I 1143 +.18 
USSmVal 1174 +.05 
nortpeffOii 
Britain 4756 +27 
income n 1109 +46 
Stock n 5552 +25 
OamSoCfol 1168 +.16 

Dremai Funds 

Contro 1424 + JO 
HRtn 1621 +26 
SmCPVrinl]50— 41 
Oreyftn: 

A Bono n Has +.10 
Aureenp 1126 +.10 
Asset All n 1398 +48 
Bolncd 1357 + 45 


CriTxn 
Caflntn 
CTlnin 
Dreylus 
ErEHnd 
FI. Iran 


1559 +49 
1448 +47 
1346 +44 
1358 +.15 
1142 +22 
13.M +46 



GNMArplS29 +44 
GnCA T42I +49 
GMBdR 15.92 +.10 
GNY p 2128 +.12 
Grtncn 1749 +49 
GwthOpn 1052 — 41 
lnsMunnpl927 +.16 
tatermn 1471 +46 
interEap 1574 +47 
InvGNn 1557 *43 
AAA Iran U44 +46 
AAA Tax n 1727 +.10 
MunBdn 1355 +48 
NJ Inin 1445 + 46 
NJAAunn 14.14 +47 
NwLdY 3478 +21 
NYrrxm 12.14 *48 
ISIY Tax n 1624 -49 
NYTEp 1842 +.08 
PooPlndl 1626 +.14 
PeaAAid rnl757 + 22 
ShlnGvn 1129 . 

STIncpn 13M +42 
ShlnTo 1324 +42 
ThdCntrn 850 +42 
USTmt 1359 +44 
USTLng 15.92 +.14 
USTShn 15L7S —41 
Dreyfus Comstock: 
COPValA 1172 —21 
OlpV[XBtll5» — 21 
PSMAP 972 —49 
972 -+.10 


PIStBVOt 

Dreyfus Pn 


CAMIM1A1344 +49 
CTAAuA 1374 +46 
CopGth 1654 +48 
FLAAunA 1553 +.09 
GtalnvA n16JQ +.16 
GUnvBt 1620 +.16 
GnmaA 14.93 +43 
GnrnaBt 14.94 -43 
MAMonA)257 -46 
MDMU1AT351 +47 
AAlAAunA 1637 +48 
AANAAW1A1557 -49 
AAUBdBt 15.13 +.10 
MunffldA 1513 +.10 
NCAAuA 1447 +.10 
NCAAuB1 1446 +.10 
NYMUHA1S22 +.10 
NYAIuBt 1523 +.10 
OHAAuA 1357 +47 
PA MatA 1728 +.11 
PA MuSt 1727 +.71 
TXAAuA 2311 -.17 
VAAAuA 1755 +.11 
PreyimSr r o tep i c 
Growth p 38.11 —.17 
Income 0 14.90 -48 
Inv A 2125 +47 
InvBr 2248 -46 
WWInvp 3621 +52 
OnmeeMiituat 
IntGovn 1079 +43, 
KYTFn 777 - 42 ! 
KY5MM 522 +41 
EBiFondS: 

Equity p 60.99 -29 
Fkpcp 55.12 -27 
Income BX4840 —46 
Eriua Voice: 

CKnaP 1623 +41 
EV St* 1277 -48 
Growth 0 823 - 49 
mesas P 872 + 45 
MatOd 1059 * 48 
STGWt 956 
STTsv P 5559 -44 
SPcEqro 350 -44 
TrcdGv: 1120 +01 
Trpdlnvp 726 + 46 
TrodToll p 8.84 -.17 


TEinCP 1427 
EOvStn 33J6 + 1-M 
E v er green ForaH: 
Evrpm n )A2S +24 
Foundn 1329 +.10 
GtoRsn 1466 
LTdAAWn 2254 +.72 
AAunCA n 1054 + 43 
AAuriFn 1051 +43 
AAurilna n 10.92 +48 
Rattren iijo +47 
TotRtn 19.56 +49 
VriTmn 1576 +.14 
ExcelAAUte 420 —11 
ExIrrvHI p 7.99 +43 
F AM Vein 2023 
FBI. series: 

Bldvat 1951 +.19 
Growth! 1352 
HRGrBdt 1020 +41 
HtYBdt 1078 +42 
Monodt 1321 1 44 
FFB Lexicon: 

CopApp x r,; fit +.12 
Fxdinx 1059 +41 
intGvx 1058 —42 
SriVduepU.97 +49 
FFBEq 10.98 +49 
FFBNJ 1122 +47 
PFTW Funds: 
inHHdB 1026 —45 
US5hort 9.90 
WWHetibiai2 +41 
WWFxflBnI047 — 41 
FMB Funds 
DivECo 1142 +43 


DivEI 

tntGCP 

lntGl 

IWTFp 

AAiTFI 


1142 +43 
1043 +.03 
1023 +43 
iaaa +46 
1040 +.06 


FFA Funds 
Capit 2526 +44 
Newtnc 1048 +42 
Pnrmm 1443 +48 
Rerun 27-36 +48 
Fainnin 2431 +.17 
Fascianon 17.97 +.13 
FMerrietfFtaKfB 
ArmSSpn 9.90 
Arm I n 940 
ExcnFan 73.84 +48 
RsttSri 1078 +41 
FSTlisn 9-08 
FOfiOn 2455 *43 
FHYTn 956 +44 
FITlSq 1021 +41 
fit 55 p 1021 +4( 
FsiaHSn 1026 +42 
FSiohtMpl026 +42 
FSTrt 2628 
FST1SSP 948 
GnmatSnU55 +43 
GnmaSp H55 +43 
RflTSSp 1078 +41 
1MTIS 11.10 +45 
MmCW (317 +.(( 
Minicap n 1316 
SritTerm 1027 
USGosrfn 1071 
SBFAn 1740 
Fidetay Advisor: 
EqPGfl 2»74 
EqPlnc 1575 + 20 
GtalRasc 1777 + 48 
Gov tap 9.94+46 
GrwOopp26T9 +24 
HI Map 1279 +.10 
HTYWen 1307 +4S 
IncGip 1578 + 46 
Ltd TER Pi 054 +47 
LMTBR M20 +4< 
LMTEI 1 054 +47 
OvseaP 1353 +.tl 
STRIP 10.12 
StmsOpP 2046 +21 
PldeBy InstDqfc 
Eri*Gln 29.93 +.19 
EdPHn 1545 +21 
IShlGv 9.W +42 
LfSln (121 +44 
FWeStv Invest: 
AurTFm 1250 +49 
AAAorn 1578 +.10 
AMtsrGrnl446 +.11 
AMortnn 1 171 +45 
Bakmc 1554 +4J 
BkwCh 2540 +.15 
CA Iron 11.1s +49 
CA TF n 1350 +.10 
Canaoan 1879 —20 
COPAPP 1759 +27 
CmbiearrltLae +43 
ConarSinl5179 +24 
Contra 3155 +.11 
CnvSecn 1676 + 49 
Desttnyl 1771 +.17 
DesKnyll 2850 +20 
DfeEq 1192 +28 
DtverlniimziB -.13 
DivCIhn 1221 +41 
EmOGrorl75* ~v01 
EmrAAKt 1843—47 

1774 +.16 
»14 +21 
ExehFd nl0355 +53 
FidelFdn 19.90 +.16 
11X91 +47 
1095 +44 
1259 +41 
1354 +.11 
1047 +45 
2958 +21 
2388 +.18 
. 1342 +.10 

InsAAunn 1255 +49 
IntBd n 1086 +44 
Intertjvtn 9.91 +42 
taOGrl n 1849 + 20 
IrrvG&n 7.97 +44 
Japan n 1227 —42 
LaflnAm n 1 7.1 1 —44 
LMMop 1006 +47 
LawPrr 1841 +45 
Ml TF n 1255 +.11 
MINTFn 1150 +4* 
Maoellan 73.10 +.15 
AAktlndnr3SJ4 +21 
VAATFn 1121 +48 
AMueSecnl07S +44 
AAUhCPln 875 +47 
AIY HYtl 1345 +.10 
NYlnsn 1220 - 47 
NewMWnil52 +.14 
NewAAB 1340 - 03 
2473 -55 
1311 -49 
2851 +2t 
1069 +23 
1627 + 46 
ReaEsfn 1353 +44 
RBtGrn 1826 -49 
SWTBdn 956 —41 
ST tAWn 1020 —.02 
SmaflCcr.1141 -46 
SEAsian 1541 +24 
SiHSlc 1957 +27 


Eoutlnc 

EOH" 

camx 

Europe 


OTC 
OhTFn 
Ovrseo 
PoQBas 
Purflon 


Grp Nome mdy IGroName widy Oro Nome _ 9Wity 
Fd Name Lust One . Fd Nome Lost Qtgej Fd Norne Lai Owe 


Telecom r3B44 +21 
7 rcrnr 2152 -.13 
UtBr 38.12 +55 
Fktttty Spartan 
AgrMun 111053 +47 
CAHYm 1120 +49 
CTHYnr 1170 +49 
FLMum 1153 -49 
GNMA 11 10.18 -44 
Gdvmn 10.80 +46 
Htahlnm 1257 + 45 
InUAunt lOJO +48 
invcrSdnlftM -47 
LtdGv 10-07 + 47 
LTGn 1375 +.12 
MO Mum 1059 *.10 
Aftunlnr 1141 +.10 
NJHYr 1149 -.09 
NYHYm 1127 +49 
PAHYm 1121 +48 
Smincn 9.99 
SlntGvn 9.96 +42 
SmirMunl014 +42 
RduCapn 1959 +41 
nWol Street: 

EuroEq 3256 *20 
PocBsn 4358 +.13 
5m Co 1277 +46 

TxFSi 1137 +42 
RnHorGvl 11.18 +43 
RnHorMu 1158 +47 
Firet ham Funds 
AstAHP 1086 -48 
BCOcxiP 1093 +.03 
Equity P 1651 +.10 
Ecridxo 1144 +.10 
FXdlnCP 1120 
GovBdP 956 —42 
Irfllncp 1040 —41 
Ltainc ifun —43 
MtoSecp 1020 —43 
MunBdo 10.92 -43 
R«uEap 12-38 +.04 
stock 9 1658 + .08 

FstBasIG 9-09 +46 
FstEoulnr 15.90 +26 
FraFdE 1140 +41 
PtHwMu 1152 +46 
Fintlnvntara: 
BIQwpP 1640 +.11 
GfcMP 627 +48 
GavTp 1(59 -44 
Grolnc » 676 + 45 
HtghYdp 528 - 43 
income p 423 +42 
tavGrdD 1056 -45 
LifeBCP 1451 +.09 
LifcHYn 1120 +.04 
USA np 1318 + .18 
AAATFp 1225 +47 
MfTFp 1341 +.13 
NJTFO 1350 *49 
NYTxFr pi 5-34 +49 
PATFd 1124 +.10 
SeecBd 1228 -48 
SpSttP 1858 -.17 
TcwE»>rp 11X62 +47 
TriRelp 1225 + 47 
Utfllnc&p 5 a +49 
VATFp 1314 +47 
FirstAAul 1057 + 45 
Rrst Omaha: 

Equity r» 1040 +42 
Fxrincnxl044 +43 
SFxtanxiau 
FFDvAstP 1327 + 48 
FPTEIntP 1250 +.04 
Ftad Priority: 

EquttvTr n 10J1 +43 
FkdncTr 1056 +43 
UdMGv 1003 +42 
first Union: 

BafT n 1336 +.08 


AAussTF 1305 >4J: EmsGr pn1545 +.U 
MiCbTxF 1256 + 47 Govtpri 1052 +45 
AANtaS 1253 -46 1 Grlnep 1472 +49 
MOTF 1226 +47 IntFfln 1396 +21 
tsuTF 1112 -48; MJdcnpn 1447 +.19 
NYlns 1175 -48 1 Retton r*51.?2 +44 
NY Tax 1251 -48 i Re5rv«wlOJ7 - 
NCTF 1322 -471 Vo*»n 1319 -.II 
OWofTF 1374 - 47 , IBM Motuol Fundt 
ORTF 21.98 +471 LarneC0nl553 +.14 
PocGrwth 1644 -42 AAuUd 1051 +4S 
PATF 10.79 +46 1 SmrilCo nlBJO +.19 
PrnnRJ 629 +42, USTretdtM.95 -41 
PuerTF 1109 -451 Utifitv 1140 +20 
Si Gov 1059 -45 HJEXGreUK 
SmGri>Grl329 *.13> Wax 1956 -23 
TAGuv 10.99 -43 IGtObAp 16.17 +21 
TxAdHY 944 - 03 1 2 GrwAp 1B46 *21 
TXTF It. 96 +46 ; ttuxEx 1172 -46 

USGavSc 7.13 -42 2incPlAp IM2 +47 
UmHtes 1040 -.16 1 ldeX3 1648 -27 
VA TF 1110 +47 JFtXlnAD 976 +47 
Fmkfia AAadTn 1 105 Groups 
CorpQurip2452 -.il' BluCpD 654+48 
lnvGradep929 +42 


RisDIvp 1551 +42 
Frcritln Tempi: 

Gtabi 1353 -.18 
Hard 1362 +47 
Hflnc IU7 +48 
Fre m ont Minds: 
C&ferin 1373 + 47 
Growth n 1158 -.101 
CAint 11.18 +45 
RXKtTrad: L 

Aparastc 1553 +44, 
Groin fp 1616 +48 
Gwtttb 1426 - 45 
Sncotp 1056 + 42' 
MBdTR1pll40 -42 
FUndomoMri RntH: 
CAMunnp 952 -43 
NYMunnpl.I9 -41 ■ 
US Gov n 1.97 —41 1 
GAM Raids: 

Globri 16841-147 
mil 21697 —55 
PacBas 1BBJ0+349 
GEE»«BiSUe [ 
Dhfarstdnl4J8 -.14 1 
Globri n 1697 -20 
Income n 1179 +44 
S6SLnan1174 +44 1 
S&S PMn 3745 +27 | 
TaxEx (336 -.10 
Trusts n 3455 - 52 1 
GEFundv 
GtobriC 1920 -23 
lrtcomeCnll23 +44 
StraaC 1624 -.IB 


Bonap 5.45 +44 
CATEp 558 -43 
□Bp 7.96 +.10 
Dixuvp I2J3 +49 
E<MtPIP 1152 +.09 
Extrlnp 451 +42 
Fedlnc p 5,08 -41 
GtabBdp 622 +42 
GtaGrp 693 +47 
Growth p 1828 +.15 
KfYdTEp *41 +42 
InsrTEP 5.37 +44 
Inn p 1051 +48 
MOdRP 1308 +.10 
M«RS p 559 + 44 
579 +43 
556 +43 
1275 +48 
556 +43 
1445 +.11 
570 +44 


MiCh P 

MNTEP 

MuUp 

NYTEp 

NmOP 

OWop 


PrecMtp 927 +41 
Progresp 686 
Select P 976 +47 
Stock p 2027 +.19 
StrAggt 1542 +.11 


BolCtn 

BriBp 

FxInBp 

FxbiTn 


Streqr 9J9 +47 
Shine t 668 +44 
SkSTt 142 
StrWGt 549 +.03 
TEBndP 422 +43 
Utaincp 695 +.10 
ISI Funds: 

Muni pn 11.13 +47 
NOAmp 1027 + 42 
„ Trap 1025 +45 
USEuOn 1663 -.17 'indOneGT 1027 +43 
GE USE 1663 +.16 I ind e p en dence Cmt 

Opportp 1158 +47 
StafGvfn 1041 —41 
TRBdP 1056 +47 
TRGrp 1255 +.12 
fnvResh 449 +43 
tnvSaOFMct 
CopGrl 1357 +45 
QUaOUc 1456 +.16 
USGVT 1049 +43 
tavucae 

DvnmP UM +.15 


1226 + 48 
12J6 -48 
1058 +.03 
1058 +43 
InsTFCf (125 +45 
huTFBp 1125 +45! 
MnBdTn 1056 +44 
fJCVUOTC 11074 *47 
USGvtfi p 10.11 -43 
USGvtCr 1611 +.03 
Vatueflp 17.93 *48 
VahieCtnl722 -48 
VriueTn 1743 +48 
FhdFtFn 10.14 +44 
FtaginvHioni 
EmGthp 1336 +47 
InfirtP 1059 *44 
hitTrp 1192 -.17 
MMurip 11.13 -47 
QtXdGrp 1242 +41 
Tell ncSh OUTS +.16 
TriRTsvpl02S +45 
Value p 1147 +40 
Flogship Group: 
AATEdp 1153 +48 
AATECp 1152 +48 
AZTE p 1129 +49 
CTTEAO 10.99 +47 
COTEp ia*3 +.08 
FLTEp 1125 +47 
GATEp 1142 +47 
GldRbp 1821 +.19 
InfTEo 1080 +45 
KYTEAp 1158 -47 
KSTEp 1043 +48 


GIT InvsS: 

EdSpen 2158 +43 
HiYIdn 10-96 -.10 1 
TxFrVAnll44 - 48 r 
GT Globed: 

Amerp 1720 .1 

EmMkt 1604 +22 1 
EmAAMS l&OZ +22 f 
Europe p 1150 +.19 I 
EuroB 1124 -.18 . 
GvtncA 1039 . 1 

GvtncB 10.40 -41 
GfincAp 659 *46 
GrincB 459 *46 I 
tfltCf® 2042 +261 
FfilncB 1555 + 44 ( 
FfilrtcA 1557 -43 
HBhCrp 2049 +26. 
inn p 1150 +.18 
irttfB IIJ5 -.18 
Japan p 11.98 +47 I 
LatAmG 25.U -JR 
LpfAmGS 75-10 +42 
PaafP 1554 +21 I 
PatifB 1526 - 20 ; 

srrotAD 1349 +.oj I 
StratB 1349 -.02 i 
TefeB 1754 + 24 
Teteaxn 1/41 -24. 
Wldwp 1841 +23 > 
WidwG 1722 +23 
GabeS Funds 
ABCo 1046 -41 
Asset np 2324 -20, 
CanvScp (145 *OZ‘ 
Eq'nco 11.90 -.11 


GroName 
RjNane Las 


Wtty | GroName 
Okr! Fd Nome Last Otoe 


ExErins 1389 +43 
Fxdtabn 1025 
IdxErin 1122 -48 
MEato 1324 +47 
UMfiflrS 9.93 -JO, 
MedTBn 1050 +42 
MUttura 1048 _ 1 

VWEqfti 1107 *.10 
Keystone 
OfiBlIX (619-43 
CUS82t (692 +44 
CusB4t 558—41 
CinKltx 1044 —44 
CUSKZt 658 +.02 
24,17 +.10 
9J2 +47 
855 +41 
613 +.12 
2650 -.93 
1123 +4* 
616 -46 


CusSlI 

Cussat 

Cus$4t 

Irrit 

KFMf 

TxETri 

TaxFrl 


KtriAMAmrift 
AUlncfP 9.96 +.10 


CAPIF 

CP12B1 

EkiA 

PWA 

FOAA 

GOA 

GvSAx 

HfEGA 

UrtGrA 

lmdAx 

Omtaa 

PrxA 

SKAx 

TxFAx 

WrWBA 

Fhcflr 

FOABI 

GKTper 

GvSBIx 

tmdBhc 


Emgrth pnl313 +44 
Enerwn 1056 +43 
Envtann 753 *43 
Europe n 1329 + 21 
RnSvcn 1627 + 29 
Gotan 606 — .14 
Growthw 521 +44 
HlittScn 3643 -28 
HiYMaP 751 +43 
indlneo npl323 +48 
IrnGov n 1227 +41 
(ndGrii 1642 +.1$ 
Lettaen 2368 
PacBasn 1558 +42 
SeKncmnpdja +42 
TxFreenpl643 +.12 

Teehn 24JM —43 
TotRtn 1046 +.11 
USGovtnp 749 +.05 
UM n 1022 +.17 
VriBl 1757 +20 
InvPfln p iai5 +41 
InvPMY 1342 +45 
tav TrGvtB fKXOd +.04 
HlefFdna 15.17 +43 


Grrelp 1027 +.13 | JP Growth el 724 —41 
Growth np 2X57 -.16 ; JP tnaome 1606 +46 
SriiOtaG 17.92 -49.JPMI«nfc 
Value d 1322 +47 1 Bonan 1048 +43 


Griaxy Funds: 

Asset An H1127 -42 
EqGrth 1422 +47 
EqtVal 1320 -.16 . 
Eoincmnl228 + 42 I 
HlQBd 1140 -44 
IntBd 1665 -44 
kltEQtn 1144 -20 
NYMun 11.17 +48 
STBdn 1621 -42 
SmC0Eqnl255 +49 
TE Bond nil. 13 +-47, 
Gateway Funds ' 

GovtBdn 1052 +42 i 
IndxPtn 1610 -42! 
5WRWG 1458 + 22 


CHversWnllLSt +48 
EmgMkEalOl —47 
InflEqtyn 1032 +4* 
ST Bond n 1040 +41 
8maitCanl692 +45 
SeBrivn 11.19 +46 


Growth 

income 

TaxEx 

TotRtn 


1122 +.10 
1669 +45 
1692 +46 
1696 +45 


LATEp 1122 +47 iGnSecn 1257 + 46 \ 


LltfTEp 1140 +43 
MITE A P 1311 +47 
AAOTEP 1156 +49 
NCTEAp 1687 +46 
NMTEP 1059 +48 
NYTEP 1126 +48 
OHTE ApIlOO *47 
PATEp 1674 +45. 
TrfTEAp 1142 +47| 
UtHAp 1675 +.11 
VATEAP 11.10 -46 
Flex Fuads 
Bondnp 2618 
Gfclnpn 958 —44 
Growth no 1 346 +46 
Mrirfdfpni.® +42, 
Fontaine n 1079 +41 


GtaM Group: 

Erisars 29.99 +50 
GMtFdn 1176 +22 
Gkmnede Funds 
Equity n 1328 +41 
IntGovn 1678 -43, 
tain 1364 - 23 J 


Janas Flout: 

Bakxxed n133S -49 
Enterprn 2140 +.17 
FedTXExn727 +44 
Fbdncn 9.92 -46 
Fundn 1952 +.14 
Grlhlnc lii? +22 
intGvt 616 +41 
Mercury 1347 +.10 
ShTmBdn U2 
Twenn 2550 +50 
Vertrn 4941 *44 
WridW 3607 +54 


Munlnt n 1668 -45|Japarf=dn lljfi +42 
SmCapn 1629 +42 Join Ha* 

OhWinJA 1070 +42 
GeMman Sadis Rniy: 

CaoGr 15.92—43 




Gfebtc 

Grlnc 

lntlEq 

MuniJnc 


p 15JM +.11 
p 2543 +43 
p 17JM +.13 
fiduerp 2950 +25 
GtaGrthp 14.9B +44 
GovTRp 940 +42 
^.03 +23 
697 +46 
1690 +45 


GrwBjp 

HTYIdP 

TFMN 
71= Not 
TFNY 
USGvt 


Perlruu Jrrvsfc 
AdRMx 941 —42 
Bondnc 1619 +41 
GiSm 92) +43 


1613 -43 ( 
1572 +.14! 
17.91 +45' 
14.72 -.10 
1683 -.14 

2043 +46 

OobtmanSoOahat: 
AriGv 947 . 

Gov Aa 9.98 —42 
ShrfTF 1623 +43 
ST GOV 1049 -41 
Gevrit Funds 
EmsjMk 1853 -.13 
GIGvIn 1616 —41 

tattEq 1342 +.11 I 

1)27 -47 ( SmCos 1663 +43! 
1153 + 45 ]GvtEqtvn 2345 -46' 
9.96 +43 i Gnuflsn AAcOamdd: I 
G57Valpn23.il +23/ 
Gavtncp 1356 *41 
OHTFP 1345 +49 
OnpVrip 1859 -47 


1226 +49 

944 +Xff 

Growth o 1754 <■ 48 
IIACpre 1330 -.12 
LTGvAp 684 +42 
MATE! 1255 +48 

:s 

fS^PiSS +47 
ScefEBa 1693 +47 
SpOpsA 848 +.10 
SeeOwB &66 +49 
StrlnctP 740 +42 
TaxEx fp 1151 +47 

k U|MWU|u6 ^ MSlfllX 

j Jicnaxx fTPMJm: 
AvTech 1148 +.10 
EnvniAP 951 +.12 
GDnBr 941 +4) 


Muni net 115* +47 iGHMNTE 1665 -46' 
OHFortP 114* - 44 GHNdTE 1675 -441 
148 nc 1351 -.H GreensprnsM2J -.13; 

44 Wall Ea 650 -41 'Onarriao Funds 


Fonun Funds: 

Imfind 1 a« -46 
InvSlk 254 -49 
MEBnd 1142 -45 
TaxSvr 1077 -.04 
Founders Group; 
Brim 9.10 -.11 


AstAUOC 

GSGWt 

Boncn 

PcrkAv 

Stock n 

TaxEx 

US Gov* 


GlobAa 1372 +47 
GtOOat 1357 +47 
GdrsA 951 _ 

GtabRx 17,17 +21 
G(Tech 1846 +21 
Goto* 1674 -43 
GoWB I 1671 +43 
PocBos 165B —43 
RgBKA 2000 -.15 
RsBKBt 2674 +.18 
1155 - 48 J Hancock Sowrwk 
1555 -.(2 ACfiA 1135 *.12 
AQlBt 1250 +.12 
BclAp 1046 + 45 
BriBp 1046 +45 
BcndAtP 1548 + 46 
InvAp 155* +.13 


946 

946 -01 
12.93 +.11 
1153 +.10 
1149 — 43 
1926 + 47 

10.18 —42 
2628 +50 
2346 +.14 

955 

1753 —M 
1240 +.10 
852 —.06 
105V +45 
973 +41 
1151 +49 
IUB —43 
19.14 -46 
1618 —41 

956 

PTxFBt 11 JB +49 
STcBT 055 —43 
TxFBfX 1057 -JH 
GlOaCr 1920 +46 
TxF=C« 1059 - 45 
FtxCI 1153 +49 
FOACt 1149 —43 
GvSCht 1618-42 
IrrWCTX 956 
PTxFCI 1240 +.10 
SKO 854 —45 
K3ARF 948 
KrddcrGroufc 
ARMGVA1245 
AstABB (346 +.(( 
EmAAktA 1245 +47 
EmAAMB 1243 +47 
GtaEqBn 1654 *28 
GE£qCn 1657 +29 
GfcEaA 1654 +29 
GOFkG 1255 
GtaFxA 1256 + -05 
GvtAt 1445 *44 
IntFIA 1247 +.05 
KPEI 2440 +.18 
MunffldA 1245 +.11 
SmcapA 1222 +.10 
LAAHn 1841 +45 
Lnndmarit Funds 
Baton n 1459 -45 
EquBvn 1540 -44 
Intincx 1600 +42 
lntlEq IX2S *M5 
NYTF npxll41 +45 
USGvnx 9JS — 41 
LaunfF&nfK 
Brined n 1IX2S +49 
tahnlnn 10J9 +4* 
S8JP5Q0 lOSt +49 
Stock n 1872 +22 
LflbenNY 870 +.05 
LeebPern iaM +46 
Leva Mason: 
AmerLdpl624 +43 
GblGovtpiaSI +47 
Gvtlrtd np 1054 +42 
invGrm 1650 +41 
\vrrFo 1669 +49 
PATF P 1689 +49 
SMnvnp 2359 +53 
TuFrlntp I&67 +44 
TatRetnp 1452 +28 
VaiTrm 1944 +50 
LanhaaianQm 
CnvSecn 1X54 +43 
CL dr 1375 +21 
GNAAAn 040 *JB 
Globri rt 1345 + 46 
Gotdfdn 665 —17 
Gtatacn 1658—43 
Si Govt n 1041 +41 
SIS) 619 — JO 
Stfitv 259-43 
TEBdn 1140 +.10 
WldEm 1604 +.19 
Uberiy Famftn 
AmLdr 1559 +.16 
CapGrApl3J6 +45 
Gal ncA PK1143 +46 
EqlncC 1x1142 +46 
FTiefn 1942 +56 
FTHft 1156 — 42 
HilncBd 1153 +47 
MnSc 1145 +46 
USGvfCp 829 +JB 
USGvSecABJO +4] 
UfiFd 1220 +22 
t 1259 + 22 


NtRsCoWnt51— 19 
TxFBI 1059 +47 
TrtRtl 1549 +.13 
V0II 1546 +.18 
AMPPpers Funds 
CapApn 2546 +24 
SpE«n 3941 +23 
ror 285(7 *.15 
01957 —04 
tntMtgnx2679— 44 
3 Bond x 2(27 —07 
Bond rot 2243 +.19 
MtlEqn 3644 +51 
Mc u l iter F u sds 
Fxdlnc 10.19 
NYTF 11^1 
5TFxlnc 9.92 —.01 
TREg 1112 +47 
MrkTwEq 1028 + 20 
MrfcTwFX 1661 +46 
Manuk Funds 
GvtSecAx 9.98 
GVttaA 1049 + 45 
VriEoA p 1042 +.10 
MoreMFdneiK 

Eqtac 1614 +JJ7 
Gvttncnx 942 —44 
MStfroc 949 -42 
STIncnx 948—43 
StoCk n 1056 +.12 
AMtfhersn 1693—10 
Mcoas Foods 
Equity tpnllB2 +48 
Income f 1143—41 
Prism tor ID. 05 +43 
AAentGtti 1609 +.10 
MentStrn 1695 +48 
MeraerFdPia.12 +43 
Meridian n 2540 +.18 

MenM Lynch: 

AmertnA 1043 +44 
AdKAP 974 
AZAAA 11.18 +48 
BoiA 1257 +44 
BaSVIA 2610 +22 
CAAAA 1632 +49 
CriAMlA 1223 +.10 
CapFdA 2848 +56 
ConsritP 1242 +.17 
CpfXA 855 +43 
mvGdA 1112 +43 
CWTA 1105 +45 
DevCaP 1750 + 45 
DrogA 1758 + 20 
EuTOA 1559 + 22 
FedSecAplOO? +43 
RJAA 1678 +.10 


R1FTA 

GtAIA 

GBdA 

GKVA 

GIHdA 

GiUtA 

GrIRA 

HeritnA 

irsttnp 

mtj&sA 

MIMuA 


Gthtnc 1697 +44 
JfHAAunl 11.19 +49 
TF Bond HUM +.07 
US Gov 941 +43 
UtH 1144 +.12 
LmtTrmp 1617 +42 
UnBrn 27 JO +.17 
LMnrn 2386—49 


n 11.77 +.10 

Growth pnl 358 +44 
lntlEq n 1356 +70 
SmOsn 16*1 +.02 
Lord Abbott: 

AfT3Td p 1689 +43 
BondDri«p9J3 +45 
DevriGth pl661 +49 
Eq1990P 1659 + 44 
FdVriUP 1117 . 

GIEOP 1272 +48 
GUncp 946 +43 
GovtSecpZW +41 
TaxFrp 11.92 +49 
TFCTp 1040 + 46 
TXRCriPllJ7 -.10 
TFFLP 523 +44 
TFAAQp 352 +44 
TFNJp 557 +44 
ToxN Yp 1147 +47 
TFTXp 1073 +48 
TFRAp 558 +45 
TF Hip 552 +45 
TFMI 528 + 46 
TFWAp 533 -45 
VriuApppU.93 +.141 
US Govt 5JC4 +41 


r624 +.T4 
1357 +.10 
1612 +45 
10.93 

1162 +49 
1173 +28 
1859 +21 
613 +46 
1027 +42 
1)58 +41 
1665 +.10 
MNMuA 1143 +47 
U*AmArl7M7 
MnJrtsA 857 +46 
MunLMA 1042 + 41 
AAutrTTA 1051 +46 
MNattA 1141 +47 
15J4 

1130 +48 
1121 +.10 
2155 

7177 +.10 
13.93-43 
1646 +44 
OOP +.10 
856 
691 

1126 +48 
950 + 44 
975 +41 


NtResA 

NJMA 

NYMnA 

PacA 

PA AAA 

PhnxA 

SpVlA 

StrDvA 

STGiAo 

TechA 

TXMA 

WtdtncA 

AdjRB 


AmertaBtiaiQ +46 
AZMBt II. 18 +48 
Bafit 1257 +43 
BasVtBt 2389 +21 
CriMnBt 1223 + 49 
CAMB 1052 +49 
CaofifS r ts.48 -54 
Cn+flBt 85S +43 
InvGdSt 1112 +45 
CofTBf 7145 +45 
DrcsBp 1751 +.19 
EuroB t 1695 +51 
FedSecB T1047 +43 
FLAABt 1678 +.10 
FdFTBt 1615 +.16 
FdGrBt 1056— (K 
GlABt 1354 +49 
1613 +46 
1098 - 

1358 +27 
1759 +20 
X79 +45 


GffldBt 

GJOvBf 

GtUIBt 

GrlRBt 

HdaOhat 


tnUBoBt 1154 +41 
GtHdB 1350 +49 
LatAniB 1 1755 —20 
AAAMBt 1155 +40 
MIMuBf 1055 +.10 
AANSABt 1143 +47 
AAnlnsBt 857 +46 
MnLWBt 1042 +41 
AArirdS 1041 +47 
AANaHBt 1141 +48 
NtResflt 1690 —07 
NJMB! 1150 +48 
NYMnBt 1221 +.10 
NCMBI 1143 +.10 
OHMBt 1154 +49 
PocBt 2042—42 
PAAABt 1177 +.10 
PhnxBt 1370 —04 
STGIBt 854 - 

SoVIBt 1670 +44 
StrDvB I 1348 +.10 
TechBt 684—44 
TXAABt 1126 +48 
unmet 95 $ +ju 
WtdtacBI 959 +43 
M antmr atFdK 

113 +45 
ii83S:Sl 


BICh 



GtpNuiM WMy 
Pd Nay* Last Oree 


SOTAn 1079 +46 
StFTAn 1631 +43 
YXITAn 1651 +45 
VriuelApl609 +.14 
VriueTA 1611 +.14 
VAlTAnll.il +45 
VA1IAD ll.tl +45 
W aB anw M fWc 
MBond 1042 +45 
HrinFd 1650 +05 
Nffiwfh IUI *M 
TxFrot 1688 +54 
LtSGvtnr 10.19 +43 


AMT Brin 1687 +.16 
Genesis 626—01 
GUORhin 19.10 +.16 
LMMotn 1051 +JB 
Atonhatn 11 J3 +.12 
MUST 1149 +45 
pcxtnrs n 214* +20 
SriSrietn 2340 +58 
LWraBdn 953 +41 
NawAlter 31.18 +54 
NewCrffto 1252 +46 
NewllSAP 1273—47 


metUn 5422 +54 
MOilIn 26*7 
Nfctdncn 357 +42 
NchLdn 1679 +43 
Hifcti ol ni Apnka rie i 
BaIGthB M25 +49 
CoreGrihA1641 +42 

CareGrdtB1634 +41 

CoroGrthOUTB +42 
EmoGrA 1618 +.15 
EmsGrB 1617 +.15 

EmgGrQuH139 +.1* 

IncGrA 1604 +.11 
incGre 1617 +.11 
WWGrB 1696 +22 
wwur 1541 +22 
Nomura rri 17 J4 +49 
North Am Funds 
AstAflp 1153 +42 
GCrp 1615 +.13 
Gwthp 1447 —02 
Grlncp 1255 +48 

USGvt p 10.11 +43 

NelnvGrn 2645 +.12 
NetavTrn 1050 +.10 


AdlUST iaio +41 
AOGovA 10.1 0 +41 
COTFA 1054 +47 
GtfUndTT 943 —01 
GvtlncA 943 —01 
IncnnwTrlOAO +43 
moomeA 1051 +43 
TFtacA 1023 +47 

TFtacT 1633 +47 

VriuGrA 1022 +.16 
VriuGrT 1628 +.16 


CAlns 
CAVri 
FLVri 
msMun 
MD Vet 
MAIDS 
AAA Vd 
MlVri 
Mur0d 
NJVri 
NYlns 
NYVOI 
OH Vat 
PA Vri 
VAVri 
ovBRmdk 
COPAPBA8057 +47 
EmGrttiA 1643 +.17 
GqvtSecAI047 +44 
OakHaRn 1619—83 
Oriaortc 2X47 +46 
Oakrmit 1654 +27 
Oberwek 2253-47 
OceonTE p ms? +4S 
OWM 1128 —12 
Otritomta 2822 +.15 
OtvEqlnc 1655 +45 
Otyeafln 1670 +.12 


1145 +48 
1147 +48 
1073 +4? 
11.19 +48 
1061 +47 
1078 +48 
1025 +46 
1045 +48 
955 +44 
1070 +49 
IBM +48 
1140 +46 
WL95 +47 
1051 +49 
1673 +47 


►47 


FdMaAP 1255 -41 iBtmchard Funds: 
FM3&P 1254 +.01 1 Amerf=qnl625 -.15 


GlEqAp 1148 -.091 
GlEoBon 1171 -481 
GIGvAp 9.14 -43 1 
GfGvBpn 9.17 -.07 1 
GvSCAn 1058 - 45 
GvScSo 1049 -45 


FtxTFBdn 322 -43 
Rexlncn 617 -41 
GIGrnp 1071 +43 
PrcM np 9 JO —.14 
ST Gin 155—01 
ST Bond n 341 


GvTIBp 
GVTICp 
G rlnc p 
H ortJAP 
HOTOBP 
HiYlrinvA D678 * 43 
HiYlOBP 679 -.03 
AAuBAp 1661 -45 
MunBBP 1641 
PaasAP 1100 -.12 
Poeeflp 11.96 -.13 


Oxxevn 3140 - 29 1 Eaton V Lid Mtys 


CUrsFunds 
Brian An 1052 -46 
Ealdx 2615 -23 
GfcBdt 1020 -41 
GrEqn 1053 -49 
IntBd n 1612 - 42 
inrtGrn 1356 -.14 
VriEqftpnl349 - 43 
CoweniGr 1150 -.13 
CowenOh 1270 - 43 
Crttobe Husore 
AsJAOo 1345 -49 
Eauitvp 1639 —21 
OR AAunN16V3 -49 
Soedrin 1327 *.lv 
CrusiFundS Trust: 
Bond n 1028 + 4* 


OHTxFt 1634 -46 USBIn 
CaTxFt 164* -46 uraincn 
FLTxFr 1670 -4S vetoen 
MATxFtlOJS +45 1 WMdw 
MrTxFf 1123 -46 iFidSTSl I sc tt: 
NarT»Frtl071 +45! A*r 17J8 
NJTxFt 1662 +45 
NYTxFt 1666 +46 
PATxFt 1072 -07 
Eaton VMaratfM: 

Chirtat 1359 +41 
ALTxFt 11.15 +48 


Fountain Square Fds: 
Srionced III* -4* 
StrOoFt 2143 -21! Gavtsecxi6ia — 41 
Trend n *1.10-411 MiJCop 1029 -.11 


11JJ9 -JJ4 
1656 -25 
4151 *21 
1371 +.14 I 


► 41 


1253 -46 
2921 -21 
2940 -23 
1631 -49 
1651 -4* 

B)<MOipns>445 * .10 ■ HTImSa P 1*31 -.11 USGvA p 10*4 
DiSCvp 2152 -.13 HT.WaFlp 1643 -43 USSvflt 1053 
Fmtrnp 2633 -27 HcritaCrio 9.13 . JtVBol 1127 

Gov Sec 1673 - 4S ; Htmuer Btv Fds: KSMun 12.93 *02 

Grwmno 1142 +.16- BIChGr 10J1 -44 ICS lAftunU 124V +42 
PaMertn 1074 - 47 STGv 9.91 -21 Kcufmcnnr 156 
SaMori 7.93— .02. SrrCpGr IL57 -49 Kemper Foods: 
WldwGrplWB -.09 USGcvr 1124 -S3 AiSGcv 658 +41 
Harbor Funds: 

Sere -:Sz -42 
CCPApp r.'JJi -.13 
Growth r 1356 - 4 : 

1-1T.+. ZS53 -53 
SMCurnx 922 -27 
vauer iis* -.13 


BroHiYd 9.95 +45 
Fund 1621 +47 
mesmex » 44 
Muni 692 -44 
OppGt inn -.19 


27 J MAS Funds: 


QuriBd* 1077 —41 
QocfGr 1043 -.03 
F reoU n Group: 


GvSCCP 1057 -45 [BdEndOw 1655 +.13 
GvTg97p 1344 - 43 /Boston Co tosh 
GvTuvo 9.03 -42' AslMorBnlllV +.12. 

9.0B -42 1 CoApBp 2856 -59 1 
948 - 42 IlgsBnp 1325 - 44. 
1136 -.17, Modia HP1146 -47 
1SJ0 +46 (Boston Co Rehrib 
1554 - 46 1 AlocAe 1SJ8 -.1* 


SiBdn 

SpEan 

Vduen 

VAMun 


1622 +42 
1115 +.18 
11-53 -41 
1657 -45 


C0PAA0 2686 -59 
ITBSAa 1625 -4* 
IntA 1372 -25 
MadlAp 1146 -47 
SdGrAp 1720 —2* 
TfBdA 1279 -47 


T&BYAPllJS +JD 1 Boulevard Funds: 
TEHiYBpllJS -.03 1 


TaxExlAPll J< 


.03 

►441 


BIChiO 956 +.02 
AAanairK x 9.77 -45 


CuFdAcSn 1602 
CuFdSTn 9.99 -41 
DGmvostor: 

Equity 1029 — JO* 1 
GovKnco ’.615 -44 ! 
LTGovt 9.98 -42 
fAunilnc 1092 +.09 
Dean Witter: 

Am vat 2152 -.10 
CriTuFrt 1350 + 48 
CapGTOl 1228 - 44 
Cenvtt 11.12 -43 
DvGiht 19.14 - 03 
OivGtht 31J2 +.17 
DMnhi 1074 —.02 
EaHncr 87* -J» 
Eurot 1601 +.12 


AmGridrZ328 -7* 

Autor 2528 —46 
Biotech r 2959 -24 
Bnscstr 2X16 -.(I 
Broker r 1751 +.10 

Chemr 3123 -76 

AZTFl 1154 -49 ( Campr 25-83 -JO ' CO TF 
ARTxFi 1140 - 49 I ConPrdr 1116—49 1 CTTF 
CstHour 20.17 —41 
DlAeror 19.10 -77 
DavCcm rl976 —57 1 
EleUlllr 1347 - 71] 

Elcarr 1675 +25 
Energy r 17.11 -JQ; 
EhoSvcr 11-52 —.16] 

Ertviror 1 129 -18 
FtaSvcr 5245-157 
FtXXj r 

Heatthr 6454 -72 
HcrneF 2577 -.15 
tadEqnr 1928 - 43 
I ntf Aar r 2157 - .19 
Insurr mug -27 
Letsrr 4150 -.IS . 
MeCDefr 3107 + .0(' 
NalGCSr 9.76 —01 > 

Paper r 1958 -41 1 
PreeMetr 17.15 — 59 ' 
ReoBnkr IB 32 -J1 i 
Retaar 398 +43! 

Soffwrr 2825 -48 j 
Teehr 4058 -2* 1 


ColMnt 1079 -4? 
COTxFt 1142 -49 
CTT»FI 1141 -48 
Ealnt 1170 -.11 
RoTxFt 1143 -.10 
GATxFt 1676 -49 
Hilnct 776 - 45 
KYTxFt 1080 -48 
MOTXF1 11.12 +J» 
AAATxFt 1121 -48 
M(T»Ft 11.16 -JW, 
MN TxFf 1693 +471 
MOTxFMU* -49 , 
NJTFt HJ6 +48 [ 
NYTuFt 1175 -49 I 
NtMunt 10X0 *48 
NCTjtFt 1056 *48 
OhTxFl 1129 - AS 
ORTxFt 11.11 +48 
PATF 1 1175 -48 
RlTxFt 1640 +.10 
SCTkFt 1693 -48 
TNTsFl 1698 -49 
VATxFt 11.17 -J« 


AGE Fund 2.95 - 42 . Hearttand Fds: 

AtftJS 953 -4* USGv+c 1663 -46 

AR5 10-00 -41 v=lu*p 4X62 -.51 

ALTF 1249 - 07 WTTxF 1C57 -47 

AZTF 1153 - ,C6 Herades Fuat 
BcOrrv 2273 LAmrvcl ;5J0 -.15 

COIIns 1174 -42 NAj— G rmTCXl -47 

CAlrterml690 -47 PeW/et 1579 -.10 
CotTFr ret -4* Hefflteue Fends: 

1275 -47- CcoApoc’527 -.19 

1142 -47 Crvlrcc 1165 -45 

OrtSK 1255 - 42 IdCGra 15.63 -44 

ONTC 972-43 LMGCVO 9.41 -42 

Eouiiy 697 -45- SmCcoSalftTC — .17 

Eauic 14J* -47 .teghMork Funds: 

FtST ARS 1041 -41 Btfcrcn n 1613 -.04 


BlueOtP 

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Sivlnor 

EnvSvc 

FLT* 

Gtotnc 

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WWeM 

income 


lntlEq n 155Q — 48 
LMDjrFI n WJ7 - .02 ' 
45 1 

AAunFxl 1170 +.10 
SelEqn IK2T +.IS 
SelFln 1074 +44 1 
SelVMn 1154 -.19' 
SmCOVlnUJ* -.13 
SpFin 
Value n 


1117 +.10 
774 +46/ 

662 +4* MtoBkFC 10-55 

1358 . j 

1076 -49 1 
978 +41 ! 

14.13 +47i 


1057 +45 
847 + 46 

inSPund 1046 -.10 
MuniBd 1071 +.IDi*APS! 

1156 -47 MITAp 
161* +49 MIGAp 

1157 +45 1 BondAO 1120 +.11 
1168 +481 EmCfAp 19.13 - .17 


3156 - J6 ’ GA TF 
- GIGvInc 
GfUtll 
Gold 
Growth 
HY TF 
MIMuBd 
incoSw 
IN TF 
Inst Adi 
InsTF 


FedimermiiJM +46, 
FedTx I2J7 -48| 
FLTFln 1C *9 -49 
FLTF I2JW -46 ' 
1271 ‘49 
954 -45 


NYTF 
3HTF 
Retire! 

ReSre: 

Rehrea 
Re&®4 
STGt* 

SmCpEq 
Teemoi 
TXTF ... 

Teftctm 1612 
USGvt 971 

13.92 -46 Kemper bend: 

' Divlnct 679 * 42 I 

Grit 753 + 42 1 

Gwthl 1870 -.15 

HiYat 65B +44 

STGlt 752 -41 

5WMt 853 -41 


1146 +.14 

J1 J7 -.11 j 

1 


AsetAflP 1054 +44 
BtuCEaA 1355— 41 
OscVaM UTS +.12 
EatadxA 1350 +.11 
GvArmA n 9.97 —01 
GVSdAp 1047 +43 
IncEqA 1320 +47 
bncriTNBdl045 +45 
fntFxI 1044 +44 
InTTF A 1170 +48 
intEaAn 1X74 +.17 
LsCbGr 1(57 +41 
LBCOVri 1152 — 44 
LIVoiA 1043 +42 
OHMuA H50 +47 
SmCoGr 1721 +41 
TFBdA 1612 +44 
lllCOroo 1053 +43 
lllQorNC 1687 +47 
OppeabebnerFdi 
AssetAp T350 +.14 
CATE Apt 1/C' +46 
ChpHYP 73J9 +48 
OrscfdP 3971 +.19 
EqlncAp 1629 +.12 
EqlncB UTS +.11 
GBtoP 2451 +51 
GlGrP 1520 +74 
GiobEnvpT155 +47 
G(obriAp3B77 +1 20 
Globffl 3617 +59 
Gokfp 1476—73 
GvBecApiaVf 
HYMB 1X58 +48 
FSYMA 1X73 +M 
InsTEAp 1347 +.10 
imrTEo IS7X +46 
InvGrAp 1172 +44 
MStncGrA22-H +76 
MtgtacA 1412 +M 
NYTaxApllXl +47 
NYTxBn 1352 +47 
Oauen 1170 +.1S 
PA TEA pi 225 +45 
SpedAp 2854 +J5 
StrtncAp 578 +42 
SbihcBt 579 +42 
StsSTlAp 485 . 

SttnGrAp 575 +45 
SMnvAp 5.15 +42 
Tcnetp 2641 +56 
TxFrB 10J0 +45 
TxFrAp ID JO +44 
Tlmep 1646 +48 
TaiRtAp 842 *M 
ToJRJBn B47 +45 
USGvt D 948 +42 
VodAp KU6 +48 
OverfoBd Express: 
AstAIA 1241 +.11 
CATE A 1146 +46 
MuincA JJ77 +46 
SratGrA 1374 +42 
ST Govt 5142 +42 
USGvIA 16» +43 
VRGA 1601 +41 
PBHGGrn Ti6* +74 
PPAMCUFdB 
Brian 1075 +46 
CopApn 1322 +.16 
OfvLawnlZW +.17 
EnhEan 12.15 +48 
Ealncn 1127 +.16 
Inffn 1109 *01 
MedB<gnl626 +43 
MidCop 1475 +.15 
SmCaG (8.97 +.(6 
SmCpV 1X15 +44 
2677 +.12 UttStkn 946 
2116 *47 iPlMCOFDKtR 
2125 +.11 I TriRstn 1074 +45 

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ESCORTS & GUIDES 

I INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 1 


(Continued From Page 4) 

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. _l 17JQ +74 
SmCorBtKIJi — JJ6 
U»8p *72 +.15 
CofTDP 1173 +44 
USGvBt 1013 -44 
AKJO 1736—27 
1346 *SB ' CCSAD 1241 +.13 
1004 +JS2! ComTecp 974 


NtahB 

Adi At 

BMKkGv 

CAJrtAp 

EtHtAp 

EntncA 

FfOiAf 

GhbAP 

GtAstA 

GRJlAf 

GvFlAto 


1358 +.10 
956 - 

975 +41 
>076 +07 
U.17 +.15 
Ull +49 
Tij7 +a 
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141 . 

um +76 
. --- 977 +44 
GtOaAp 1270 +45 
HYWAfp 840 * 42 
InVOrAfP 1X57 +46 
MritlAp 13J8 
MuHA 1155 +45 
PoCQrA 16X0— S3 
STGWP 973—02 
UtnAtP 9.98 *,lfl 
OOMui 1271 +71 
AdBBf 9JS - 
EqutBnt 1*16 +.15 
Brine nl 1448 +49 
RSrfiff 12 26 *M 
FISfrAt 1272 +45 
FbOilHi UXJ +.07 
GNMA0R14JY *44 
GMS03 1.93 . 

GW4B1 1326 +48 


RBBGvtpKltLM— 02 
RCMFund 2158 +45 
RSI Treat 
AOfid 2773 +.16 
Gore 3676 +79 

£»'■-» if 

stif . 1728 
Vriue 2747 +52 
Rrinbown 57» +44 
ReaGrap 1376 +48 
RMdsPUMd: 

CXBBat 1254 +44 
CXBEq 1347 +45 
DSDv 1)70 +48 
DSILM 926 +44 
FMASPC 1058 +44 
KMX 1620 +45 
SAMlPMn945 
SB-SdEq n 1773 +.16 
5bGwtttnl076 +49 
SWTRn 1002 . 

SrBrin 1024 +47 
SterBln 1140 +48 
TSWEq 11.17 
TSWFlx 10X3 +45 
TSWIntl lift +.14 
RdlTcnon 17.95 +49 


BriTrir 1018 +41 
GtAcMTT nWJ7 +45 
GwtrvTrn 10X1 +47 
IntlEpTrnlZfO +.1S 
SiGvMT 1016 +42 
SmCaaT 1020 +47 
TERTTnWTJ +48 

TaxRTrnlOTS +44 

VMwTrnlQ54 +47 
RadnilmrTTsf: 
Brianasd 1747 +.12 
EnGra. 1X97 +.1S 
Bqtacom W4T +M 
income 1671 +47 
1112 +49 


H2£2l 

wOTwnts 


Bkiedip 3X59 —S3 
RTFdnfp3571 — JB 
GavSecp 1346 +.13 
Growth p 2612 +48 
MidCoOP 2849 —41 

SacAwp 2656 +41 

RhncaBd 1009 +43 
(Gmcasac 1272 +.17 
RNer« 1079 +45 
RhrerflGVt 1003 +43 




, ES5S S3 :S 


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Schrader 678 

+m 

CATFn 1170 +78 Srtewem 
GovSI 10*3 +-® SSLSm IS +46 
IrSndk. 1077 *43 wS +S? 

MrrFBoiax? +-W £?£*” {n? *03 
1000 r liu +.13 TSSb 576 +J» 

STFBUP1077 +45 IgWjP 

SmOMr 1*5 +■% *££2^3174 +71 

SooNAdl 1*40 +7t Baton" arm 

ScudderFUhdK wS 

B0tonc8dniZJ8+4B werim i**> M 

CriTxn 1025 +48 Muron^ 72 
CcpGtn 2147 -44 aareri +M 

Dawriopn334l +7D tow +S 

GNMAA 1570 +45 CwgpUL 1013 
GtaWn . 2040 +75 CapflD 


GBmOo 1670 +44 
Gown 1173 -.W 
Grwlnca (778 +-H 
Income n U.W +48 
internal! 0*542 +os 
fnHBdn 1X60 +45 
LriAmrrZUT +-M 
MATxn 1476 +-’0 
MedTFn 1153 +M 
MMB 9.14 *M 
NYTxn 1170 +49 
QHTXh 1372 +.10 
PA Tax n 1611 +.10 
PmOppsn1858 +78 
QuriGrn 1676 +.10 
ST Bond n 1243 
STGSJfn 1157 
TxFHYn 13X7 +48 
Vriuen 13J17 +43 

zeroooon 1x13 +49 


1048 +« 
cShTOB 1047 +4» 
EJanW 1*1176 +(41 

EnerOYA 1159 +41 

OuTOtriL 1243 +43 
GvdnB 1241 +-« 
GlftCn *40 +■» 

invlYfi U9 

Kp BM +^ 

tavTrC 1W +^ 
NYTFAP 6« +46 
NYTFC BJO +44 


AMtodn 1X4 +42 
As»cn M +41 
Invest n 158 - 

Oceana n _X59 —42 


AssetA 1626 +.11 
BIO) 1848 +-17 
Bond 076 +43 
Sfafltty Foods: 
BondP 72) +42 
BaOtY 573 +45 
EqGlA 1062 +42 
Grlnc 
TxEx 


Ultra 


CapOppnSXSa +49 
Gvttncn 1077 + 46 
HyMunn 1142 +^ 

taeonwi >£26 +4S 
tarnifidn 949 + 45 
•ntMunn 1170 *07 

MfidMun 9M +46 

Ptt meCq nl*B0 +48 
Sped n 2*43 +.U 
S^Sn 2*27 +74 

TriIRrin 2757 +.10 

777 +48 SUrikwFwro: 

1045 +46 [ OMdrodnUro +76 


757 + 47 


Growth n 2059 +73 

, SmConn 2649 +42 

AmSh*npi54B +40 ptoeneFWifc 
Ss4Shsnp 1029 +.11 1 ArNtg n 1020 


USGov pn 9-23 +43 I 


FrondecAllTB +.13 
CapFdA 1474 +70 
COTxA 773 +44 
CrnStkA 1175 +.12 
GomuiA M52 +78 
OxnmunDWT? 
FLTXA X12 +45 
GA1XA 874 +49 
GtolBreaAUt +.16 

G&rttO 11.11 +.16 

GrowthA- 639 +03 
IncameA 1678 +48 


AmUton 1077 +.19 
CmSTOn 1M8 +42 
Oiscovn 1855 +.10 
GovScn 1072 +43 
10.19 +44 
1052 +48 
1141 +46 
1470 +.16 

1977 +47 

MunAdnlOJD +45 
OrwMyn36B7 +37 

STBond n - tlfl +43 
STttomn 1640 +43 
Total n 25.13 +J7 


KYlMu 

tnaon 

InsMun 

Min 

tantn 


tnarrwO 1*74 +48 SunEogGut 5045 -43 
taflA 1672 +.13 SuoAtnerlcoPro: 
LATxA 675 +45 BaiAsetA P1578 +.10 


McnaTxA 875 +45 
MDTXA 859 +44 1 
MTTXA 943 +45 
MtanTXA 624 +44 
MOTkA 621 +46 


NCflTXA 

NJTXA 

NYTXA 

NCRXA 

OWoTXA 

ORTlcA 

PATXA 


822 +46, 
616 +45 
BS7 *07 
819 +46 
8X3+46 
8JH +44, 
879 +06 


BriAMBp!575 + .10 

DrvtncBP 112 +42 

EmGr A p 17X5 +44 
EmGrB 17X0 +43 
fisdScBplOJO +43 
GrowthA P1489 _ 

HBncSp 850 +44 
WnCAp 640 +44 
TEInsAplXaa +46 
USGvA 8X2 +42 
VSGvBP SM +4) 
Vriuee 1525 + 42 


CAHyTxA 6X8 +43 TARGET: 

CAODcA 7.15 +46 1 tabvSdtaMTI +41 


7.15 +06 
SCTKA 644 +4S 
USGvtAp 773 +42 
HJYBdAp 705 +43 
SenOMI Group: 
AsoGrlho 572 +41 
BatanooctRUXV +.10 
Bortdpx 6X6 +42 
ComSIKP 3D7D +74 

GvSecs pxl055 
Growth P 17X9 —42 
PA TFW 1377 +43 

TFtncm UM +06 

World p 1344 +70 
Serorm 01*75 +.14 

SeauBtan SSJi +JO 


Matrix n 1X15 +49 
SAP AIM ail II +.15 
SPSOOn 1073 +49 
STGvtn *72 
YMPIn 1040 
1784 Foods: 

GavMed 1047 +42 

GriMncn 1144 +.16 

MATEbinl056 +48 


taHEqn 1610 +77 

LpCapGrnlDOS + .13 

LgCopV 1071 +43 

MNBkdfnl076 +42 
SmCcsC .1270 +.16 
SmCapV 127D-48 

TriRiBd HUB +43 

TNEFuroit: 

/rrt&jfl pr!5A7 +.12 
AdUSAP 7X6 - 

BrianAp 12-53 +48 

BdlncAp 1X32 +06 

CA TF A P 749 +46 

C<vG(flnl5X6 +.18 

OtoGrAp 15.70 +.18 

GtobGAPU75—01 

GrOpAP 1344 +.12 

GvScAp 1142 +06 
GwthA p 1049 +47 

HDncAP 1620 +44 

InteaAp 1652 +72 
LhfUSA 1X55 +42 

MaSST APT7X0 +.13 

TtfxAp., 732 406 

VriueAo 870 +47 


TEkMednl052 +44 TSAK FOoriri 


Shawtndl FbpdK 
FxdincTrnlQXJ +45 
GrEqTTT ' HUB +.12 
GrtncBTT p!076 +43 
kuKhrCTTnlOTS +43 
LTlncTrri 9.98 +42 
SmCoET 11.16 —41 
Storm Trust: 

CalMup 1159 +48 
Cplncp ILSf + 47 
EnvGrp 1645 +.16 
FUroo 1020 +.10 
GrtoCP 1175 +-E 
Growth P 1246 +45 
HiltGrp 1146 —06 
NatMup 1175 +49 
STOP 25* 
USGWP 1021+4* 

^SmSmITO +47 
USndtn 10166 +42 
‘ n 1&«6 +42 
hi 1X66 +.13 
n 12X6 +.13 

mur +45 

VDMunlt 1172 +45 


tatrFxnx 856 
lntlEq n 943 +47 
InilFXnx 857 
LsGrwn KUO +.11 
U/Vrin . 95a +45 
MtgBHdm(615 —03 
Mum'n 822 +48 
SmGrwn 1X78 +73 
anvaln 979 *45 
TWannx- 848 


AmerTrrl3J4+.18 
CaPAcc 1641 +77 
D0VMktp1554 — 50 
Forgo P 2975 *76 
GtabOpp 1546 +71 
Growth p 1872 +72 
Incomw 1007 +41 
REsSp 1618 +46 
SmriCbP 636 +.10 
WritoP 1479 +72 
TsmetolanlMttt: 
EmMSp 1330 —54 
FriEDS .1*07 +. 19 
mafi 1108 +.13 
GrwthS 1277 +.18 
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UlflBt 1654 +.19 • 
Voice Eweftonwer 
CtpE 17045 +X*.. 
DepBrin 8610 +43 . 
Grain 17613 +JXJ. 
Bxs 21157+1X3 
BcFd 75243 + 153 
FdEx 151 73 +3* 
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AdmLTn 10-W +.10 . 
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AssefAn 16W +.J3 
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Ealncn 1349 + 70 
Explorer n*579 *36 ■ 
Morgan n 15.23 +4B 

Pimcpn 1970 +07 
Quarin 1479 +.17 
STARn 13X9 +.12 
Trinttn 3257 +39 
TYUS 3123 +^ * 
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STFetin 1639 +42 • 
STCOrjMI 1074 +41 - 
ITTsryn 1074 + 45 
GNMAn 1050 +41 , 
ITCorpn 1045 +4* 
LTTsryn 1677 +49 
LTCripn 936 +44 
HYCoron 614 +45- 
Prcfdn 9X6 +44 
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1171 +07 
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SPTechr W5T +36 \ 
SPUHI 11X3 +.19 
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InHGr 1348 +7* 
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NYVen 1X58 +73 
RPPBl 672 +41 
RPFGRt 1573 +.12 

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IncomeB t 856 +44 
taflSt 1X79 +.16 
OpqrBt -SUM +79 
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TaraetB 12X3 +41 
, USGawSr 937 +42 
618 +41 TharabDniFdK 
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CapApB 1684 +75 
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MIA . 1692 +73 

MB 1877 +72 
MOGOVM 1X92 +45 
MuCriA 1X18 +.10 
MuFLA 1370 +.12 
MULtltA 648 +M 
MunNtA 1636 +.12 
MUNJA 1474 +.11 
MuNYA ISO 1 +.11 
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blW-13 +JM LWCM 1344 +44 
^ ^ » 1605 +43 LtdGvtp 1272 +J02 

SWI M W H htoA LMMunp!341 +44 
AOGuAp 972 . NMM 13X4 +45 

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TWGAp 1X74—43 LAMun*UJ7 +43 
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CoVWAp 1640 +45 TTademaik FuDdR 
KvsSttrcpXSI +43 Ewttyn 1071 +76 
FOVriAp 845 —41 Govtlnai nl614 +45 
SOME 30-TJ +75 KYMunnlOXS +SO 
WhKAtx 1278 — 41 SI Govt it ■ 971 +43 
WCAA 8X8 +45 TW Pto fcto 
MNYA 871 +45 AriGyA .1040 +41 


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CAM 1076 +47 - 
OtoGT 3278 +72.* 
EquByphl353 +.14 » 
Bovine. 1178 +76 
Grlnc 3178 +79 
GWMMIPIXB +32 
GrtnBr 3172+78 
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TFtncm 1272 +.12. 
Vriumet 1550 +.16 w 
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Contra n 11X3 +73 

EmGrp 1878 + 73 

VriPtus 1X51 +79 


BdGrowplX62 +.14 
RoMup 19.12 +.1* 
UdNYp SOS +41 
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DMnp 1X38 +42 
Growth p Ul*s +78 
MEqo 1279 +74 
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FennMu 630 » 

EqtaC 5X3—41 
Premier n 6X7 +73 
Value In 943 +71 


AmGasn 1X17 +.14 
SMPtaxnlXBf *70 
OTC btefl 1778 +49 
USGLan 1X52 +.10 
US tatn 977 +45 
MOTFn TITS +76 
VATFn 11X2 +77 
tydritava 1178 +.17 
BCWtoln 1042 —41 
sssFcvn an +48 
SBSFFdn 1577 +42 
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BabtaCP 1X52 +.12 
Bwdnp 1157 +.10 
Brindxp 10X2 +44 
GaJGrn 1177 +.16 
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SWGVOP 1047 +41 
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MdC&p OJH +.V4 
PAMunnplITS +76 
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Vatoenp 11.73 
GOPAnn 1647 +.15 
SIFE Trust XJS +46 
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Orth Inc 2527 +79 
Grwthn n.12 +.13 
Ml 160* +50 
TriAWDlXM +43 
USGov WA5 +71 
571 Ossric 
BoTTTn HUS +79 
QtoGriP 076 +.13 
QriGlT . 7271 +.13 
taGBT 10J9 +4* 
taGdUnplOXO +4B 
taGBfyd 1149 +46 
STB0TTnlM2 +41 
ShTTrTmlOTl 
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LtdMuP 63* +42 
LWTTP 779 +43 
MpGvAp 1X17 +45 
MgMuApMXl +43 
MaMuAplTJS +.11 
MNWAp 1347 +.10 
NyMuAp I7J7 +.12 
PTMIAD 21X7 —sr 
SnEqAp 2638 +43 
PrTRA 
lABAp 

WtacAp 6X1 —O) 

WWPAp 174 

5*n BMm ygn in Bi 
ApGrer 3737 +51 

AporSI 11J5 +47 

CaMuBt 1640 +45 

CrimSte 1554 +43 

CSrVBl 1356 +42 

DvsinB.t 60 +4D Trust Far Cred Uk 
EwpB) 1673 +33 G5P 932 

FUWwat 1X58 +46 MSP 929 +41 

F^at 845 —41 TMP1996 947 +41 

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Gv5«t 1046 +M aMtOtoPwr. 

CrtaBt lOO *JJ Britavn 1657 +06 


CATFApTOJIJ +77 

CapApp 1X31 +78 

BnGAP 2611 +3t 
Gvfincp 651 +74 
GrtnAp 1278 +.10 
GUStcp 151 +74 
InflGv 2549 
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- . TFBdA UTS +78 
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Gvtnct 926 +44 
GrtnBJ IXJJ +.1® 
HYTFt 921 +75 
WYMt 634 +73 
NrifiJt 1649 - 

TFBdSt 1145 +JB 


HBixSTx 1238 —01 
tavGdBt 1X38 +.17 


CriTPra 1X56 +.18 
Eouttyn 1341 +35 
Growthn 2024 +39 
HiYWlt 949 +43 
taeamn 1623 +4* 
Manic n MJS +J1 
NWn 1X29 —74 
USGov n 92S+43 
$eaon«Grpl(Jl +.10 
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(nvusne 1674—28 
Onporl 31.15 *3S 
ScnrtarV 37X8 +J8 


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DvrsMW 12X* .. 

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OH TP 1153 +79, 

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HerMrn 103S +.15 
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LTBepan 978 +J)4 
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TkESTn 1048 +71 
TkElrin 1672 +76 
TkB-Tn jojx +48 

unran 2x45 +.12 
USGvn 9X9 +71 
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1574 +J2 USLccBssncnSjB +jm 
661 — 01 USAAfiroopr 


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MaMuB t 1631 +JQ 
NJMuBl 13X7 +.1Q 
NvMuBt 1727 +J3 
PrMIflr 2157 — SJ 
Prmrmmm +36 
SectrBt 15L86 +77 
SpEqBt a 132 +22 
SlrtnBt 17X7 
TeWBt 1274 _ 

1656 +.11 

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WtacBt 


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Brigneedflixn +75 

CABdn 1175 +30 
COrnstn 2346 +.11 
GW6A 1027 +71 
£««" 976 —29 

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Grwtti n 7749 +.14 
tacSWn 16<2 +.11 

tacoenen 1272 +.10 

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bWEqn 1578 +75 ■- 
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NYMiMniaxj +JM- _ 
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S&PSOOn 1X72 +49 - 
USTAHn 1015 +.10 ^ 


A2TF ITJJJ +7s V 
WBPt 1579 +JW- 
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ORTE 1754 +.11 _ 
BOBnvIn 1876 +.10- : 
BasVHn 21X9 +.16 ' 
frinln 11.16 +.10 " 
GNMA (n 1673 +76 
taffldn 1070 +74 - 
WUDCOInl779 +.17 - 
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BadnvR 1686 +.17 

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Page 17 


,^1 HERALD TRIBUTE, MONDAY, JANUARY 31. 1994 




'The AssocuttcdPras 
MELBOURNE — Steffi Graf 
tamed iii b neariy flawless 
Cjrmancc to win her fourth 
it Grand Slam title when the 
! of her only real rival ap- 



* « 


“Are you looking forward to 
Monica’s return?" she was asked 
after her £0, 6-2 defeat Saturday of 
■! Arantxa S&nchcz Vicario in the 
'Vj^KsraBan Open final. - - - 

•TfesT she said with a bewfl- 
•dered teolt <m her face, then paused 
- qmi -took a deep breath. - 
. With Monica Seles sidelined . 
smceshewas stabbed in the back 
,by .-it ' spectator during a German . 
tournament in April, Graf has tak- 
ei, women’s tennis bade: to the late 
^9gQ 5 _ r 'when she ruled the sport 
; Saturday’s victory made it 13 
st ry^hi' Grand Siam titles that 
havehera won by either Graf or 
Seles, a streak stretching bade to 
the 1990 UB. Open. 

^deshad won the previous three 
Australian Opens; since she was 
ntt yfoifli Graf has won all four of 
: the Giand Slam tournaments. 

Graf, who won her 15th Grand 
Sam title, blasted 14 forehand win- 
.00$ past SAncfcez Vic ario - w hile 
potting on her most d ominatin g 
pe rformance in a Grand Sl am final 
gather 6-0, 6-0 defeat of Natalia 
Zvereva in. the J98S French Open. 

"Especially in tte first set, I 
cfidnYseem to make any mistakes 
md whatever 1 did was dose to the 

thibk there havc beqa many mo- 



S amp ras Routs Martin 

In Australian Open Final 


Corrpilcd by Our Staff From Dapatdia 

MELBOURNE — Pete Sam- 
pras, serving aces as fast as 126 
miles per hour, won his third 
straightGrand Slam utle by over- 
powering Todd Martin m stnughi 
sets Sunday in the final of the Aus- 
tralian Open. 

Sampras, who had 13 ac*. over- 
came an early threat from Martin 
by winning a first-sei t. Ar=to, 
and then rolled to a 7-6 (74), 64, 
64 victory. 

He became the first man in near- 
ly three decades to win Wimble- 
don, the U.S. Open and iheAusira- 


left 


rested his head on Martin’s 

^ While congratulating other, 
Martin needled Sampras about 
leading 5-1 in the third seL and 
dropping three stnugM &am^ 
including a service game — betore 
finally ending the match. 

“He said, ‘Way to serve it oul 
H e was giving me a hard time. 

Sa fS S first all-American final 
in the Australian Open since 1982, 


and Martin show little personality 
on the court, and Sampras was 
firmly in control after the first ml 
S ampras was so consistent that 

be had two aces in a 
span in the final set - and each of 
the serves went past ex- 

actly 119 miles per hour tl90 kilo- 
meters per hour). , _ 

The St set took 63 minims, 
longer than the entire women si j- 
nal on Sauirday. Marlin had his 
best chance at 3-3 in the fr 51 
when he had four break points, but 


when Johan Kri<* defeated Steve “ even- 


Demon. 


Sampras’ powerful serves and 
oundstrokes often left the rnnlh- 


reaching in vain as the ball niiea 

pa ^He’sjust too good and he really 
deserves what he’s succeedm" ” 


other times it was done was by Roy 
Emerson in 1964-65 and Don 
Budge in 1937-38. 

Sampras, who was the top seed, 
raised his anus in triumph and 
screamed “Yeah!” after endmg the 
match with a forehand winner. The 
two men, who are golfing buddies, 
then put their arms around each 
other and Sampras momentarily 


because he’s really working his butt 
off,” Martin said. 

There were plenty of excellent 
shots in the 2-hour, 33-mmute 
match, but little drama. Sampras 


Dallas 
In 


’Dorsett, White Duke Reins in Maryland, Its Fresh 


lanStar 


tually forced the tiebreaker- 
-W he" I did lose the breaker, 1 
think it motivated Pete, it kwsened 
him up." Martin said. Like®®* 

of the top players, he plays a lot 
better when he’s ahead. 

Sampras said that he would now 
aim ai his biggest remammgcM- 
lenge, winning the French Open- 
Hesaid he would take a month o.f 
before the Paris tournament, which 

is held in May. . 

“The French Open is definitely a 
opal that is going to be very tough 
to achieve," he said, ’^o win on 
dav is the biggest challenge m my 
career, but Vm getting belter. 

He also was pleased to be travel- 



With 


hdp horn his teammates, 

center as Duke (15-1, 6-1) went on an 8-0 run. 

ThcAxvdaudfrB! same thunder from hto.3Kansas87,Cotorado53: Sieve 

Fame on the eve of Sundays Soper Begs** m waHai m jja^arnTNorth Carolina. semng 
the Cowboys were playing SS^JSSLoia Vikings; 24 points and grabbing ll rdjounds to 

B-w* sSfiSSAVSSJS 

reams had been tied for the ACC lead 


18 


West Virginia (13-3, 6-^) got 
points from Ricky Robinson. 
^Florida State 74. No. 21 Georgia 
Tech 73: Charlie Ward, the Herman 


ina in more ebte company 
“It's nice to get the respect from 
the older players, like (Rod) Laver 

and (Xen) Rosewall," he said. 

“1 feel like those guys were really 


Kansas (19-2, 4-1 Big Eight) used a 

COLLEGE BASKETBALL 


at 5-1. 

. Smith, averaging 21.5 points and 
108 rebounds, was held to mne re- 
bounds and 11 points on 3-for-ll 


ramts Vatican say I have played asco iT^id^derted Sattuday. 

fifcrthat. a senior nommee, were ford ajj-time 

■* ®reoeeded only 6 hours, 23uun- .- Doraett, the moWc^oftSc ' yft ar . ™de it in 

jitca, to complete all seven of her leading nisher ^ ii«l977roofae^ 1988with 12,739 

StasSg the twb-wericAns- tes first year of A 

trafian Open. Hiat was 

from Antonio Lang ind 

the 1982 Da»is Cup qnannfiMl.® 1 *&*?£££&& A* * Lod. 

■ ^ ^tocceer^ttt helping i ool.- 


smoinenng man-to-man defense that 
forced Colorado (9-8. 14) mio 23 


fntiB ran out. The Gophers got 
points from Voshon Lenard. 

wSSSTaC.'S Tech 73: Charlie Wart me nasn™ ‘ ^ I’ve always 

Jones scored 21 pmnte for the Owls Trophy-winning football 

(13-2. 6-1 AtlandclO), who extended made the winning layup with wo sec .«P 

to warning streak to seven games. onds left in the game m Altana 
The Colomais (8-8, 2-^), who have 

Forrest with 22 points The Snunote 
(9-7, 2-6) got 22 points from Bob Sura. 

■ Coaches Back Mediation 

The Black Coaches Association like- 


35 3S&rsissssasa asteSSta 


St. Louis. . .» 

Sincbez Vkano vwm only U 
points in the first .jbl When -she 
finally won a game, eariy mjbf 
sgcond set, she Cammed a ban m&i 
in ihe'air in odebratioo.' 


1963 - 77,1 
He was < 


lost four in a row. got 16 points from 
Nimbo Hammonds. 

No. 12 LouisriBe 94, Va. Common- 
wealth 74: Greg Minor scored 24 

points as the Cardinals quieted the 

crowd in Richmond. Virginia. w wiU follow the National Collegiale 

ncremt shoo tinfc. Louisville (16-2, 6-1 Metro Confer- Association in acc«>ting a 

“i^ ggSSa In ewe) gol 19 poin U _.Jiece_from gownuneel offer to m^eie fcrto- 
rr^ii T^twc Scottv Thur- Dwayne Morton and Clifford Robo'. The Assoaated Press reported, 

Knoxvffle Tennessee bcotty jniu Ke J y Ha^ scored 21 points for the am& 

Rams (11-6, 3-3). 

smtigM ” S e J?i5pSs JaimRo«s2^23 points and 

Arkansas (14-2, 5-2) got Juwan Howard had 22 and eight re- 

bounds as the Wolverines (134, 5-^ 


Rudv 


Smith said he wasn’t the only one 
with Duke’s defense. 


from Con# Beck Tennessee (3-13, I- 
7) was led by Cortez Barnes with 15 


^Ncl 7 Pnntae W, Na 17 Mtonewta 


Big Ten) won at home in Ann Arbor. 


for iii v wl nw* Ww*"«8» 

Reod THE MONEY REPORT 

ev«ySc4unkiyin6iB WT _. 


“’jSm spoit 1“ S'" 5 ”* 47 a^liogwtthM®* mre d 27 points. 

Sop" victoria pl«« »egot tho robouoOti. tDoy Ute Bnal W rmnmes m the game hi 

1 9^73. after replac- Mto ^nScDonaid n^ed a 3-p^ta 

- MWuiMAta (13-6. 4-3 Big Ten) as 


Suomsb 113-3. 4-3 Big Ten) made 13 
of 28 3-point attempts. 

St Bonaventure 72, No. 19 West 
VhsMae&loOta.NowYortttar 


pule, , 

quoting the group s director, 

Washington. , , ^ . 

While noting that his group had not 
made a final decision, Washington 
said: “We expect to go along. It’s just a 
matter of setting up a meeting and 

jusdcoDoparaonof^to^ 


r to, but Tm getting bope- 

fuily doer to their level. 

“If 1 can this form for 

the next five or six years, hopefully 
1 can be considered one or the 
greatest of all time and that s im- 
portant to me." 

“I basically set my goal this year 
to win a Grand Slam tide and 1 ve 
done that. These last coup e oi 
matches were pretty sweet. I played 
pretty well. It’s a major tide and 
this trophy is going to sureally nice 
in mv cabinet.” (AP , AFP. Reuters) 


Other Australian Results 


uPhrS DOUBLES PINAL 

Paul Haorhuteand-Jocra Emnrt }« . 

„i_vh_. mi Byron Blocfc. Zimbotiwe. and 
S£n“ark M Ui- 6-7 13-71.6-1 6^ 

J< “ «ME« DOUBLES FIKAL 


ry Moore scOTed 22. points mid the 




I Y mwifc ■* VWiV “ — _ I — . IA . j J 

Bonnies (8-8. 24 Atlantic Upended 
an ei^ii^atne losing streak against the 
Mountain eers- 


the dispute 

^^SedqStment’s offer headed off a 
threatened BCA-led boycott of coBeg^ 
basketball games. 


?BOU«LES final 
A ndnri OIW>v»klv. Rusaln. ond LarkM nw 
vnwi (6) Latvia, def- Todd woodnrtds®. Aus- 
svkovo 111. e*m 


lie, 7-5. 6-7 IB-VI. 6-Z 


nSdethe JroBovri six arajgfatyeara. 



OTC Consofttatad tradtaB to? 
onded Friday. Jan. 2a^.. 

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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 1994 



O N D A 


SPORTS 



SCOREBOARD 


SIDELINES 


!nB«d;V<- '.TV.:*:' 


NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 


Ti 


Atlantic dp, moit 

W L 

Pet 

GB 

bly 

poli' 

Min 

New York 

29 11 

.725 

— 

Ortondo 

26 17 

-605 

JVi 

Miami 

20 21 

-488 

Wi 

Now Jersey 

19 22 

543 

10Vj 

to t 

Boston 

19 33 

AS2 

11 

sure 

PhUadelPiita 

18 74 

j*S9 

12 

waste ngfan 

74 77 

547 

ISHr 

re$4 
ler 1 

Atlanta 

Central DIvMtan 

29 n 

.725 

— 

his i 

OUcopo 

29 12 

707 

Vi 

Choriotte 

22 20 

J24 

e 

the 

OevaMnd 

30 21 

-48B 

9to 

SS 1 

Indiana 

17 23 

-425 

12 

Milwaukee 

12 30 

-286 

18 

ner 

Detroit 

9 33 

220 

20VJ 

Eco 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


Si 


Midwest OfefstoP 
W L 

PO 

GB 

din i 

Houston 

31 10 

756 

— 

men 

Sen Anion Jo 

29 14 

474 

3 

Utah 

28 15 

451 

4 

reax 

Denver 

20 21 

.488 

11 

busi 

Minnesota 

14 27 

-341 

17 

cerb 

Rus. 

Dallas 

1 3« 

•371 

0Vi 

Seattle 

Pacific Division 
31 9 

.775 



“wo 

Phoenix 

23 12 

JOB 

3 


Portland 

25 16 

410 

tVi 

B’ 

Golden Stale 

22 18 

-HO 

9 

radi- 

LA. Clippers 

15 25 

-375 

16 

LA La kora 

14 26 

J5D 

17 

amo 

SacraniHiia 

12 29 

7*3 

1 **s 

last 

eleci 

FRIDAY'S RESULTS 


Piwenix 

14 31 

30 

23— IM 

PHiadotpbla 

29 0 

1* 

27—183 

govt 

P: CebOIIM 8-15 3-4 19. Malaria 12-21 5-4 33; 

P; Bradley 10-165-6 25. Wool rldof 10-194-424. 


Atlanta 2* 14 17 »- V 

San Antonie 17 33 17 23— WO 

A: Wlllli 9- 14 S-5 24, Wttatfev 4-7 3-3 11; 5; 
Ellis 11-30 3-3 28. PoOlnson 13-22 *-10 3S- Ra- 
bounds— Atlanta 41 ( Keefe lOl.San Antonio J7 
(Rodmon 131. Asslsts-Atlanta f I Ferrell 31. 
Son An Ionia 25 (Robinson. Anderson 01. 
Deiron W » 33 1*— 110 

Denver » * » 

Ot : JUU1I* *-142-220. Dumars 10-18 *-11 31 ; O: 
ft. William* 7-13 M 23. Slllti HI 7-7 21 Re- 
bounds— Detroit 40 1 Anderson 101. Denver 54 
(Mutamba 15). AssJste-Detraii 13 (Harter 31, 
Denver 28 (Andul-Rauf 10). 

New York a IS 32 73-H* 

Morn, » » U n- n 

NY: Ewing 7-12 »-* 21. Moson *7 Si 17.- S: 
Perkins 7-15 2-2 17, Porton 0-17 1-4 l*. Re- 
bounds— New York 53 1 Ewlno IB), Seattle 45 
(Com Kemo 8). AMls»-New York 23 
(Stork, Bl. Seattle 28 (Pavton. McMillan 5). 
Mkrneso to 1* 25 2* 73r- n 

LA dinner, * 31 M 3B-W3 

M: west 14-21 2-430. Loettner 7-154-518; LA: 
Manning B-M M 19, Homer 12-22 4-4 JT. Re* 

bBmas— Minnesota 53 iLaeimer UK Los A n- 
geies 4* (Harper B). Asslsts-MIrmesata 32 
(Williams 9). Los Anodes 2S (Jackson 71. 
New Jersey 29 31 28 32—120 

Golden State 12 22 38 18—108 

KJ: Coleman *14 7-8 19. Anderson 8-17 7-7 
24; G. Owns 7-10 2-4 16. Webber 8-15 5-7 21. 
Sprewcff 1 8-22 *-826. Rebounds— New Jersey 
8* (Brawn 17). Golden State <7 (Galling 8). 
Assists — New Jersev 20 (Edwards 51. Golden 
State 39 IMuWn 7). 


SI. Louis 

24 

18 

7 

S* 

Chicago 

22 

20 

6 

50 

Winnipeg 

ir 2 * 4 
Pacific Division 

40 

Calgary 

24 

19 

9 

S7 

Vancouver 

24 

23 

2 

SO 

Los Angela 

19 

XI 

6 

44 

Anaheim 

20 

» 

4 

44 

Son Jose 

16 

22 

11 

43 

Edmonton 

13 

31 

8 

34 


9* 181 185 
SO MS 138 
40 154 205 


S7 1*0 184 


44 147 165 
43 Ml 157 
34 1S> IBB 


Major College Scores 


Rabovods— PTioenlk SB (Miller 14). PMtodel- 
oMa 43 (Bradley 11). Assists— Phoeni* 27 
iE.P«rrv 9), Philadelphia 20 (Barra, Bl. 
Atlanta 14 28 25 38—117 

Charlotte 23 2B r 2S-1BS 

A: Wilkins 9-20 7-8 27. Willis 9-1584 24. Btov- 
foefc 9-15 B-fl 25; C: E -Johnson 8-20 2-2 21. Ba- 
ttue, 10-11 1-1 21. Hawkins 4-16 6-6 20. Re- 
bound*— Atlanta 53 (Willis Hi. Cnartotte SO 
(Ellis 10). Assist*— Atlanta B (Blavleck 61. 
Charlotte 23 iBooues H>. 

Miami If 28 K 28-108 

Orlando 27 21 24 25— 97 

M: Rice 15-22 0-0 34. SmWi 7-14 3-3 IB; O: 
Anderson 7-12 7-7 21. O'Neal 6-U 9-12 21. Re- 
baands— Miami 50 I Seiko tv 11). Orlando 46 
(O'Neal in. Assists— Miami 28 (Lena 6). Or- 
lando 20 (5klles 8). 

GoMen State 20 II >4 29— 91 

man 24 27 16 39-119 

G: GatHnoA97-iO 15. Jormlnw4.il W17; U: 
KJWalone 12-20 8-11 30. J Malone 12-17 2-3 27. 
Rebounds— Golden Stale SB (Owens 1 1 1. Utah 
63 (KJMalone fti. Assists— GoWen State (7 
(Johnson. Serewell 4). Utah 34 (Stockton 13). 
Milwaukee 34 18 31 15— M 

Chicago 38 » 19 39-1)3 

M: BakerB-137-* 21 Murdock 10-1S4-S 25; C: 
Plppen 10-19 7-8 3a Arm strong 7-15 2-2 17. 
Re Mu ods — Milwaukee 45 (Baker 191. Chica- 
go 49 (Plpoen. Gram B). Assl its— Milwaukee 
22 IMuraock ill, Cnkaga 34 (Plpoen 11). 
Detroll 19 20 48 IS— 97 

LA Lakers 37 25 B iB-ns 

D: Thomas 9-21 12-1531. Hunter 10-20 1-3 23; 
LA; Lvnch 8-1] 4-10 2a Thrcatt B-17 4-4 2a 
Reboun ds D etroit 44 (Anderson ULLosAn- 
pole, 70 (Lrnch 181. Assists— Detroit 19 (Du- 
mars 6|. Lm Angeles 29 (Van Exel 8). 
Minnesota 28 21 2fl 29— 91 

Portland 16 34 H 28-109 

M: Laottner 7-18 9-9 2XM.Wllllnm8 4-9 11-14 

21. Rider 917 1-2 20; P; B.wmicnw 64 H 15. 
c. Robinson 4-M 9-10 is. Reboands— Mtaneso- 
ta 45 (Lcettner 11). Portland 54 (^Williams 
101. Assists— Mlnnesfl to 25 (ALWlllloms Bl. 
Portland 23 (Strickland 9). 

MONDAY'S RESULTS 
Milwaukee 25 25 28 19—19 

Philadelphia 15 27 IS 34-94 

M: Brtckowskl 7-1 J H 17. Murdock *-19 *4 
23; P ; Weattemsoan B-134-420. Barrat H-20 1- 
2 28. ReMienas— Milwaukee 47 (Baker 1*1. 
Ohlladelpltio 57 IBorros 13). Assists— Mil- 
waukee 27 l Murdoch 10). PWtadelPnla 21 
(Hornacek 10). 

OrtSMo » 34 Si 38-182 

Washington 32 28 29 18— 99 

O: Anderson B-13 49 20. O'Neal 12-223-1027. 
Hordowov 7-16 UM4 24; W; GugllatTP 11-2148 
28, Cheamry 13-22 0-2 It, R abound*— Orlando 
51 I Anderson 111. Washington £2 iGugllotte. 
Mur wan 101. Asilite-OrtanocB ‘ Hardaway 
Bl. Washington 25 (Adam, 13). 

Miami 27 32 24 14-113 

Cleveland 23 22 24 29- 98 

M: Rice 12-16 3-3 ZB. Smith 7-15 2-2 18; C; 
Daubherty 3-6 10-14 16. Baffle M3 J-4 20. Re- 
bounds— Miami 85 (Seikaiv IS), Cleveland 33 
(Nonce*) Assists— Miami » I Lung B). Cleve- 
land 24 (Daugnerry 71. 

Sacramento 23 22 31 20—191 

Dallas 21 34 28 25— 1M 

S; Wilson E-i JGZ'B. Rlshmona 13-24 5-7 34. 
D: Masnburr- *-'• 4* is. Jackson 10-153-5 24. 
Redounds— Sacramento 43 (wiuon 10). Del- 
ia, «7 (wnite I4i. Ass/ste— Sacramento 33 
(Webb 9). Delia, 18 i Jackson 5). 

Indiana 29 28 32 30-119 

Neutron 24 39 28 29— 181 

I. 5mlis B-9 3-1 19. Miner 9-13 i-t 21; h: 
Otaluwon 13-20 W 77. ene 7*14 5-5 21. Re- 
bounds— Indiana 38 (A DavH 7). Hour tor 45 
(Otaluwon 121. Assfsie-indiono 33 (McKer 
8). Hoirifon 30 iCossett 6). 


FRIDAY’S RESULTS 
Columbia 47, Brown 46 
M an hatt an 98. Siena 73 
Ycte 65. Corned J* 

Idaho Si. 65, Montana 82 
Montana St. 74. Bade St. 72 

SATURDAY'S RESULTS 
EAST 

Boston College 70. Seton Hall SB 
Boston U. 83, New Hampshire 72 
Drexel 100. Vermont B7 
Fairfield 78. Ntagaro 72 
Fardnam BA Now 72 
George Mason Hi Amertoon U. 102 
Georgetown 77. Miami 41 
Holy Crass 99. Bucknell 98. OT 
Lafayette 95, Army 74 
Malm 79. Northeastern 47 
Md-Balttmore Countv 7A Win th rap 75 
Si. Bonavenhtre 72. Wert Virginia 64 
Temole 64. George Washington S* 
Tnnon St. 5A N.C-Ashevllle 45 
Wagner 79. SI. Franclx NY 49 
SOUTH 

Alabama 70. Mississippi st. 49 
Appalachian 51. 7A VMI 84 
Arkansas 65. Tennessee 84 
Centenary «a Stetson 73 
Ciemaon 95. N. Carolina St. 73 
Coartal Carolina 7A Campbell 71 
Duke 75. Maryland 62 
E. Kentucky 87. Mare head St. 78 
Eart Carolina 64, N.C-Wlimlngton 61 
Florida 75. Vanderbilt 48 
FiorMa St. 7A Georgia Tech 73 
Georgia 9X South Carolina B5 
Georota St. 77, somford 71 
Louisville 9A Va. Commonwealth 74 
South Alabama 73. Louisiana Tech 69 
Southern Miss. Bl Virginia Tech 74 
MIDWEST 

Creighton 82. SW Missouri St 48 
Detroit Mercv 66. Lo Salle 6S 
Evansville 95. Butler 93. TOT 
ill.-Chlcago 109. wrlghi St. Bs 
Kansas St 7A Iowa St. 70 
Miami, Ohio 77. Ball St. 59 
Michigan 79. Wisconsin 75 
Providence B2, Noire Dame 75 
Purdue 75. Minnesota 72 
Tulsa 99, Drake 10 
W. Illinois AA Cleveland St. S4 
WEST 

Arkansas St. 66. Art- Lime Rack 54 
Texas no. Houston 78 
Texas ABM 69. Southern Mem. 60 
Texas Tech V. Rice 72 
Arizona 10X Oregon St. 54 
Kansas 87. Colorado S3 
Washington St. 47, Washington 44 


FRIDAY'S RESULTS 

Boston 118-3 

N.Y. I standee 8 8 8-8 

First Period: B-OatesHiSweanevl. Second 
Period: 8-Oetes 17 f Neely. Juneau) Ipp); B- 
Neelv 34 (Oates). Third Parted: None. Shots 
on goat: B 6-T2AS— 26. N.Y. 34-18—17. Gool- 
ies-B. Case*. N.Y- HextalL 
San Jose 2 8 18-3 

Florida 1118-3 

First Period: SJ.-Lnrtonov 12 (GaraeMav. 
Ozofinsh): F -Murphy IO<Be(anaer,SenR(ng) 
Ipp); S-J.-Ozoilnsh 12 (Gorpenlov. Fa!iaon>- 
Seand Period ; F-KudefekJ 30 (Lomakin. Be- 
tonaer). Third Period: SwJ^Duchesne B (Fal- 
loon, Eilfc); F-Beianaer 12 iLomakta, Ku- 
delskl). Overlhne: Nam. Shots an goal: SJ. 
16-3-12-8-31. FB4r*-l— 24 Gartles— SJ- Irm. 
F, VanMoibrouck. 

St. Loai* 1 8 2— J 

Edmonton l • 1— * 

First period: SL-Mlltar 17 (Duchesne) 
(sh); E-MacTavish 12 1 QlousMn. Cloer). Sec- 
ond Period: None. Third Period; SL-Shona- 
han30(Jonney); SL-Shce>ahan3l (sh-en); e- 
DeBrusk 2 (MocTavIsh. Kravchuk!. Shots oo 
goal; S.L 1 V14-11— 3L E 134-12-30. Gaalla— 
SJ_ Hrhmak. E. Ranford. 

Now jersey * » • *-» 

Calgary 1 1 8 8—9 

nrsl Period: NJ.-Rlchori9,C-Watr6((tan- 

helm. Nletrwentfrii). Second Period ;C-F)eirv 

21 (Relchol); Nj. -Richer 20 (Ml Raw Stevens) 
(pp). Third Period: Nam. Overtime: Nam. 
Shots on goal: H J. 11-7-7-3— 28. C 15-7-13-0—35. 
Goalies— NJ. Bradeur. C Trefltav. 

H.Y. Roagers 0 2 8—2 

Anaheim 2 0 1—3 

First period; A-Corkum 77 lladooatar. 
Yoke) (pp); A-Swccmy 10 (Yoke) (pp). sec- 
ond Period: N.Y^Aessler17lKavaiev);N.Yr 
Mossier is. Third Period: A-Delias4 (Sacco). 
Shots 00 goo): N.Y. 7-14-9—30. A 12-15-10-37. 
Gortlee — N. y. Heatv. Richter. A. Hebert. 


None- Shots on goal: P*-i«-T— 22<T 19-T2-5- 
1-37. Gooites— p, wregget. T, Potvln. 
Ottawa 111 W 

Chicago 118 0-3 

Rrrt Period: C-EAutwr 5 (Grohan. Le- 
miemO; C-Cnrtkn to (Root**!.- O-Yashta 2L 
16:32. 3eo»a Period: O-Toigeon 6 (Shaw. 
Lamb); (po). C-J-rmleux 10 1 Graham); Third 
Period: O-Huttmwi t ILOwkx. Davydov). 
Overtime: Now. Sltotsm Bod: 07+6-1-21 c 
181VO-1— 35.GoaUe»-0.ailllnatan.CBoilour. 
SLUMil 2 2 2-d 

Calgary 7 7 W 

Flrn P*riod: C-Nltuwendvk 31 (Stera Rob- 
erts); 5L«Hull 32 (sh); SL-Huit 33 (Jonney, 
Crossman) (op), second Period: SL-Ou- 
cfyesne 2 (Cnasan. Shonohon): C-Yowney 3 
(Wole. McCarthy); SL-NUHar IB (Shanahan. 
Duriwsne) (op). Third Period: C-Reirtot 28 
(Laroso. Walz): SL-Boma 5 (Montgomery. 
Baron) (en). Stwt, an goal : S.L. 86-12—24. c 7- 
10-13— 3a Goalies— S.L. jasegtu C TrefUav. 
New Jersey 3 8 7—3 

Vancouver 3 7 3—4 

Fin, Period: NJ.-DrNer s (rtt); V-Buro24 
(Namestnlkov); NJ.*MocLean 22 (Stavgro. 
Driver) (pp); v-Lumme 7. Second Period: v- 
Cnurmai) 16 (Lummo. Ronning) (pp). Third 
Period: V-Sure 27 (Lumme, Carson) (bp); 
Nj^Stavens 1 1 (zetapukht) (pp); V-Crovon 9 
(Linden, Caurtnom; V-Clnden 28 (an). Shots 
on goal: N J. 12-11-15-3*. V 17-104-36. Goal- 
ies— NJ. TerrerL V. Whitmore. 

Anaheim 8 8 l—l 

Los Angelas 8 2 3-d 

First Period: None. Second Period: l_A.- 
RoMtaille 28 (Gretzky. S on drtr om ) (pp); 
LJL-Bkrtce 12 (RaHtaffle. Kurrl) (bp). T hird 
Period: UL-Scnstram 17 (Watters, RotoL 
talita); LJk-MeEochern 8 (DormeUr, ZhB- 
nlk) : Uk-Wart B I Watters. Houda) ; A-Cara- 
back 8 (Oourb). Shots on goal: A 15-13-18— 4A 
UL 4-18-20—42. Goalies— A. Hebert. Tugnutt. 
LA. Hrudev. 


Zetanskata, Russia. 138; B. Rfttate Gaetsrii. 
Austria 108; 8. Street, 87; W, Land. 75. 

overall World Cop s t and in gs (oiler 33 
mats); l.vrenl Schneider. Swltzertana 1019 
Paints: 2. Pemilla Wtbefg, Sweden. 1003; 1 
Anita wa ch ter. Austria BN; A Uli-lke Mater. 
Austria 711; & Seizingcr, 4«; 6, Deborah 
ConaoenonL Italy. 882; 7, Martina era Get- 
many. 48*,- A Marianne Kloerstad. Norway, 
432 ; 9 , Urofca Hrayat. 5 tawmta. 397 ; K. Moreno 
Gaiilria Italy. 395. 

Freestyle Skiing 


Results Saturday ofwortd Cnpeneoal Ming 
competition In Le-Rtkrti, Canada: 

MEN 

1, Jean-Luc Btwara Canada 2633 patats; 
2, Oi frier Aiwnnl Franca 26-30; X Edgar 
GtasPiroa France. 2*31; A Dominick Gouth- 
tar. Canada 26-15; 5. O Brier Cotta. France. 
25.98; A Jorgen PoalarvL Sweden. 2SA8; 7, 
Anfnony Hcmery, France, 25.73; X SMPtwm 
Raenaa Canada. 2SA9; *.jurg Biner. Switzer- 
land. 2A«7; IX Fabtan Bertrand. Franc*2A23. 

world Coo Standings: l. GtaKdron, 384 
points.' i. BraMOrtt 380) X Strgal SttaPtanov, 
Ruxrta 384; A Cotta. 3SI; X Ailomand, 324; A 
Paalorvi, 296; 7. John Smart, Canada 28B; x 
Seat Smith, U^. 276; 9. Craig Rodman. U£. 
266; IX Bertrand. 264. 

WOMEN 

1. Donna wetabroriit. UJu 2A11 points; X 
Candles Gtfg. France, 2XM; XSMne Una Hat- 
testad. Narwav. 25- 02 : A Ludmila Oym- 
chenka. Rusrta 24JB; X Rnphoalle Monoa 
France. 24-61; A ToDana Mmermarer. Ger- 
manr.2A34 ; 7, Branwtn Thomm, Delta. Cana- 
da 2A30; X Birgit StahvKeppier. Germany. 
2383; 9. Yvonne Seifert. Germany, 2X53; W. 
Aim Banellx U A. 2382. 

World cw Standings: 1. Wetabrod*, 400 
ootnts; Z Hattaetad.368; X Mfflermayor.340; 
4MMN9WMMMN; BUHonoMMf 7, Uz 
Mcintvrs. United States 300; x Dvmrtumka 
284: 9. Silvia Marckmdl, Italy. 2B0; IX Petra 
Maroder. Italy. 264. 


Eduard BurmWnw. Russia 1 J1.MB U&775- 
55J75); 8, Duncan Kennedy. US* 1:513*3 
BjR jUS). 

Orenrfl tfanfidgs: 1. Frock, M0 points; l 
Kennedy. 148; X HaeW.HI; A Wendel Sudum. 
US. 139; 5- ScZimldL 133; XGielrariwr. 122; 7. 
A. Huber. 112; XJera Mueller, Germany, 108; 
9, Rene Frledl, Germany, 96. 

WOMEITS SINGLES 

I, Com my Atvfer. US. I mlnaf, 2338* sec- 
onds (4A2SM4JB9 seauids); Z Jana Bade. 
Germany. 1:28880 (44J32-ttJM>; X Darts 
Nnmr, Au»trta, i:3U0i (4USMA04U) A 
Natalya YcdaidMflkx Ukralnx lASD. 
(44816-44.114); X Natalie ObMrcher, Italy. 
1 :2X552 (4A371-4A181) ; A Sort ErdtMBV Ger- 
many. 1:2X578 (44853-4X926)) 7. AngtKka 
Nwncr.Austrta.1 : 2*874 (448464X225); X An- 
area Tagwerker. Austria 1:2*540 UA431- 
44407); 9. svlke Otta Germceiy, 7.-2XJ84 
(44559*44825); ML Erin Worroa UA.1 -39057 
(4A7994A25B). 

Dwirtdf Boa) sHmWtar. b Oe» KoMisdv 
Germany, Bl points; X Bode. SLX Itta) Errt- 
manaondTa0wertmr8O;X(lta)GerdoWW»- 
senstalner. I Mhr. AJMuner, and Mylar. SS; X 
DJlauner. 9; 9, Yakuehenka SOL 
MEITS DOUBLES 

1. Tobias ScMegFAAariuis SditagLAwoMa 1 
mtacita. 2X057 second) lu.tiChO.rn sec- 
ond) 1:2. Kurt Bnieaer-WDfrtad HUber, Italy. 
1 : 2X162 (AU69-4A293); XFrank-Petar Bgrao- 
kew-Smetro Zetw. Germany. 13X355 (44 3**- 
44JT71); A ObIs Tharae-Gorcfi Sheer. UA, 
l:2X5Bl (4AM544JB6); & loo uraanskMn- 
droi Muctaa Ukrrtne,iaX646 (44853440131 ; 
A Wes Mankei-Thomas Rudotaa <3etmom>, 
1:2X728 (44872-44256); 7. Yves Ctav-Bob 


Eb Wins With Dubai Course 

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (Af) jJSaStoga final 

theDnbai Desert Ctasacgotf title Sunday by ax b<jai by three 

round 1 -under-par 71 far a four-round total ^ co mmon Darcy* 
strokes the I990oodise record of 64 set by Sfeishcd sec- 

Greg Nonnan of Australia, the pre-ioumamfflt lavOTK 
ond, wh five birdies on the back nine for a round _ ___ Ride 
• Andrew Magee; winner of the prewous ^ 

Fdir and Dan Foreman were tied for die lead going J (AFP) 

round of the Phoenix Open. 


NFL to Consider Changes to Game 

M . ... V, r: .i~.ii r Mimes labor 


ATLANTA (WP) r-'im 

problems settled, expansion overfor now and la rooro 

f t 

tK* NFTt cnmnefition committee soOT wowu 


loan AMplpf-Uria. CaseL Remada 1:29499. 
(4485^44806). 

OvaraH Hoal s t on d tagst 1. Stctan Kroaso- 
Jan Bahroodt G e rm an y. 95; X Schtaot- 


Dngirtpr lheprtMirtiliryof a two-pom imubww.w"-- 

scrimmage back a yard for the defense -because the proximity to me 
quarterback is enhancing blitzing defenses.'' 

Orioles Get New Relief in Lee Smith 


it Lee 
to a 


World Cup Skiing 


SpeedSkatlng 


Sditaol. 71; X Staffer! SW-Stattan Woeflar. 
Germany. *5; A Thor n e 8 h «ir, 40; X Mano- 
Joero RntfHtoiHort Huber, Italy, 58; A Apop- 
MlOrPOI. 48; Brvmsr-Hottsr. 39: * Monkri- 
Rudoipasx 




i* --T 5 


NHL Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
AHontlc Division 



W L 

TPhCF 

BA 

N.Y. Rangers 

32 13 

3 

67 177 IB 

New Jersey 

27 16 

6 

40 175 

137 

Philadelphia 

24 22 

3 

51 179 

in 

Florida 

20 17 

10 

50 137 

10 

Washington 

21 24 

4 

4* 1S2 

154 

Tampa Bay 

19 % 

6 

44 133 

152 

N.y. islanders 

17 25 

3 

3* 140 

143 

Northeast Division 



Pittsburgh 

24 13 

11 

59 177 

146 

Boston 

24 16 

9 

57 M2 

14J 

Montreal 

0 19 

8 

54 1S5 

144 

Buffalo 

23 21 

S 

51 161 

134 

Quebec 

20 24 

5 

45 164 

17J 

Hanford 

17 2* 

3 

39 148 

17* 

Ottawa 

» 34 

7 

25 135 

01 

WE5TERN CONFERENCE 



Control Dtvhtan 




W L 

T PH GF OA 

Taranto 

28 14 

10 

64 177 

1*5 

Detroit 

0 IS 

3 

61 218 

143 

Dallas 

27 19 

7 

61 184 

14* 


SATURDAY'S RESULTS 
WVmbteg 1 • o-» 

Dot rod 2 I 4—7 

First period: OChePpon) 31 iChkmoaCof- 
tav) (pp) ; W-TkoUnik 27 (Emerson. Merorwv) 
(pp): D- Fedorov B (Sheppard). Socona Peri- 
od: D-!Riepooro32 (PrlmaaaChlasaon). Third 
Period: D-Koztov 24 (Fedorov. Cotfev); D- 
Koztov 25 (Fedorov); D-Sheppord 33 (Lld- 
•trom. Yzerman); D-Lapofeita 4 ICottav). 
Shota on goal: W4-)I«-aO IS-T2S-3XGoaF 
ies-W. Eksensa. D. Osgood. 

Buffalo 1 3 8-3 

Montreal 2 0 8-2 

First Period: M-Ronan 2 (Rooerga. Wil- 
son); B-Mav 12 (Haw e rchuk. Audafta); M- 
Brtseboial (KoanxDlonata) (no). Second Pe- 
riod: B-Hawerdiuk 21 (Auden*. May); B- 
Smohlik n (Mav. Hawerchuk). TMrd Period: 
Nona. Shots on goal: B 6-KF6-22. M n-io- 

9— 30 Goalie*— B. Hose* 17-114. M. Roy. 

wasMntaa I 1 3-* 

Philadelphia 0 0 3—0 

Pint period; w-Hotcher 7 (BondraJonoro- 
sen) (pp). Second period: W-Hatchar 8 (Krv- 
atar.JahansMnl.TUrd Period: P-Undras24 
[Br Irta Amour, Rocchl); P-Undros2s (Ren- 
earo. GoUev); W-Cata 4 (Hunter. KonewoF 
chuki; W-RHley 17 IHatdwr. Minor) (rtt-en). 
Shots an goat: W 1X1X8-31. P B-7-5-2X GocJ- 
to— W. Beau pro. P, Roussel. 

Quebec 2 a 1-3 

Hartford • 2 8-9 

FhW Poried: OGvaorov4 ITwML Basson); 
OMCKea 3 ( Fraser, Young) Ipp). Second Pe- 
riod: H-SandenonX) (Nvlandor); H-PronoS 
(Patrick, Zataaskl) (pp). Third Period: O- 
Lnschyshvn2 (Young. Ricci). Shots on goal: G 

10- 3-10—23. H X11-9— 2X Gooitas— Q.Thlbault. 
H. Burke. 

Now York 1 t 0-1 

Boston ■ 8 3-9 

First Period: NY -Green 13 (Flahey. La- 
chance). Second Period: None. Third Per tad: 
B-OatK 18 (Wesley. Bourque) (nal; B-Smo- 

I Irak 1 16 (Sweenev. Sou roue], Shota an goal: 
H.V. 0-11-7-44. B 12-14-17—41 GOO lies— N.Y, 
McLennan. B, Rlendeau. 

Son Jose I 8 l-HI 

Tempo Bay 0 18—1 

First Ported: SJ.-Odgors 9 (Gaudrow. 
Silk) (pp). Second Period: T-Kllmo 20 (Cota. 
Grattan). Third Period; SJ.-Duchesne 9 
(Bilk. Fadoon). SBflta on ooat: SJ. 7-7-7-71. T 
9-14-14—37. Goalies— SJ, Irbe. T. Pupoa. 
DaUas 1 1 W 

Edmonton 2 8 1—3 

Pint Period: E-PeersonmRlce); E-B«v 
nett 3 (Wetoit. Rice); D-N. Broren 13 (la- 
dyaiUGagner). second Ported: D-EvcsaniO 
(Tinardl. Donienl (pp). Thbd Period: D- 
Courtraii 14 (Modana Hatcher;: D-GMchriss 

II ( McKOtaie. Ludwig ) : D-Ladvard? (pp): E- 
Deflrus* 3 (MaeTavIsh. Bennett). Shots an 
goal: D *-8-18-27. E 15-186—31. Gopltes-Q. 
Moog. E. Ranford, 

Pfftaburgh 2 3 8 8-4 

Taranto 1 3 8 8-4 

First Petted : P-Multan 27 ( Francis) ; T-An- 
dreychuk 40 (Gllmour); P-Mulltn 25 (Ncv 
tend. Francis); T-Bora 4 (Rouse. Mironov;. 
Second Ported: P-Pot»roan 2 (Murphy); T- 
Borg 5 IZanLOsMrnoi; T-Glimour 17 (Boro, 
ciwvskv. AndrarOtekl; P-Froncta 18 (Nos- 
lutaLMulien). TPtfti Ported : None. Overtime: 


MEN’S DOWNHILL 

ResutttetdoeranHl race wttti a length o(XJ 
UkmtateninX845(teUandadrapof87Brto- 
tars a*5lfeef) In ataiRontafFraacs: 1, Kletii 
Andre Aomodf. Norway. 1 minute 5*35 sec- 
onds; X Jean- Luc Crofter, Franca. 1-8*81; X 
Homes TrlnkL Austria. I :SXI7; A Helmut Hon- 
flrtmer. Austria 1:5X*S; X LiAcI Col furl. iMy. 
I -J33t: a WllDam Basse. Switzerland. 1 :SU8; 
7. Luc Ajphmi France. I J92I; X Marc Giro r- 
delll. Luxembourg. 1 ^9JB; 9, Patrick Orttelb, 
Austria. 1 :S*4i; IX Franco Cavsrgn. Swttzer- 
tamt 1*5X45 

Staaatags la me event: l. GlrardeilL 402 
points; xOrtlteb.376; X TrlnkL 276; A Basse. 
25* ; X AomodL 218; A Core Mullen. Canada. 
284; 7. Daniel Mobrer. Switzerland. 202; X 
Cretier . 187; 9. Tommy Moe. U.5,177; IX A tie 
SkaoTOal. Norway, 17A 

Resuns Suadar of msnl rtafom race. eNIO a 
drop of 203 meters (445 Met) In Chamonix. 
France; (Him of each run and total time): 


SLALOM 

1, Alberto Tom bo. Italy. 159.42 
1:01 JS seconds) 2 mlnutax 0137 seconds; X 
Tomas Foadax Sweden. (1:0X32 • 1:1002) 
2:0134; x (tie) Thomas Sykora, Arabia 
(1:0X84 - 1:01.94) 2:02TB; Jute Koslr, Siowe- 
nla. (1 rOJ 3t- J:oiJ4}2:OZ7t:i FlmUtrtiDan 
Jooee. Norway, (1:011)1 - 1:01.931 2:0234. 

A Sebastian Amlez. France (T:01JB< • 
1:0144) 2:0321; 7. Peter Rath. Get man y. 
(1:0133 • 1:01.91) 2:0344; X V«a Dlmtar, 
France (1:B2J1 ■ 1:0)46 ) 2:0334; 9. Armln 
Bittner, Germany. (1:0131 - 1:8310) 2:0381: 
IX Andrea ZlnsiL Switzerland. (1:8132 • 
1:022) 2:0134. 

Statem StaRdlnn (after seven races): 1. 
Tomba, 440 points; 1 Thomas Stmseamlnesr, 
Austria 422; 1 JagpA 389: A Koslr, 341; X 
Foooae. 272; x Srtiara, 23*; 7. D erma rd 
Gi train, Austria 220: X Aomodt, 215; 9, Ota 
Christian Funoetn. Norway. 71 1 : IX Roth.191 


Rosetta from (he world sartofspedd skuflpg 
chnwaioeihtas In Oateorr. Canada: 

MEN 

500 metres: 1, Dan Jansen, U3, 3536 sec- 
onds; X Htnmni Shimizu. Japan. 3835; X 
Sergei Kievchenta. Russia. 3839; A Janlchl 
maun, japan. 3841; X Kim Yaon-Man, South 
Kama 3X56; 4 Grande Ntos, Norway. 3X57; 7, 
Almtander Golubev. Rwrta9840i X ml Horn 
BaCWna 3802; BTWM4 Kurehw. Japan. 
3833; IX Kevin Scott, Canada, 3*37. 

1300 metres: 1. Ktevrtwnla. 1 minute 1255 
seconds; X Inoue. 1 :1X84; X Iser Zhelezovskv. 
Belarus. 1:12T2; A Joraen. 1:1334; X Gerald 
van Vows, Netherlands, 1 :W0; X Tartihrukl 
Kuratwa Janan, 1:1338; 7. Patrick tcmly. 
Cmada 1:1340; X Scott, 1:1X33; 9, Shimizu. 
I: IX7Z; IX Sylvgtti Bouchard, Canada t:I3JX 
WOMEN'S 

5M metres: 1. Bonnie Blair, LI 3, 3939 sac- 
onde; X Suion Audi. Canada, 3951; XXu Rul 
Hong. China 3934; A You SutHtae. South Ko- 
rea 3939; X Yq Qlaobo. CMna 3951 1 X Anaoto 
Hour*. Germany. 3933; 7, Monique Gar- 
brecht. Germany. 3935; X Svetlana Boiar- 
kina Russia 39 JO; 9. Kyafco Shbnazofcl. -to- 
pan, 4X00 ; IX BabiM Voikor, GormaTV,4XU; 

1398 metres: I. Blair, I minute T8J8 sec- 
onds: X You Sun-Hoe. 1:19T1; X Hawk 
1 : 19 TV; A Emese Hunyody, Austria,) :)9JX* X 
MDioata Daxalu, Romania 1:)9J7; A SMhe 
Kraunasx Jtmon, 1^X00; 7. G or brechl 
1:2X17; X re Qiaobo 1:2043; 9, Anke Bator. 
Germany. 1:2X51; IX xu Rut Hons. 1:2X72. 

Bobsled 


SOCCER 


(Mad States 1. Russia I 

B4CUSH FA CUP 


CartSil 1, Manchtdsr CBy 0 
Ourttcn X Btaddwm 0 
Ontsee 1. Shebtata WMnodey 1 
Grtnshr 1, Aston vtoa a 
taswUi X Tonenhom 0 

1, Redon 0 
1. Luton 1 
warts Cbuntv 1. West Heml 
OkSwm X Stoke 0 
Odord 1 Leeds * 

Ptymouih X Barratart 
pm Veil X Wdves 2 
Stockport w Brhlol C*y - nostoorad 
Wkrb te ton X Sunriotend 1 
NoraUi CBy X MpncMSNr Urilsd 2 


BALTIMORE (AP) — The Baltimore Orioles signed free age* 
Smith 36, mmor lcaoie basdjafl’s all-time savK leader with «Jil. 
one-ycar contract paying SU maKon, a move that ^ 

that Gregg Olson, the team's aD-tnne saves leader, wffl not retnm tor uk 

1 ^to < San Guzman agreed earlier to a $3.8 mOw®* t yj SS* 
tract with the Toronto Blue Jays,althouA he wouldn t have 
for arintradon until next winter. Dave ftaideison and the Kansas uqj 
Royals agreed to a one-yearcoatract worth abootSl mflhon, condiuoneo 
on mm passing a physiol exam. * ' . ^ 

Los Angeks Ditchers Kevin Gross and Ramon 
catcher Chad Kxeata, Montreal pitcher Chns Nabhoix and Boston 
pitcher Jose Melendez agreed to arbitration settlements. 

For the Record 

Camay Mykr stunned Europe’s top higeis Sunday hi Altenberg, 
Germany, as she became ibc first Amen can woman to win a Wwld Lup 

— .-a!o!p^p wt.pi JllA ma Um iVb tmif’o DsacAn fmolp KpffWT 1 fllC T.ill^UDQlBCr 

(AP) 


01 


Aflrtks Madrid XVBtendoa 
ArtiMcBBbPOA LtaMbB 
Rodng Santandsr X Laoranes Q 
Real Oviedo 1. Carta 0 
Real VrttadoH X RM4 Madrid a 


COMBI NEP 

I, Kletli Anon Aomodt. Norway, n J835- 
2:05.771 4:GA12; X Lasse Kira. Norway. 
(2:0X08-2:0533) 4 :0U3i X Harold Strand-NIF 
son. Norway (2:0X1 1 - 2:0573) 4:B7J4; A Tom- 
my Mm. U3. C:S953 - 2:093*1 4:0931: & Ed 
Podlvlnsity. Catioda (1 :59JD-2:1150 ) 4: 11.10: 
A A Mo Skamrtoi. Narwav (1:5*31 • 2:1X27) 
4: 1135: 7. Stave LrOtar. Swttkertend 12:045- 
2:1*40) 4:1247; A Morsel Suffloaar. Swl t zor - 
kM (2:0X91 - 2:1X23) 4:1121; *. Lora Amo- 
ion, Norway 12:01.12-2:1224)4:1X3*; >& Wit- 
ty Ralno. Canada (2:0435 - 3:0X85) 4:135X 

Ovorxrti standings after Sondoyta evonta: l, 
Aomodt. 1087 points; X Girentoil!. 735; X 
Guomtat Macw. Austria 896; A Tomod. 684; 
X Klua. 454; x Jan Eioar Thoraon. Norway, 
431: 7. Srangosslmmr. 421; X Trlnkl. 421: 9, 
Koslr, 411; IX Bernnard Grtrebi. Austria 394. 


WOMEN’S DOWNHILL 
Results Sa tur day of dow nhill In Qq rmjsdB- 

Itolr, 1 minute- «JN soconds; X Melonta Su- 
eftrt. Fronro. 1 :446a: X Miawita Ruffivoa 
Canada ': «4.75: A Barbara Merlin. Italy, 
1 : 454)1. 5. Jeanette Luwje. Norway. 1 :4530; x 
Aletuca Dovzcn. Steveria 1:4541: 7. Ploobo 
Street. US. 1.-4JJ7; x Spate Prettier. Slove- 
nia. i:«558: ». Mjehoeio G«rg-Loltnor. Got- 
mow. 1:45.90: ‘.X Not nolle Bouvtar. France. 
1:4*117. 

Steadings In ffl* event (alter 4 everts): 1. 
(tie) Katie Seizing er. Germany. 232 ond Kate 
Pace, Canada. 233 points; x VeraNka Smil- 
matar. Austria 157; AAnlaMaax Austria 152; 
X Suetwt, 143; i. Kosmer. t»; 7, Worwara 


FOUR-MAN 

ToPWrtrttatgolAtnopbobe l edrooe Sun d nY. 
Iasi of 5 events on At leonrt tear te St 
Moms; (oeoreorte Nme for two Malt}: 1. 
S witzerl an d I (Gustav Weber. Donat Acklfrw 
Kurt Meter, Domenico Semo raro ). 2 minutes, 
55* seconds; X Austria l (Hubert Schoetstr, 
Gerhard RedL Thomas Sdmif, Gerhard Hef- 
doriwr). 2:0175; X Britain I (Mark Tout, 
George Farrell, Jason wing, Lenny Paul). 
2:05.90; A Swffzwtand it (Otrioflan Mo til 
Rene StfimMwInv, Gerry LoerHIer, Christian 
Raich). 2:0635. 

5. Germany I (Dirk Wtate. Otriaiopti 
Bartsch. Michael Detonator. Wolfaane 
Haunt), 2:0857; A Canoda I (Pierre Luadart. 
Dave McEachem. Jack Prc. Pancal Caron). 
2:0X13: 7. Germany II (Christoph Lonnoa 
Guenther Eger. Peer JaeriwL Jaerg Huber), 
2:0X33; X Germany III (Stephan Batch, 
Frank SOmabet. Oliver Fetaea Thomas 
Plotter), 2:0843; 9. Austria II (Kurt Eto 
Derger. Thomas Bataiiar, Caratan Nertwte. 
Martin Scnrafzonouar), 2:0X74; IX Brltate 1 1 
(Soon Oieson. Jen Herbert. Doan Wart. Paul 
FteW), 2:0859. 

FteaHttarttotskittMOvgal: 1.Sctioqinr,129 
palntsi X Wiese. 131; X Tout, 122; A Luodore. 
107; 5 . MOHL 107; X Quis Lori, Canadx 102; 7, 
Randv WI1L U3. 93; X Mm. 84 : 9, HaroW 
Cartel, Genwpir. 84; )X einborgor, 79. 


ZtaMOte X Ronl SododPd B 
XAtonatal 
AMflCu MPtete X Vatanda o 
Torartfe X R*vo vs l hup w 1 
Depontm corora X {poring GBon 1 
Steodlnssr Ooperttvo Coruna, 33 points: 
Barcelona, * Rwttng Gilen. 3fe Reel Ma- 
drid. 2S Altiteetc BBbao. 2A Real teiera 
sqvfllp. Alb ace re, Rad ns Santander. Real 
Ovtado ana Rad Sodadad, Zb AMfco Mo- 
unt Tenertto and Vteends 2R Lovorias end 
Rpyo VOBacM IBC CaOa. Vti Rto Vafindo- 
EkL 1* Ohm. 1* Larlda, IX 

DUTOi PHOT DMBON 
N AC Breda X FC Tworte Btadtada 1 
OA. EkgCta Detente- X Rods JC Karfcrade » 
SC I Nwwwee n 1, FC utmd* 0 
MW MasiMdt X Scarta Rdtentem 0 
Wfltem U TOaag 1, PSV Bndhpvan 1 
FC V u tamta m I, VW Menlo 1 
FCGrodngte X camhuur Loauworeen 2 
A to> Ai iu tanto m X VIMms Amtem I 
Feyenoord Rtatardem 1, RKC WUtaBk 1 


after a meeting with Mark Miles, chief executive officer 
of the ATP Tour, said that December’s remarks highly critical of drag 
testing an the men's tennis tour had been “out of context ana mismter- 
pretei” r (APi 

Wasner Canazwo, the foimer rcfercdngdirector of. the Rio de Janeiro 
soccer federation, has been banned for one year following the conclusion 
erf the first <rf three investigations into the matter. (Reuters) 

Rod Davfe <rf Australia beat Thieny Prooaoet of Fiance; three races to 
two in the best-of-fivc final, to win his third Australia Cup racing regatta 
title in four years. (Reuters) 


• Hi 


athletes look like a sham.” 


Steadiest! Atax Amsterdam, 34 points; 
Fo y inoord Rotterdam. 11,’ Vitesse Antham 
and PSV Efodbovaro m Rada JC Noritroae 
told NAC Brads, B Wtewn 11 Ttewg. 7t FC 
Twtnta enchada. 71 1 VW Vatao. M Sparta 
Roltardam and Go Ahead Eoates Doronter, lk 
MW M tes iri d d ana SC Ito o ronws n . Ik PC 
ItaMrt. Uf FC Groninoar, T» FC VotandBm, 
Ilf RKC Wb a ste te . * Camhuur Loararardin. 7. 


Lacas X Sarapdorta of Ganoa 3 
mpo* l, Ruma 1 
Pteama X Rasotena 7 
Urines* 1, item 1 

ItHiffmr- Mian, a paMc Somnterte rad 
Juradux 2X PaRML 2h biter. 29 La*. Mnoa 
rad Torino. 2* rura l * . Roma and CariterL 2S 
Ptscaioa. IX Oo m awra . W Udkrato 17! Ras- 
Otana and Ganoa, 1* Atalartp. 15! USX X ' 


sccgno msT - 
tedlo as. Sti Lortn 
SotenWto b BonpaJorx India 
India first Inning* 541-5 
Sri Lanka first Inn tegs Bl 


Sri Lonka second Innings; 215 


TRANSACTIONS 


GOLF 


MMBALL 


PubalDg— itCtaMjc 


Luge 


Rasalls of nii «NkMn wsrid cun tow 
comoo tta a hrid ol JUtanbrax oramany: 

MEN’S SINGLES 

I. Mortem prock, Austria, 1 minute, 5X213 
seconds (5X45544775 soconds); X Arnold 
Hubor. Italy. 1:50594 (S93434A8U); X Georg 
Horn Germany. 1:5X459 (555384X121); A 
Markus Schmidt. Austria. 1:30564 (554S1- 
55.053); X Norbort Huber, Italy. 1 JX7» 
(55737-48080); X WltfriM Hirttr, Italy, 
1:SX1«7 (555334X144); 7, Gerhard 

Gtalrachar. AMtria. 1 :S07I4 (S5K04&21 1 >; X 


ten X Part saw-Carmnte 2 

Bantam* 1. teW-etanno 2 
Lrorr I, . m a ra na 0 
Wrtprir 1 , ttarta* 0 
mraourg X La hw» 3 
Sodtaux 1, Cm 1 
Angara 1, Lam 2 
Matt X Merited** 0 
LBto X Teutauj* 0 

Standings! Paris St Gortnaln. 3* potati; 
Marsafflx 34; Bgrdsaux, 29; Montnailkr. » 
AUtarra. 27; Nantes, 28’ Stntwouro. Cnmoa 
and Lyon, an Monaco and « E Itenne. U/ 
SoriBRM ond Lank, a Mtfz. n: Lkta and La 
Havre. 2k Martteuas and Cara. l*z Anpara 
and Toutouta, n. 

rTAUAN PBtST DIVISION 
Ataianta of Bnann X AC Mara 1 
Genoa X Perm* 4 
Intai i pg l on ita ot MBra X CBoBari 3 
Juvantus of Hate X Fooota 8 


ntftaXItoTOrd 


UAKHomon par-71 Rirtratas Gatf C m: 
Eriiln e& South Africa 8W*4Wlri(l 
Grog Norman, Auatralin * » 6 9 4 8 4M 74 
WaynoWsshiar. Sooth Africa 7WB4MM7S 
Jonathan Lomax Endand 88-7X70-47-27* 
leas AokL Japan •' S7-7SWW6 

Tsukan Watanabx Japan 787847-4M74 
Par-UlrBc Johansson. Swodm 7871-69-47^77 
Gory Evans, Enotend sJ^X/WB-W 
Craig Camus, enotend *MF6X7»OT 
Kla* Eriksson. Swadan 6849-7WM7I 


CRICKET 


THIRD CRICKET TEST 
A astro Ra vs. Sontti Afrtco 
sttadoy, In Adskflda 
Australia tint kteings; 4*9-7 
South Africa Ural barings: 235-7 (110 over*) 


COLLEGE 

TEXAS AIM-Nomad Tommy TobarvDta 
datanslva coordinator and Slav* Ensmlngar 
aftonshn caonflnatar. 

TEXAS TECH— Tracy SauL basketball 
guard, toft teem 

VALDOSTA ST/~Extented contract of Hal 
Mummx tootboH aaadi. tor 3 yaora tltrougli 
1997. 

VIRGINIA TECH— Nomad Gary Tranquil 
offensive coordinator. 

. VMI— Named Tom Throckmorton defen- 
sive coordinator; Mika Clark q u ortorboOs 
coach; Denny HamRiarsctimidt drtanstvo 
backs cooch; BUI Lees aftensivg Ore coach; 
Gaanto Rob rurnino flocks coach; and flotrtv 
floMarftdi datensiv* I tea coach. 


DEXNIS THE MENACE 


PEANUTS 


CALVIN AND HOBBES 


m ft JT TWT I a*t R BMl 
ACW®ntA6 FW3M 
25 TEWS AGO. BUT r CM* 
R 94 WBR VWiT I JUST _ 
«SOT UP TO t»? 


1 befile" 


mii 

■H 

| VERYUP 

m 

inui 

n 



~~i~A‘rnrrrnja 



S^U- 




’* Write 




V’tiA * 




Quotable 

w a member of the LSU Athletic Councfl, on why 

i O’Neal win never be m the school's hall of fame; “He not only 


Shnnoilfe O’Neal wCfl never hem the fidmoi’shflU of fame: He not only 
Hirin Y get a degree, 7 ’ which is mandatory, "he left in (be middle of die 
semester after his last season. It makes our ibetoric about educating 




I- 

r- 


*-i- 

*3 


BALTIMORE— Started Lae Smith. Oltaier. 
to l-yoor contract. 

BASKETBALL 

maternal BokrtbaH Aaroctetkai 
CLEVELAND— Signad Joy Guldtegar, ten- 
ter. to second 10-day contract. 

DALL AS Act No ted Tony Campbell. 
gvanHorward, from telury Hat 



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A na — tahdiwroibriBiaMMtai — 
OXMnO 


TO QUR READERS 
IN ALBANIA 


Hand delivery 
is no*v available 



Just call (42) 23 502 

pendenl Albanian 


'Indepei 
Economic Tribune' 


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■ -^-1 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 1994 


Page 19 



Toraba, Pains and Al, 
Gets 3d Slalom Victory 

a im.vli cm his firsi V 


The Aisociatri Pm* Fifth was Finn 

CHAMONIX. France — Al- of Norway wth suipnaneFrenco 

berto Toraba. the loser five days run. 

earlier to a squash court wall, won had the best tunera 
f^°Sworld Cup slalom 1:01-44 io T ombas 1.01-9? 


MAIER: Au.aian r rr2^lS2 ““ 

“In fact she"Wai highly motivated and eager 1*!^™ while ona ski outing with a 
, race.” he said. ' _ . r^wlnns vear. Gemot Rein- 


Delln 


auauaj J uK-ii j --r — 

race despite bis aching shoulder. 

The stocky Italian took the lead 
with his fust run and hdd onto it 
with a final time of 2 minutes. 1.37 
seconds- 

Tomas Fogdoe of Sweden was 
second in 2:02.34. Jure Kosir of 
Slovenia and Thomas Sykora of 
Austria tied for third at 2:U-.7S. 

“I had a large pain in my shoul- 
der last night," Tomba said. "1 onlv 
decided mis morning to run. 
couldn’t warm up properly, and 
look an injection for ihe pain.’ 

He is the only Alpine skier to wm 
consecutive Olympic gold medals 
in the same event, the giant slalom 
tides in 1988 and 1992, and he won 
the slalom gold medal in 1988. 

He has not won a giant slalom 
this season but moved into the 
overall lead in the slalom standings 
with 440 points off three slalom 
victories, plus a second and a thud 
in the seven races this season. 

Thomas Stangassinger of Aus- 
tria. the slalom leader before the 
race, dropped to second. He was 
just 15th after the first run. 

News of the death of Amman 
Ulrike Maier in Garmisch-Parten- 
Irirchen. Germany, had reached 
Chamonix early Saturday evening. 


But the Italian was the only skier 
under a minute in the first run, 
59.42 while Araiez. starting in the 
36ib slot, was 14th in 1:01.77. 

After the first run, Tomba bent 
over in pain. After the second run 
he just rubbed his shoulder. 

“There was some pain at the be- 
ginning of ihe first run when 1 
10U f" pushed loo hard and at the third 
only g^e I even shouted." he said. 
Lfl- I whv vah «*w me N snd over 


“That’s why you saw me bend over 
after the first run. On the second 
run it was OJc." 

Kietil Andre Aamodt added to 
his overall lead by winning the 
combined race. He wop SatuMay^S 
downhill and was 21st in the slalom 
race. The times are added together 
for the combined event. 

Five-time overall champion 
Mare Girardelli of Luxembourg, m 
second place, hooked a gate and 
fell during the first run. 

The men’s next race, a downhill, 
is scheduled to be run m Gaimwcb- 
Partenkirchen next Saturday. 
However, the course was closed 
Sunday as an invesugauon was 
conducted into Maier’s death, and 
a decision on the men's race was 
expected to be made by midweek. 


Aamodt got his first World Cup 
downhill victory Saturday in what 
he hoped was a good omen for next 
month’s Olympics in his home 
country. 

He was limed in 1:58.35 seconds, 
with Jean-Luc Creiier of France 
second in 1:58.69 and Harraes 
Trinkl of Austria third in 1:58.87. 

'To win a downhill was a goal 
for rae ~ Aamodt wid. “I knew I 
could win a downhill since my fifth 
place in Kvitjell last year. I under- 
stood 1 had the possibility to win a 
downhill race. Last week 1 was jusl 
six-hundredths behind the winner 
in Weneen." 

Kvitjell. Norway, will be the sue 
of the downhill race at toe winter 
Olympics, which begin Feb. 1*. 

Creiier. who came back from a 
fall at Wcngen. said. “I was stall 
having trouble walking four days 
aao. I still have some pom m my 
knee. You needed a lot of power on 
the last pan of ihe course where it 
was icy and hard.” 

• Toni Nieminen. 18. gojd med- 
alist in the individual high Ml 
event and team jumping at the I W- 
OWmpics. has been left off Fin- 
land's team for the Ldlehammer 
Games after a poor showing in the 
weekend's national £hamPio°‘ 
ships, the news agency STT report- 
ed. 


a wooden fence while on a ski gjjj* 

firrtiSfflSB 

Kahr. were killed in car crashes. 

Mater's death is the 23d among 
since World War U. Twelve have beea™ 
Hiirfng taring or training, but Maier is only the 
third woman to die 


t enough netting and 
_ .. jeakyfaQ- You can’t 
saiety iun ««»»» •* 

_ , artery was ripped,**.*) nafflytflame 1 anybody. ^ . . 

suigery was posaMe.” ’ • .. r V : «K 

* - rioctors said the mam iqury had occuried; conditions on Ste course^ howeva, 

vA^hSwu new off. fdt tal way Sdd U* — 

, Skiing Deaths Since 1959 

hopes at the Oiyingics next^ . track “was Efce sheer ice, like trying to survive tAusMol . ^ s^meiinck < 

* 1989 world SojS^Ue woregor.^ » - USSST — " 


, pregnant with 


to heal, then returned toroccrarfuBy : Ano* 

tki> iQQi. rihflmnifflBhiPS Ht-S aWMb .fresh si 


tide at the 1991 
Austria. . 

-Herwig . 
team chief, «» 


ice in some sections anu son . 

- • An ovrnnght^now storm dumped a layeroi 

^T ? l^ a wi^offidaS e the 



Italian Kostner. 

Marred Women's Downhill 


Tb _| ifr-rn (Austrto). John Sommeilnt* ICanodol 
1M4 Ross Milne (Audrla), waller Nhiwner (liaiv) 

1W0 Silvia Suter (SwI tzerla wD 
W70 Michel Bacon (France) 

^ E*S£aSL. -WM 

iSuonarto DflvM (Italy) Ccllewo* Inlurles sustained m 1W 

after years In anna) * •« — - — — . 

Maipr „ a 1993 race with daughter Metole. wbo wa, born to 1989. 

TW3 Korin TTxKin (SMMHn) — - — “ ' 

WM Ulrike Maier tAusinai 


The Associated Press 
GARM1SCH-PARTENK1R- 
CHEN, Germanv — Italian t«n- 
ager Isolde Kostner got her first 
World Cup victory in the downhill 
race overshadowed by the crash 
that killed two-time world champi- 
on Ulrike Maier. 

The race was interrupted for 
about 30 minutes while Maier was 
ta ken from the lull by helicopter. 
Most of the competitors did not 
know she had died. 

The helicopter appeared to have 
blown some snow off the course, 
the temperature dropped and, 
when competition resumed, the _»cv 
course was much faster than it bad 
been. 


The top six finishers started after 
Maier’s crash. . 

Kostner, 18. and m her first 
World Cup season, posted a ume of 
1 minute, 44.04 seconds to win on 
the 2.865-meter long course. 

Melanie SucheL a 17-year-old 
rookie Frenchwoman, finished sec- 
ond in 1:44.68. with Michelle 
Rulhven. a 26-year-old Canadian, 
pla cin g third in 1 :44.75. 

TO OUR REAPERS 
IN ALBANIA 

Hand delivery 
is now available 

Jus) call M2J 23 502 

"Independent Albanian 
Economic Tribune 



Attack 




PORTLAND, Qi 
Harding’s former 1 . 
caied her in * 

figure skating rival, Nwer*|“*v 
Xody iSta FBI agentej^ffi 

■Ba statement Iqrherlmfc 
to lbeattack, a Portland 
- • ‘l Sunday. — 


the case. 

- s^A Gfflooly 'would nuike a 

’ ’^statement on Monday or 
v^oriadicatioin that Gflloo- 

m. W ihm 


an unusual step. Kwan would be 
available if Harding was removed 
. * {foe fast minute. 

second in the 
_m - which Har- 

» ^SSSSXSk tog^Tiffigau,who^s 

*T^ y Oregonian and the Detroit pic team along with Harto- 
TPrS^orted that Harding The Winter &mw be^ F^ 

oven Kerrigan’s room number lZbtrtwommsfip«skahnga^ 

uy f^kjustSwis before die no t start until Feb. 23 and *eros- 
StilEe bregonian said the in- w can be changed untd Fc*.2L 

r ^ - rni'Kiwnirattv T6- 



UNDER THE PATRONAGE OF 

HH General Sheikh MohammedB.n Raswd Al Maktolm, 
Minister of Defence, uAt 


JANUARY 31 - FEBRUARY 6, 1B9A 







'SfViirttfF'jM, taw* bjfB^dpb.® «><■«*- 

teLn was aol assaoltsd in 

ttMtesometinKtooro^etam . bodyguard, the Sbut foUowing a workout 

“rsi— k.— a 

fsss-s 

SSSff-JS -JESSES 

: « S5d^^ kept silent forda^ 

S^leaming that people dose to 

Meanwhile, investigators m D&- 


A Portland attorney is gal 
information to be used by a 
panel convened by the figure skai- 
inR association as it considers 
whether there is probable cause to 
hold a hearing on Hardings mem- 
berahip in the association. Sum a 
step is part oT the process that 
could lead to her removal from me 
team. 

-Our special counsel has pro- 

■ , ----- _.:.VVn and WTV Rffec- 


TEN 

N I S 

O P 

E N 

1 9 

9 A 









1^ 




SSSEL ZZSZSiZEi 

“ISnhiDdral- w : cent, althW . ^ b^^^Scmung and four in the HybL thefenner 

Tte^S«nan quoted Gfflootfs edged 'SS * UAGIympk Committee president 

V£-jKS2Mfl!£E : M«nwWv«he ^S. FjBur, who heads pnnd. _ _ 


• attorney, ww.* — r. ._ 

* brother’s version to* 8 ®? 01 **; ^ 

l would have fanen tm te 

’ sword for Toamd TonyuhadtoW 
' Sm the truth, but she didn V « 

^ quoted Hoevet as saying. 

• » " oillooiv persisted for some tone 
in* would notim- 


' Meanwhile, the U.S. Figure 
Soiting Association is strong^ 
considering sending Michelle 


Ga^es in UOe- 

officials were Tamme^Nor 


, Norway, as an alternate, 


V. ( 


sboweo vjiuooi 3 

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PARIS -^.Sea Owe, 

the Prix (PAmenw I 

Eorop^n Gnod Ctah 
^ the^ Rach fmorite,^ VoonMi md tost 

taI * M 

.*>g agg£j— - h—* 


The committee may have a rec- 
ommendation sooner than its sdi- 
imposed Feb. 10 deadline, he sad. 
don’t think the panel feels any 

pressure.' Hybl «!■ ^ 
pfl nri does want to do is expeone 
Seprocess so that a clearer picture 
for figure skating can be estab- 
lished^ 

Harding’s attorney, Robert 
Weaver Jr_ complained about tne 
number of" leaks from law enforce- 1 
ment officials regarding evidence 
in the case. 

“I am very displeased by 
amount of confidential mvesug£ 

the information Aa^routmcly^aPj 

pears in the media, he . 

S it does not speak wefl for the 

system." 


Season Tickets 

Grand Stand: Dhs. 500 
Box Seat: Dhs. 3,670 (including full hospitality) 

Tickets available between 12 noon and Spin from: 
Aviation Club, Tel: (.97 14) 826324 
The Forte Grand Dubai, Tel: (97 14) 826242 
AGMC BMW Showroom. 

Dubai Tel: (97 14) 664798 

Spinneys, Jumeira, Tel: (97 1 4) 4945 ^L 

For turther information, please call 19714) 826700. 

Timings 

Qualifying: 

Sat & Sun: 9am onwards 
V ' i Draw. 

Fri: 2pm & 7pm 

«n onwards (Semi-Finals) 

'finals). 


AVIATION CLUB TENNIS CENTRE 


(sB matehoe/aU days) 



looses First as Ra 

''the referee, -Ridnird Steele. 


Associated Press reported from 
Cardiff, Wales. , , ... 

piner got up at the count ofeigh^ 

_id(flewight 

Bam of Britain 13 months ago, 



The Dubai Tennis Open - a world-series ATP tournament with | 
money of USS1 Million. 

The Aviation Cub Term* Rea's 

a» the fun off it there's a Fast .^ SpaedTa^.^ ^ ^ and an 

m c^^opportuntiy ,o tae.-dnve BMW cars and bikes. 

Dubai celebrates this grand porting Di^lay^ competitions 

Boy « ^ and a School Essay Competition. 

The Dubai Tennis Open 1 994. It's a weeK full of fun and excitement. Donti mrss rt! 

PfeaaafcgauBretfalJWXrie 


Sergi Bruguera 
Thomas Muster 
Petr Korda 
Magnus Gustafsson 
Richard Krajicek 
Karel Novacek 
Alexander Volkov 
Ivan Lendl 
Wally Masur 
Wayne Ferreira 
Mark Woodtorde 
Pat Cash 
Fabrice Santoro 
MarcGoeltner 
Javier Sanchez 
Andrei Cherkasov 
EmBlo Sanchez 
Jason Stoltenberg 
Darren Cahill 
Marcos Ondruska 
Hanrik Hoim 
Greg Rusedski 
Younes B Aynaoui 
Christian Bergstrom 
Grad Connell 

Patrick Galbraith 
ToddWoodbridge 
Luke Jensen 
Murphy Jensen 
John Fitzgerald 
David Adams 
Andrei Othovst 


onCenaeGuat 


onowmoi 

FORTE 

GRAND 



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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 1994 


Culture: America’s Powerhouse Export 


By John Rockwell 

Hew York Tims Service 

P ARIS — Spiel bergian dinosaurs devouring attire na- 
tional fUm industries at a single gulp! Silver-haired 
villains and sloe-eyed ingenues setting new soap-opera 
standards for political incorrectness as half the wrld 
watches! Teenagers from Bangkok to Beirut wearing Chica- 
go Bulls caps backward and lamenting Mkhad Jordan's' 
retirement! Smoke bombs and lasers and thrusting pel vises 
and outraged clerics and intellectuals from Paris 10 Tehran 
(0 Beijing denouncing Michael Jackson and Madonna! 

As the millennium approaches — "Angels in America'* is 
also big worldwide, but rather higher of brow — American 
popular culture has never been more dominant internation- 
ally, nor more controversial- If. S. cultural exports swell at 
least some Americans with pride and help reduce the trade 
deficit- This is America's second-biggest export after air- 
craft . 

But just as some Americans have doubts about this pop 
culture— its propensity to celebrate violence, sexual stereo- 
typing and sheer kiwest-common-denominaior crassness — 
those doubts multiply abroad, especially when the imports 
are seen as a threat to local cultural identity. 

A survey of American pop-cultural influence by New 
York Times correspondents around the world reveals many 
things, from the quirky to the am using to the troubling. But 
the results also raise larger questions: Is America's domi- 
nance due to intrinsic strengths of its culture — its sheer 
flair and energy, its incarnation of democracy itself as 
marketable entertainment, its forging of a new international 
language? Or. as foreign critics lament, is it merely a 
function of America’s military and economic domination? 
Or capitalism run amok, a “pure monopoly in the worst 
sense," as Jacques Toubon. the French minister of culture, 
put it in the recent debate over world trade barriers? 

Statistically, America's impact is overwhelming. Of the 
world’s 100 most-attended films last year. 88 were Ameri- 
can, Variety reports. The highest-ranked competitor. 
France’s “Les Vision* was No. 27. That’s not even count- 
ing pop music, television, novels and the more nebulous, aH- 
pervasiYe imagery of American street fashion. 

But such dominance can breed insensitivity to other 
cultures’ fears that their traditional values may be lost 
Indeed, the insistence at the trade talks by Jack Valenti, 
president of the Motion Picture Association of America, 
and by Mickey Kantor, the American trade representative 
and Hollywood lawyer, that such fears were simply a 
smokescreen for protectionism may have pushed the rest of 
Europe into siding with the French to erect still more 
barriers to American 51ms and music 
Elite culture has nearly always been protected, even in the 
United Slates, and to eliminate that would be to fulfill 
Tocquevifle’s worst fears that a culture's excellence can be 
leveled by the common taste. 

Few could deny that some of America’s success is due 
simply to aggressive marketing. The popularity of a seven- 
year-old minor soaper like "The Bold and the Beautiful” in 
countries tike Lebanon. Egypt and India is a case in point. 



Nwalat A«'[HT 


For Americans abroad, a troubling aspect of its popular 
sdauyi 


culture is that so much of iL especially in East European and 
Third World countries, is inferior. Instead of its best films 
and television — best here meaning “Uoseanne,” not PBS 
— foreigners get second-tier shows like “The Bold and the 
Beautiful” and “BaywatdT marketed on the cheap. For 
executives in search of a deal, and audiences eager for any 
glimpq- of .American opulence; it may not matter much. But 


in the not-too- much-longer run, it tarnishes America’s na- 
tional image: 

Rampant piracy — the illegal copying of films, television 
programs and albums — contributes to this debasement of 
America's best popular culture. Companies lose royalties 
and foreign buyers may get grainier images or muddier 
sound. But whether Clint Eastwood and Janet Jackson get 
their cut. their Americanizing influence still spreads from 
bazaars in Nairobi to stalls in Changzhou. 

In decades past, America's chid cultural exports woe 
debonair crooners and stalwart upholders of truth, justice 
and the American way. Today, a different America exports 
products that reflect a dulling propensity for cartoon-like, 
bone-crunching, eyeball -popping violence. 

In the United States, pundits fret about children aping 
Beavis and Butt-bead and about violence on the s creen 
provoking violence in the streets. Abroad, those are worries, 
toa But for Americans, another worry should be that 
Foreigners may take its films and its rap literally, as an 
unexaggerated report on its state of affairs. In Brazil, the 
police justify atrocities by saying they’ve seen American 
judges lead mobs of nightriders on “Dark Justice.” 

American intellectuals complain that U. S. high culture is 
ignored in the face of this onslaught of action-heroics and 
indecent proposals. In fact, American high culture enjoys a 


purvey, for instance, may be more liberal wish-fulfiDment 
than reality, but it still serves well a world riven by ethnic 
haired. 

Then again, maybe "Hollywood” is itself no longer all 
that American, and its success abroad may be a testimony 
to its cosmopolitanism. When America’s supposedly na- 
tional fitir) industry boasts an Austrian mmat Schwarzen- 
egger as its biggest star, a Belgian named Van Damme dose 
behind in action films and a Chinese; Bruce Lee; as as 
honorable ancestor, when the French and the Japanese own 


studios or invest beavfly in “American” films, when HoHy- 
arofits from outside the United Slates, 


pretty beady reputation abroad. In Paris, for instance. H is 
hard to avoid 


1 avoid American painters, architects, authors, danc- 
ers, composers and theater directors traipsing through town. 

But popular culture remains America's signal cultural 
contribution to the world. Its dominance today is not all 
■bad — commercially, morally or imagistically. The picture 
of multicultural acceptance American films and television 


wood gets half its pr 
then just bow parochially American is its entertainment 
industry, anyway? 

It may be that tire world is being inexorably transformed 
from old to new, from narrow to broad, from kayak to jet. 
Maybe Western suits worn by Saudi or African business- 
men, maybe even the English language itself, are not so 
much emblems of American superiority as the simple accep- 
tance by a developing wodd of a single international stan- 
dard of discourse. On that model periodic eruptions of 
religious and nationalist resentment are mere spray on the 
sweeping wave of history. On chat same model “Holly- 
wood” and America itself may be more metaphors than 
vdocaraptors. They may represent not tire monopolistic 
invasion by one country of all the others bu t tire focal point 
of an international mass culture forming before our eyes. 

No wonder French intellectuals are afraid. What they see 
is not some alien marauder but the inevitable consequBBces 
of their own revolution, the ones Tocqueville himself found 
so alluring and terrifying: liberty, equality and, even, may- 
be, fraternity. 


language 


A Rare Ripple of Automaticity 


By William Safire you are 

W ASHINGTON — Nouns, irritated at being nounifier or nomnaimx. m smoothidty 

turned into vert* at the slightest hat-hopping, nouns with smoothness and warn 



rti Luv mills nuwe, umniyjrHBiww. — nr.jhmT Of oetense Wliunu**** 

word for “mind benders,” a variant of spinmasiers) agreed-upon TTre metaphor of machinery 

called in the usual suspects before President Clinton s democratic B^J^S-'svnooYBWo* with orvohmtay 
recent trip to Europe and Russia. Over lunch in what — m which autmtmcsyw^ ^ ^ amiliar auto- 
is now called the Family Dining Room, the bigfctt of —jams the i^^^^Sboards of our minds, 
the Opinion Mafia were permitted to ask very heavy ■*>**“"“ 1 "ygunuice. Certainty. 


We have oiber noons 

Most memorably leaden question was posed by Guarantee. 

Michael Kramer of Time magazine, following in the 
former columnist Strobe Talbott’s ever-ascending 
footsteps, about 

qni 

President, on the security front. Y 

kDOW 


w the Central European objection — the flaw of rTTr^jg had not played wefl. 
the partnership — is toe lack of automaticity at the “i think our slogan would be there needs to be more 
end." n-fnrmand morewdal service support," Ointcnsnd, 

Automaticity rippled through the group like tatter attempts to build a safety net to deal with the 

through a hot knife. The national security adviser — of reform, but not an attempt to slow 

cunning, devious Tony Lake (who has asked that we ^wutbe reform effort.” 

use those adjectives before his name)— snapped back .i n^n, The longer he rolled on, the more eyes 

into focus as we looked at one another with a wild . heavenward. imtO he realized the bind he had 
surmise: Was this word the long-awaited replacement ‘TL cn hi _ 3e j f He interrupted himself to say, 
for neo-containment, or what? What kind of -idty is nQ . ttoorc ytfdnn, more support-' I should haw 

J°c<^^hardJy wail to get back to the Oxford Gaelic slw&U “army” 

English Dictionary in my office. There was one 1870s WrTV •» which combined to form the word 

EJSZL tattle erv of the Scottish Highland dans. 


Slogan 

citation, from a book oh brain functions, about man the tattle cry 

(which was what humankind was once called) “in s w an should be short enough to fit 

whom volition is predominant and automaticity plays Vbnmna- state; The president recovered with 

only a subordinate part in motor activities.” 

For recent usage, I ran a Dialog computer search. 

There, in a 19 75 Knitting Times, was a story need ting 
an exhibition of machines with "greater pattern poten- 


tial, higher knitting speeds, more automaticity and 
better production efficiency.” In 1993, the medical 
lal Chest ar 


journal Chest argued, “Sarcoid granulomas in the 
ventricular myocardium can readily become foci far 
abnormal aromaticity." (What do they mean by 
readily?) 

With a century-old history, and current usage in 


disparate publications, automatkity's legitimacy can- Titanic generation, was scorned. You cpuldn t write a 

..‘.i . R.-II I . 1 • _ r __ ■■ tka Oinntc IITfiU9l- 


noi be challenged- Still, it has the ring of rarity; 
specificity was the same way at first, tat m the most 
recent hundred years we came to use that noun, 
derived from the adjective specific, whenever we want 
to use the nominative to aaU something down. The 
noun form of authentic also remains popular; a com- 
mercial for Classic© pasta sauces says, “Taste the 


list. 


difference authenticity makes.* 

□pies of adjectivo-to-noun transitions in 


Other examples 
vogue: “How come negativity T Ed Turner of CNN 
writes. "One does not hear positivity." 

For “the quality of being negative." I would use 
something like nay-saying, but that’s because Fm a 
nattering nabob of negativism; on a TV commercial 
for the Psychic Friends Network, a phone-in service to 


summon spirits from the vasiy deep, a network nsy- 
ie talks to callers to “show 


chic named Chris says she 
them that they can create positivity in their life (sic).” 
And the -ity form of c hanging modifiers 10 thing s 
saved Albert Einstein from a theory of relativism. 


UYTERI YAHOI YAL 

CLASSIFIED 

Appears an Page 4 


WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


Europe 


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Forecast for Tuesday through Thursday, as provided by Accu-Wealher. 



North America 

RaUta: cold weather 
Tuesday through Thursday 
in much of (he United States 
and Canada Snow possible 
in Detroit and Toronto late 
Wednesday into Thursday. 
Dry weather this weak Prom 
Seattle to San Diego. Rather 
cloudy In Mexico City 
Tuesday, then seme 
sunshine Wednesday and 


Europe 

Fearsome gales win sweep 
through Norway and Sweden 
into Wednesday. Snow and 
rain wfll tat Wind and rain 
wW come in waves through 
the period in the United 
Kingdom. Ireland, northern 
France. Belgium. 

Netherlands. Denmark and 
much ol Germany. Italy. 
Spain and Portugal will 


Asia 

Rain will Ian Tuesday tram 
Osaka to Tokyo, and it will 
be snowy tort her north 
Oner, blustery weather will 
follow, in Shanghai, 'he 
period may begin with cold 
rain A d»y cold will linger 
Iran Beijing to Seoul. Any 
rain <n Hong Kong and 
Taipei should ayckty pass. 


Middle East 


Latin America 


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srFsrra. Hca. w-WUaffwr. Afl maps, lorecasU and data provided by Aceu-Weatttar. Inc. v 199« 


Asia 


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ACROSS 


i Wrongs 
s Stackyard 
group 

9 Sail supports 
14 Go- n. agents 
19 War of 1812 
battle site 
is Member of a 
crowd scene 
17 Give stars to 
19 Baskerball's 
Chambe/lam 
19 1 S93 Formula 
One winner 
Prost 


20 Old 'House 
Parly' host 

S3 Knocks down 

24 Reserved 

25 1975 Stephanie 
Mills musical, 
With 'The' 

23 Hot time In Paris 

29 Take turns 

33 Kind o* package 

34 More albinolike 

35 Phobic 

37 P.G.A 61992 
leading money 
winner 


Solution to Puzzle of Jan. 28 


PIBIE1PWE RlR 

^■njAiD m 


□□ESQ nnms 0[ii00 
BntntDQ sacra ansa 
□anna aaaQ asas 

OSH 00E3U 0000 

0noa sHQsaaaaaa 
!□□□ 000 
0000 
□£1000 
□HQQ000 
huq Ljana 
□00 0000 
011 00Q 
□0 00D00 
00 00000 
0 Q sasa- - 


39 Rickey 

Henderson stat 

41 Hunter of mytti 

42 WeU ventilated 

43 Least exciting 
45 Rotary disk 

49 Sign ol summer 

49 Mathemati- 
cians letters 

50 Throw 
52N.F.L receiver 

for 1 8 seasons 
57 Booby 
59 Not in use 
•o Crips or Bloods 

si Uns's* 

Pass’ 

82 Baylor mascot 
*3 Skirt 

•4 Check writer 
95 Slumped 
86 Actress 
Charlotte etal. 


7 Small brook 

8 Loathe 

9 Substantial 

10 Wheel shaft 

11 Noted film 
trilogy 

12 Angle starter 

IS Jose 

21 Hebrew for - 
'contender with 
God* 

22 Eponymous 
poet of Greek 
drama 

28 Tamper 
27 British alphabet 
ender 

30 Elderly one 

31 Gumshoe 

32“ With a 

View’ 


© New York Tunes Edited by Will Shortz, 

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1 Attack by plane 

2 Turkish hostelry 
a Stinging plant 

4 Fish-fine 
attachment 
s Axed 

6 Dancer Bruhn 


33 Columnist Herb 

34 Supplicate 
38 Thread of life 

spinner. In myth 

37 Savage ness 

38 Late actress 
Mary 

39NaCl.toa 

pharmacist 

40 Truss 
44 Deviates from 
the script 
48 Party to Naha 



4« Exact 
•' retribution 
47Ehtarsa 
freeway 
49 Persian Guff 
land 


si Treuanian'e 
“The- — 

: Sanction* 


53 Green target 

54 Madison 
Avenue product 


55 Ardor 
SB Boor 
37 Cutup 
5trNoche'< 


opposite 


Travel in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


Af&r Access Numbers. 

How to call around the world. 

1 LSing the dun N?l» iw. find rhu country vi hi arv calling from. . • 

1 Dui the rorrvsprifiijinc; iJ&T Actw; Number. 

.< An tUtT Englnh -fx.-.vkinp Operator or w rice prompt will askfbrdw phonenumber yoirwtah to call or conned you to a • 
cusi.^ncr xm jv e representative. .... 

To receive \xxtr fnx waDci card of /O&rs Access Numbers, just efiai Ite access number of 
ihecounliy youYrin and ask forCuntcvnerSenicc 


^ ColVmg ; Gar* ' 


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convenient Access Numbers on your righL 



COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 

ASIA/PACIF1C 

Hungary" 

00*-80<M)l 111 

Australia 

OOli-881-OU 

Iceland** 

999-001 

ChinauPRO** 

10811 

Ireland 

1-800-550-000 

Guam 

018-872 

Italy" 

172-1013 

KongKooa 

800-1111 

Liechtenstein* 

155-00-11 

India* 

000-117 

Lithuania* 

&tl9G 

Indonesia* 

00-801-10 

Luxembourg 

o-aowjui 

.Upon* 

WJMll 

MafaaT 

0800-890-110 

Korea 

009-11 

Monaco" 

194.-0011 

Korea** 

11" 

Netherlands* 

06-022-9111 

.Malaysia* 

8000011 

Norway- 

800-190-13 

New Zeatand 

ncywii 

Poland**" 

OaOIO-480-0111 

Philippines* 

105-11 

Portugal* 

05017-1-288 

Bnssfa-tMoscnwJ 

155-5042 

Bnirutili 

03-800-4288 

Saipan* 

235-2872 

Slovakia 

00-42000101 

Siiiftipciar 

Niootj i-m 

Spain 

9009900-11 

SriLjniia 

•*304311 

Swedm" 

020-795-611 

Taiwan* 

0080102800 

Swtaerfand* 

25500-12 

TTuiLuiJ* 

COI9-091- in | ■ 

VX. 

0500090011 

EUROPE 

MIDDLE EAST 

Armenia" 

8*14111 


800001 

Austria"" 

022-004-01 1 

Egypt* (Cairo) 

• 510-0200 

Ddsaiffl* 

U/H-i t-noio 

farad 

377-100-272/ 

BuJxjfij 

POiWOiWlO 

Kiwai: 

800-288 

Croatia** 

9WOOOH 

Lebanon CBdra) 

426003 

Cvprj** 

CKMXKRa 

Saudi Arabia 

\ J-800-100 

Czech Rep 

00420-00101 

Turkey" 

OOOOCW2Z77 

Denmark* 

8001-0010 

AMERICAS 

Finland* 

9800-100-10 

Argcndra* 

001-800-200-1113 

France 

19 *-0011 

Belize* ' 

555- 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 


Chile 


Colombia 


WU-0312T 


990-11-0020 


OmRIara 


114' 


Ecuador* 


a&dvadoTB 


U9 


190 


Guatemala' . 

190 

Guyana*** 

• 365 

Honduras** 

123 

Me3QCO*AA 

95-800-462-4240 

Nkaragr»(Mana*ttt»l 174 

PSuaunu 

209 

Peru* 

- .191 

Suriname 

• * 156 

Uruguay . 

. . _ (XM>410 

Venezuela" 


CARIBBEAN 

Bahamaa 

' 1-800-872-2881- 

Bennadar . 

■ 1-800-872-2881 

BtMshVX 

1-W0-872-2881 

Cayman Idands 

. 1-80W7238BI: 

Grenada* 

/ 3-8b(W72-3881 , 

RaW" 

. 001-800r972-2883 

jiariffl" 

. 8800872-2881 

Netfa. Astfl 

001-800-872-2881 


on a tamper sticker, ine preawiu 

“That would be the newest rap on me: umton en- 

doraes wraparound bumper stickers. 

D 

“This was a wake-up call.” Vice President A1 Gore 
said of the unexpectedly strong showing of the uitra- 
nationahst VJa&rZhirinovsky m the Russian 

^TTiemetaphor wead ting-a-ling on the iirigbi tables of 
users around the worid. Warning was passe; 
alert fcfl a-snoozing; even SOS, so exciting to the 


A 


piece without the words fascist, imden- 
and wake^ip caU. 

citation of tins noun pdirase m tbe OED 
ement is a 1976 use in a Paul Henissart novel, 
filter Quarry”: “He ... left a wake-op call for 

right A- M.” _ ^ . . 

Lexicographic Irregulars, Hold Guest Division, 
should be able to do better than that Send pre-1976 
print citatio ns to Safire's Wake-Up Call, NYT Wash- 
ington Bureau, 1627 Eye Street NW, Washington, 
D.C. 20006. rn be downstairs in the Snooze Bar. 

New York Times Service 




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00-800-1311 Brad 


MPfrUtt Liberia 


08b0-10 


AT&T 


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